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-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/ADSBitsy43
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Assabet300
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Brutus66
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/CERF29
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/FreeBird21
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsClient98
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsMaster53
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/HUW_WEBPANEL17
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Itsy39
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/LART14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/PLEB11
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Pangolin23
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Tifon7
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Victor16
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/Yopy2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/empeg2
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/nanoEngine11
-rw-r--r--Documentation/arm/SA1100/serial_UART47
18 files changed, 799 insertions, 0 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/ADSBitsy b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/ADSBitsy
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..f9f62e8c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/ADSBitsy
@@ -0,0 +1,43 @@
+ADS Bitsy Single Board Computer
+(It is different from Bitsy(iPAQ) of Compaq)
+
+For more details, contact Applied Data Systems or see
+http://www.applieddata.net/products.html
+
+The Linux support for this product has been provided by
+Woojung Huh <whuh@applieddata.net>
+
+Use 'make adsbitsy_config' before any 'make config'.
+This will set up defaults for ADS Bitsy support.
+
+The kernel zImage is linked to be loaded and executed at 0xc0400000.
+
+Linux can be used with the ADS BootLoader that ships with the
+newer rev boards. See their documentation on how to load Linux.
+
+Supported peripherals:
+- SA1100 LCD frame buffer (8/16bpp...sort of)
+- SA1111 USB Master
+- SA1100 serial port
+- pcmcia, compact flash
+- touchscreen(ucb1200)
+- console on LCD screen
+- serial ports (ttyS[0-2])
+ - ttyS0 is default for serial console
+
+To do:
+- everything else! :-)
+
+Notes:
+
+- The flash on board is divided into 3 partitions.
+ You should be careful to use flash on board.
+ Its partition is different from GraphicsClient Plus and GraphicsMaster
+
+- 16bpp mode requires a different cable than what ships with the board.
+ Contact ADS or look through the manual to wire your own. Currently,
+ if you compile with 16bit mode support and switch into a lower bpp
+ mode, the timing is off so the image is corrupted. This will be
+ fixed soon.
+
+Any contribution can be sent to nico@fluxnic.net and will be greatly welcome!
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Assabet b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Assabet
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..08b885d3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Assabet
@@ -0,0 +1,300 @@
+The Intel Assabet (SA-1110 evaluation) board
+============================================
+
+Please see:
+http://developer.intel.com
+
+Also some notes from John G Dorsey <jd5q@andrew.cmu.edu>:
+http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~wearable/software/assabet.html
+
+
+Building the kernel
+-------------------
+
+To build the kernel with current defaults:
+
+ make assabet_config
+ make oldconfig
+ make zImage
+
+The resulting kernel image should be available in linux/arch/arm/boot/zImage.
+
+
+Installing a bootloader
+-----------------------
+
+A couple of bootloaders able to boot Linux on Assabet are available:
+
+BLOB (http://www.lartmaker.nl/lartware/blob/)
+
+ BLOB is a bootloader used within the LART project. Some contributed
+ patches were merged into BLOB to add support for Assabet.
+
+Compaq's Bootldr + John Dorsey's patch for Assabet support
+(http://www.handhelds.org/Compaq/bootldr.html)
+(http://www.wearablegroup.org/software/bootldr/)
+
+ Bootldr is the bootloader developed by Compaq for the iPAQ Pocket PC.
+ John Dorsey has produced add-on patches to add support for Assabet and
+ the JFFS filesystem.
+
+RedBoot (http://sources.redhat.com/redboot/)
+
+ RedBoot is a bootloader developed by Red Hat based on the eCos RTOS
+ hardware abstraction layer. It supports Assabet amongst many other
+ hardware platforms.
+
+RedBoot is currently the recommended choice since it's the only one to have
+networking support, and is the most actively maintained.
