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authorPeter Maydell <peter.maydell@linaro.org>2020-03-06 10:25:47 +0000
committerPeter Maydell <peter.maydell@linaro.org>2020-03-06 11:06:55 +0000
commit29f9dff79073cfdc336466a950294be91b90f514 (patch)
tree8d56c6fc38f2568e5d2b2f75a8e088aa10bca1a7
parent3a8273b1ab3299cf92f7f72b41f56471ecb8e5cf (diff)
downloadqemu-arm-pull-docs-20200306.tar.gz
*.hx: Remove all the STEXI/ETEXI blockspull-docs-20200306
We no longer generate texinfo from the hxtool input files, so delete all the STEXI/ETEXI blocks. This commit was created using the following Perl one-liner: perl -i -n -e '$suppress = 1,next if /^STEXI/;$suppress=0,next if /^ETEXI/; print if !$suppress;' *.hx Signed-off-by: Peter Maydell <peter.maydell@linaro.org>
-rw-r--r--hmp-commands-info.hx329
-rw-r--r--hmp-commands.hx821
-rw-r--r--qemu-options.hx4075
3 files changed, 0 insertions, 5225 deletions
diff --git a/hmp-commands-info.hx b/hmp-commands-info.hx
index 1730f866cd..499d6d54b0 100644
--- a/hmp-commands-info.hx
+++ b/hmp-commands-info.hx
@@ -11,13 +11,6 @@ HXCOMM appears inside the documentation list item for the top level
HXCOMM "info" documentation entry. The exception is the first SRST
HXCOMM fragment that defines that top level entry.
-STEXI
-@table @option
-@item info @var{subcommand}
-@findex info
-Show various information about the system state.
-@table @option
-ETEXI
SRST
``info`` *subcommand*
Show various information about the system state.
@@ -33,11 +26,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info version
-@findex info version
-Show the version of QEMU.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info version``
Show the version of QEMU.
@@ -51,11 +39,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_network,
},
-STEXI
-@item info network
-@findex info network
-Show the network state.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info network``
Show the network state.
@@ -70,11 +53,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info chardev
-@findex info chardev
-Show the character devices.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info chardev``
Show the character devices.
@@ -89,11 +67,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_block,
},
-STEXI
-@item info block
-@findex info block
-Show info of one block device or all block devices.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info block``
Show info of one block device or all block devices.
@@ -107,11 +80,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_blockstats,
},
-STEXI
-@item info blockstats
-@findex info blockstats
-Show block device statistics.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info blockstats``
Show block device statistics.
@@ -125,11 +93,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_block_jobs,
},
-STEXI
-@item info block-jobs
-@findex info block-jobs
-Show progress of ongoing block device operations.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info block-jobs``
Show progress of ongoing block device operations.
@@ -143,11 +106,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_registers,
},
-STEXI
-@item info registers
-@findex info registers
-Show the cpu registers.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info registers``
Show the cpu registers.
@@ -164,11 +122,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info lapic
-@findex info lapic
-Show local APIC state
-ETEXI
SRST
``info lapic``
Show local APIC state
@@ -184,11 +137,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info ioapic
-@findex info ioapic
-Show io APIC state
-ETEXI
SRST
``info ioapic``
Show io APIC state
@@ -202,11 +150,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_cpus,
},
-STEXI
-@item info cpus
-@findex info cpus
-Show infos for each CPU.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info cpus``
Show infos for each CPU.
@@ -221,11 +164,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info history
-@findex info history
-Show the command line history.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info history``
Show the command line history.
@@ -239,11 +177,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_irq,
},
-STEXI
-@item info irq
-@findex info irq
-Show the interrupts statistics (if available).
-ETEXI
SRST
``info irq``
Show the interrupts statistics (if available).
@@ -257,11 +190,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_pic,
},
-STEXI
-@item info pic
-@findex info pic
-Show PIC state.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info pic``
Show PIC state.
@@ -275,11 +203,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_rdma,
},
-STEXI
-@item info rdma
-@findex info rdma
-Show RDMA state.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info rdma``
Show RDMA state.
@@ -293,11 +216,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_pci,
},
-STEXI
-@item info pci
-@findex info pci
-Show PCI information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info pci``