+
+Brief examples on how to boot Linux with RedBoot are shown below. But first
+you need to have RedBoot installed in your flash memory. A known to work
+precompiled RedBoot binary is available from the following location:
+
+ftp://ftp.netwinder.org/users/n/nico/
+ftp://ftp.arm.linux.org.uk/pub/linux/arm/people/nico/
+ftp://ftp.handhelds.org/pub/linux/arm/sa-1100-patches/
+
+Look for redboot-assabet*.tgz. Some installation infos are provided in
+redboot-assabet*.txt.
+
+
+Initial RedBoot configuration
+-----------------------------
+
+The commands used here are explained in The RedBoot User's Guide available
+on-line at http://sources.redhat.com/ecos/docs.html.
+Please refer to it for explanations.
+
+If you have a CF network card (my Assabet kit contained a CF+ LP-E from
+Socket Communications Inc.), you should strongly consider using it for TFTP
+file transfers. You must insert it before RedBoot runs since it can't detect
+it dynamically.
+
+To initialize the flash directory:
+
+ fis init -f
+
+To initialize the non-volatile settings, like whether you want to use BOOTP or
+a static IP address, etc, use this command:
+
+ fconfig -i
+
+
+Writing a kernel image into flash
+---------------------------------
+
+First, the kernel image must be loaded into RAM. If you have the zImage file
+available on a TFTP server:
+
+ load zImage -r -b 0x100000
+
+If you rather want to use Y-Modem upload over the serial port:
+
+ load -m ymodem -r -b 0x100000
+
+To write it to flash:
+
+ fis create "Linux kernel" -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000
+
+
+Booting the kernel
+------------------
+
+The kernel still requires a filesystem to boot. A ramdisk image can be loaded
+as follows:
+
+ load ramdisk_image.gz -r -b 0x800000
+
+Again, Y-Modem upload can be used instead of TFTP by replacing the file name
+by '-y ymodem'.
+
+Now the kernel can be retrieved from flash like this:
+
+ fis load "Linux kernel"
+
+or loaded as described previously. To boot the kernel:
+
+ exec -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000
+
+The ramdisk image could be stored into flash as well, but there are better
+solutions for on-flash filesystems as mentioned below.
+
+
+Using JFFS2
+-----------
+
+Using JFFS2 (the Second Journalling Flash File System) is probably the most
+convenient way to store a writable filesystem into flash. JFFS2 is used in
+conjunction with the MTD layer which is responsible for low-level flash
+management. More information on the Linux MTD can be found on-line at:
+http://www.linux-mtd.infradead.org/. A JFFS howto with some infos about
+creating JFFS/JFFS2 images is available from the same site.
+
+For instance, a sample JFFS2 image can be retrieved from the same FTP sites
+mentioned below for the precompiled RedBoot image.
+
+To load this file:
+
+ load sample_img.jffs2 -r -b 0x100000
+
+The result should look like:
+
+RedBoot> load sample_img.jffs2 -r -b 0x100000
+Raw file loaded 0x00100000-0x00377424
+
+Now we must know the size of the unallocated flash:
+
+ fis free
+
+Result:
+
+RedBoot> fis free
+ 0x500E0000 .. 0x503C0000
+
+The values above may be different depending on the size of the filesystem and
+the type of flash. See their usage below as an example and take care of
+substituting yours appropriately.
+
+We must determine some values:
+
+size of unallocated flash: 0x503c0000 - 0x500e0000 = 0x2e0000
+size of the filesystem image: 0x00377424 - 0x00100000 = 0x277424
+
+We want to fit the filesystem image of course, but we also want to give it all
+the remaining flash space as well. To write it:
+
+ fis unlock -f 0x500E0000 -l 0x2e0000
+ fis erase -f 0x500E0000 -l 0x2e0000
+ fis write -b 0x100000 -l 0x277424 -f 0x500E0000
+ fis create "JFFS2" -n -f 0x500E0000 -l 0x2e0000
+
+Now the filesystem is associated to a MTD "partition" once Linux has discovered
+what they are in the boot process. From Redboot, the 'fis list' command
+displays them:
+
+RedBoot> fis list
+Name FLASH addr Mem addr Length Entry point
+RedBoot 0x50000000 0x50000000 0x00020000 0x00000000
+RedBoot config 0x503C0000 0x503C0000 0x00020000 0x00000000
+FIS directory 0x503E0000 0x503E0000 0x00020000 0x00000000
+Linux kernel 0x50020000 0x00100000 0x000C0000 0x00000000
+JFFS2 0x500E0000 0x500E0000 0x002E0000 0x00000000
+
+However Linux should display something like:
+
+SA1100 flash: probing 32-bit flash bus
+SA1100 flash: Found 2 x16 devices at 0x0 in 32-bit mode
+Using RedBoot partition definition
+Creating 5 MTD partitions on "SA1100 flash":
+0x00000000-0x00020000 : "RedBoot"
+0x00020000-0x000e0000 : "Linux kernel"
+0x000e0000-0x003c0000 : "JFFS2"
+0x003c0000-0x003e0000 : "RedBoot config"
+0x003e0000-0x00400000 : "FIS directory"
+
+What's important here is the position of the partition we are interested in,
+which is the third one. Within Linux, this correspond to /dev/mtdblock2.
+Therefore to boot Linux with the kernel and its root filesystem in flash, we
+need this RedBoot command:
+
+ fis load "Linux kernel"
+ exec -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000 -c "root=/dev/mtdblock2"
+
+Of course other filesystems than JFFS might be used, like cramfs for example.
+You might want to boot with a root filesystem over NFS, etc. It is also
+possible, and sometimes more convenient, to flash a filesystem directly from
+within Linux while booted from a ramdisk or NFS. The Linux MTD repository has
+many tools to deal with flash memory as well, to erase it for example. JFFS2
+can then be mounted directly on a freshly erased partition and files can be
+copied over directly. Etc...
+
+
+RedBoot scripting
+-----------------
+
+All the commands above aren't so useful if they have to be typed in every
+time the Assabet is rebooted. Therefore it's possible to automatize the boot
+process using RedBoot's scripting capability.
+
+For example, I use this to boot Linux with both the kernel and the ramdisk
+images retrieved from a TFTP server on the network:
+
+RedBoot> fconfig
+Run script at boot: false true
+Boot script:
+Enter script, terminate with empty line
+>> load zImage -r -b 0x100000
+>> load ramdisk_ks.gz -r -b 0x800000
+>> exec -b 0x100000 -l 0xc0000
+>>
+Boot script timeout (1000ms resolution): 3
+Use BOOTP for network configuration: true
+GDB connection port: 9000
+Network debug at boot time: false
+Update RedBoot non-volatile configuration - are you sure (y/n)? y
+
+Then, rebooting the Assabet is just a matter of waiting for the login prompt.
+
+
+
+Nicolas Pitre
+nico@fluxnic.net
+June 12, 2001
+
+
+Status of peripherals in -rmk tree (updated 14/10/2001)
+-------------------------------------------------------
+
+Assabet:
+ Serial ports:
+ Radio: TX, RX, CTS, DSR, DCD, RI
+ PM: Not tested.
+ COM: TX, RX, CTS, DSR, DCD, RTS, DTR, PM
+ PM: Not tested.
+ I2C: Implemented, not fully tested.
+ L3: Fully tested, pass.
+ PM: Not tested.
+
+ Video:
+ LCD: Fully tested. PM
+ (LCD doesn't like being blanked with
+ neponset connected)
+ Video out: Not fully
+
+ Audio:
+ UDA1341:
+ Playback: Fully tested, pass.
+ Record: Implemented, not tested.
+ PM: Not tested.
+
+ UCB1200:
+ Audio play: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ Audio rec: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ Telco audio play: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ Telco audio rec: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ POTS control: No
+ Touchscreen: Yes
+ PM: Not tested.
+
+ Other:
+ PCMCIA:
+ LPE: Fully tested, pass.
+ USB: No
+ IRDA:
+ SIR: Fully tested, pass.
+ FIR: Fully tested, pass.
+ PM: Not tested.
+
+Neponset:
+ Serial ports:
+ COM1,2: TX, RX, CTS, DSR, DCD, RTS, DTR
+ PM: Not tested.
+ USB: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ PCMCIA: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ PM: Not tested.
+ CF: Implemented, not heavily tested.
+ PM: Not tested.
+
+More stuff can be found in the -np (Nicolas Pitre's) tree.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Brutus b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Brutus
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..6a3aa95e
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Brutus
@@ -0,0 +1,66 @@
+Brutus is an evaluation platform for the SA1100 manufactured by Intel.
+For more details, see:
+
+http://developer.intel.com
+
+To compile for Brutus, you must issue the following commands:
+
+ make brutus_config
+ make config
+ [accept all the defaults]
+ make zImage
+
+The resulting kernel will end up in linux/arch/arm/boot/zImage. This file
+must be loaded at 0xc0008000 in Brutus's memory and execution started at
+0xc0008000 as well with the value of registers r0 = 0 and r1 = 16 upon
+entry.
+
+But prior to execute the kernel, a ramdisk image must also be loaded in
+memory. Use memory address 0xd8000000 for this. Note that the file
+containing the (compressed) ramdisk image must not exceed 4 MB.
+
+Typically, you'll need angelboot to load the kernel.
+The following angelboot.opt file should be used:
+
+----- begin angelboot.opt -----
+base 0xc0008000
+entry 0xc0008000
+r0 0x00000000
+r1 0x00000010
+device /dev/ttyS0
+options "9600 8N1"
+baud 115200
+otherfile ramdisk_img.gz
+otherbase 0xd8000000
+----- end angelboot.opt -----
+
+Then load the kernel and ramdisk with:
+
+ angelboot -f angelboot.opt zImage
+
+The first Brutus serial port (assumed to be linked to /dev/ttyS0 on your
+host PC) is used by angel to load the kernel and ramdisk image. The serial
+console is provided through the second Brutus serial port. To access it,
+you may use minicom configured with /dev/ttyS1, 9600 baud, 8N1, no flow
+control.
+
+Currently supported:
+ - RS232 serial ports
+ - audio output
+ - LCD screen
+ - keyboard
+
+The actual Brutus support may not be complete without extra patches.
+If such patches exist, they should be found from
+ftp.netwinder.org/users/n/nico.
+
+A full PCMCIA support is still missing, although it's possible to hack
+some drivers in order to drive already inserted cards at boot time with
+little modifications.
+
+Any contribution is welcome.
+
+Please send patches to nico@fluxnic.net
+
+Have Fun !
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/CERF b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/CERF
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..b3d84530
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/CERF
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+*** The StrongARM version of the CerfBoard/Cube has been discontinued ***
+
+The Intrinsyc CerfBoard is a StrongARM 1110-based computer on a board
+that measures approximately 2" square. It includes an Ethernet
+controller, an RS232-compatible serial port, a USB function port, and
+one CompactFlash+ slot on the back. Pictures can be found at the
+Intrinsyc website, http://www.intrinsyc.com.
+
+This document describes the support in the Linux kernel for the
+Intrinsyc CerfBoard.
+
+Supported in this version:
+ - CompactFlash+ slot (select PCMCIA in General Setup and any options
+ that may be required)
+ - Onboard Crystal CS8900 Ethernet controller (Cerf CS8900A support in
+ Network Devices)
+ - Serial ports with a serial console (hardcoded to 38400 8N1)
+
+In order to get this kernel onto your Cerf, you need a server that runs
+both BOOTP and TFTP. Detailed instructions should have come with your
+evaluation kit on how to use the bootloader. This series of commands
+will suffice:
+
+ make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=arm-linux- cerfcube_defconfig
+ make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=arm-linux- zImage
+ make ARCH=arm CROSS_COMPILE=arm-linux- modules
+ cp arch/arm/boot/zImage <TFTP directory>
+
+support@intrinsyc.com
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/FreeBird b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/FreeBird
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..ab919366
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/FreeBird
@@ -0,0 +1,21 @@
+Freebird-1.1 is produced by Legend(C), Inc.
+http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.legend.com.cn
+and software/linux maintained by Coventive(C), Inc.
+(http://www.coventive.com)
+
+Based on the Nicolas's strongarm kernel tree.
+
+===============================================================
+Maintainer:
+
+Chester Kuo <chester@coventive.com>
+ <chester@linux.org.tw>
+
+Author :
+Tim wu <timwu@coventive.com>
+CIH <cih@coventive.com>
+Eric Peng <ericpeng@coventive.com>
+Jeff Lee <jeff_lee@coventive.com>
+Allen Cheng
+Tony Liu <tonyliu@coventive.com>
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsClient b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsClient
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..867bb359
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsClient
@@ -0,0 +1,98 @@
+ADS GraphicsClient Plus Single Board Computer
+
+For more details, contact Applied Data Systems or see
+http://www.applieddata.net/products.html
+
+The original Linux support for this product has been provided by
+Nicolas Pitre <nico@fluxnic.net>. Continued development work by
+Woojung Huh <whuh@applieddata.net>
+
+It's currently possible to mount a root filesystem via NFS providing a
+complete Linux environment. Otherwise a ramdisk image may be used. The
+board supports MTD/JFFS, so you could also mount something on there.
+
+Use 'make graphicsclient_config' before any 'make config'. This will set up
+defaults for GraphicsClient Plus support.
+
+The kernel zImage is linked to be loaded and executed at 0xc0200000.
+Also the following registers should have the specified values upon entry:
+
+ r0 = 0
+ r1 = 29 (this is the GraphicsClient architecture number)
+
+Linux can be used with the ADS BootLoader that ships with the
+newer rev boards. See their documentation on how to load Linux.
+Angel is not available for the GraphicsClient Plus AFAIK.
+
+There is a board known as just the GraphicsClient that ADS used to
+produce but has end of lifed. This code will not work on the older
+board with the ADS bootloader, but should still work with Angel,
+as outlined below. In any case, if you're planning on deploying
+something en masse, you should probably get the newer board.
+
+If using Angel on the older boards, here is a typical angel.opt option file
+if the kernel is loaded through the Angel Debug Monitor:
+
+----- begin angelboot.opt -----
+base 0xc0200000
+entry 0xc0200000
+r0 0x00000000
+r1 0x0000001d
+device /dev/ttyS1
+options "38400 8N1"
+baud 115200
+#otherfile ramdisk.gz
+#otherbase 0xc0800000
+exec minicom
+----- end angelboot.opt -----
+
+Then the kernel (and ramdisk if otherfile/otherbase lines above are
+uncommented) would be loaded with:
+
+ angelboot -f angelboot.opt zImage
+
+Here it is assumed that the board is connected to ttyS1 on your PC
+and that minicom is preconfigured with /dev/ttyS1, 38400 baud, 8N1, no flow
+control by default.
+
+If any other bootloader is used, ensure it accomplish the same, especially
+for r0/r1 register values before jumping into the kernel.
+
+
+Supported peripherals:
+- SA1100 LCD frame buffer (8/16bpp...sort of)
+- on-board SMC 92C96 ethernet NIC
+- SA1100 serial port
+- flash memory access (MTD/JFFS)
+- pcmcia
+- touchscreen(ucb1200)
+- ps/2 keyboard
+- console on LCD screen
+- serial ports (ttyS[0-2])
+ - ttyS0 is default for serial console
+- Smart I/O (ADC, keypad, digital inputs, etc)
+ See http://www.eurotech-inc.com/linux-sbc.asp for IOCTL documentation
+ and example user space code. ps/2 keybd is multiplexed through this driver
+
+To do:
+- UCB1200 audio with new ucb_generic layer
+- everything else! :-)
+
+Notes:
+
+- The flash on board is divided into 3 partitions. mtd0 is where
+ the ADS boot ROM and zImage is stored. It's been marked as
+ read-only to keep you from blasting over the bootloader. :) mtd1 is
+ for the ramdisk.gz image. mtd2 is user flash space and can be
+ utilized for either JFFS or if you're feeling crazy, running ext2
+ on top of it. If you're not using the ADS bootloader, you're
+ welcome to blast over the mtd1 partition also.
+
+- 16bpp mode requires a different cable than what ships with the board.
+ Contact ADS or look through the manual to wire your own. Currently,
+ if you compile with 16bit mode support and switch into a lower bpp
+ mode, the timing is off so the image is corrupted. This will be
+ fixed soon.
+
+Any contribution can be sent to nico@fluxnic.net and will be greatly welcome!
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsMaster b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsMaster
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..9145088a
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/GraphicsMaster
@@ -0,0 +1,53 @@
+ADS GraphicsMaster Single Board Computer
+
+For more details, contact Applied Data Systems or see
+http://www.applieddata.net/products.html
+
+The original Linux support for this product has been provided by
+Nicolas Pitre <nico@fluxnic.net>. Continued development work by
+Woojung Huh <whuh@applieddata.net>
+
+Use 'make graphicsmaster_config' before any 'make config'.
+This will set up defaults for GraphicsMaster support.
+
+The kernel zImage is linked to be loaded and executed at 0xc0400000.
+
+Linux can be used with the ADS BootLoader that ships with the
+newer rev boards. See their documentation on how to load Linux.
+
+Supported peripherals:
+- SA1100 LCD frame buffer (8/16bpp...sort of)
+- SA1111 USB Master
+- on-board SMC 92C96 ethernet NIC
+- SA1100 serial port
+- flash memory access (MTD/JFFS)
+- pcmcia, compact flash
+- touchscreen(ucb1200)
+- ps/2 keyboard
+- console on LCD screen
+- serial ports (ttyS[0-2])
+ - ttyS0 is default for serial console
+- Smart I/O (ADC, keypad, digital inputs, etc)
+ See http://www.eurotech-inc.com/linux-sbc.asp for IOCTL documentation
+ and example user space code. ps/2 keybd is multiplexed through this driver
+
+To do:
+- everything else! :-)
+
+Notes:
+
+- The flash on board is divided into 3 partitions. mtd0 is where
+ the zImage is stored. It's been marked as read-only to keep you
+ from blasting over the bootloader. :) mtd1 is
+ for the ramdisk.gz image. mtd2 is user flash space and can be
+ utilized for either JFFS or if you're feeling crazy, running ext2
+ on top of it. If you're not using the ADS bootloader, you're
+ welcome to blast over the mtd1 partition also.
+
+- 16bpp mode requires a different cable than what ships with the board.
+ Contact ADS or look through the manual to wire your own. Currently,
+ if you compile with 16bit mode support and switch into a lower bpp
+ mode, the timing is off so the image is corrupted. This will be
+ fixed soon.
+
+Any contribution can be sent to nico@fluxnic.net and will be greatly welcome!
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/HUW_WEBPANEL b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/HUW_WEBPANEL
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..fd56b48d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/HUW_WEBPANEL
@@ -0,0 +1,17 @@
+The HUW_WEBPANEL is a product of the german company Hoeft & Wessel AG
+
+If you want more information, please visit
+http://www.hoeft-wessel.de
+
+To build the kernel:
+ make huw_webpanel_config
+ make oldconfig
+ [accept all defaults]
+ make zImage
+
+Mostly of the work is done by:
+Roman Jordan jor@hoeft-wessel.de
+Christoph Schulz schu@hoeft-wessel.de
+
+2000/12/18/
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Itsy b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Itsy
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..44b94997
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Itsy
@@ -0,0 +1,39 @@
+Itsy is a research project done by the Western Research Lab, and Systems
+Research Center in Palo Alto, CA. The Itsy project is one of several
+research projects at Compaq that are related to pocket computing.
+
+For more information, see:
+
+ http://www.hpl.hp.com/downloads/crl/itsy/
+
+Notes on initial 2.4 Itsy support (8/27/2000) :
+The port was done on an Itsy version 1.5 machine with a daughtercard with
+64 Meg of DRAM and 32 Meg of Flash. The initial work includes support for
+serial console (to see what you're doing). No other devices have been
+enabled.
+
+To build, do a "make menuconfig" (or xmenuconfig) and select Itsy support.
+Disable Flash and LCD support. and then do a make zImage.
+Finally, you will need to cd to arch/arm/boot/tools and execute a make there
+to build the params-itsy program used to boot the kernel.
+
+In order to install the port of 2.4 to the itsy, You will need to set the
+configuration parameters in the monitor as follows:
+Arg 1:0x08340000, Arg2: 0xC0000000, Arg3:18 (0x12), Arg4:0
+Make sure the start-routine address is set to 0x00060000.
+
+Next, flash the params-itsy program to 0x00060000 ("p 1 0x00060000" in the
+flash menu) Flash the kernel in arch/arm/boot/zImage into 0x08340000
+("p 1 0x00340000"). Finally flash an initial ramdisk into 0xC8000000
+("p 2 0x0") We used ramdisk-2-30.gz from the 0.11 version directory on
+handhelds.org.
+
+The serial connection we established was at:
+ 8-bit data, no parity, 1 stop bit(s), 115200.00 b/s. in the monitor, in the
+params-itsy program, and in the kernel itself. This can be changed, but
+not easily. The monitor parameters are easily changed, the params program
+setup is assembly outl's, and the kernel is a configuration item specific to
+the itsy. (i.e. grep for CONFIG_SA1100_ITSY and you'll find where it is.)
+
+
+This should get you a properly booting 2.4 kernel on the itsy.
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/LART b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/LART
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..6d412b68
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/LART
@@ -0,0 +1,14 @@
+Linux Advanced Radio Terminal (LART)
+------------------------------------
+
+The LART is a small (7.5 x 10cm) SA-1100 board, designed for embedded
+applications. It has 32 MB DRAM, 4MB Flash ROM, double RS232 and all
+other StrongARM-gadgets. Almost all SA signals are directly accessible
+through a number of connectors. The powersupply accepts voltages
+between 3.5V and 16V and is overdimensioned to support a range of
+daughterboards. A quad Ethernet / IDE / PS2 / sound daughterboard
+is under development, with plenty of others in different stages of
+planning.
+
+The hardware designs for this board have been released under an open license;
+see the LART page at http://www.lartmaker.nl/ for more information.
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/PLEB b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/PLEB
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..b9c8a631
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/PLEB
@@ -0,0 +1,11 @@
+The PLEB project was started as a student initiative at the School of
+Computer Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales to make a
+pocket computer capable of running the Linux Kernel.
+
+PLEB support has yet to be fully integrated.
+
+For more information, see:
+
+ http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au
+
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Pangolin b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Pangolin
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..077a6120
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Pangolin
@@ -0,0 +1,23 @@
+Pangolin is a StrongARM 1110-based evaluation platform produced
+by Dialogue Technology (http://www.dialogue.com.tw/).
+It has EISA slots for ease of configuration with SDRAM/Flash
+memory card, USB/Serial/Audio card, Compact Flash card,
+PCMCIA/IDE card and TFT-LCD card.
+
+To compile for Pangolin, you must issue the following commands:
+
+ make pangolin_config
+ make oldconfig
+ make zImage
+
+Supported peripherals:
+- SA1110 serial port (UART1/UART2/UART3)
+- flash memory access
+- compact flash driver
+- UDA1341 sound driver
+- SA1100 LCD controller for 800x600 16bpp TFT-LCD
+- MQ-200 driver for 800x600 16bpp TFT-LCD
+- Penmount(touch panel) driver
+- PCMCIA driver
+- SMC91C94 LAN driver
+- IDE driver (experimental)
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Tifon b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Tifon
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..dd1934d9
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Tifon
@@ -0,0 +1,7 @@
+Tifon
+-----
+
+More info has to come...
+
+Contact: Peter Danielsson <peter.danielsson@era-t.ericsson.se>
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Victor b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Victor
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..9cff415d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Victor
@@ -0,0 +1,16 @@
+Victor is known as a "digital talking book player" manufactured by
+VisuAide, Inc. to be used by blind people.
+
+For more information related to Victor, see:
+
+ http://www.humanware.com/en-usa/products
+
+Of course Victor is using Linux as its main operating system.
+The Victor implementation for Linux is maintained by Nicolas Pitre:
+
+ nico@visuaide.com
+ nico@fluxnic.net
+
+For any comments, please feel free to contact me through the above
+addresses.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Yopy b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Yopy
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..e14f16d8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/Yopy
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+See http://www.yopydeveloper.org for more.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/empeg b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/empeg
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..4ece4849
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/empeg
@@ -0,0 +1,2 @@
+See ../empeg/README
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/nanoEngine b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/nanoEngine
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..48a7934f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/nanoEngine
@@ -0,0 +1,11 @@
+nanoEngine
+----------
+
+"nanoEngine" is a SA1110 based single board computer from
+Bright Star Engineering Inc. See www.brightstareng.com/arm
+for more info.
+(Ref: Stuart Adams <sja@brightstareng.com>)
+
+Also visit Larry Doolittle's "Linux for the nanoEngine" site:
+http://www.brightstareng.com/arm/nanoeng.htm
+
diff --git a/Documentation/arm/SA1100/serial_UART b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/serial_UART
new file mode 100644
index 00000000..a63966f1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/arm/SA1100/serial_UART
@@ -0,0 +1,47 @@
+The SA1100 serial port had its major/minor numbers officially assigned:
+
+> Date: Sun, 24 Sep 2000 21:40:27 -0700
+> From: H. Peter Anvin <hpa@transmeta.com>
+> To: Nicolas Pitre <nico@CAM.ORG>
+> Cc: Device List Maintainer <device@lanana.org>
+> Subject: Re: device
+>
+> Okay. Note that device numbers 204 and 205 are used for "low density
+> serial devices", so you will have a range of minors on those majors (the
+> tty device layer handles this just fine, so you don't have to worry about
+> doing anything special.)
+>
+> So your assignments are:
+>
+> 204 char Low-density serial ports
+> 5 = /dev/ttySA0 SA1100 builtin serial port 0
+> 6 = /dev/ttySA1 SA1100 builtin serial port 1
+> 7 = /dev/ttySA2 SA1100 builtin serial port 2
+>
+> 205 char Low-density serial ports (alternate device)
+> 5 = /dev/cusa0 Callout device for ttySA0
+> 6 = /dev/cusa1 Callout device for ttySA1
+> 7 = /dev/cusa2 Callout device for ttySA2
+>
+
+You must create those inodes in /dev on the root filesystem used
+by your SA1100-based device:
+
+ mknod ttySA0 c 204 5
+ mknod ttySA1 c 204 6
+ mknod ttySA2 c 204 7
+ mknod cusa0 c 205 5
+ mknod cusa1 c 205 6
+ mknod cusa2 c 205 7
+
+In addition to the creation of the appropriate device nodes above, you
+must ensure your user space applications make use of the correct device
+name. The classic example is the content of the /etc/inittab file where
+you might have a getty process started on ttyS0. In this case:
+
+- replace occurrences of ttyS0 with ttySA0, ttyS1 with ttySA1, etc.
+
+- don't forget to add 'ttySA0', 'console', or the appropriate tty name
+ in /etc/securetty for root to be allowed to login as well.
+
+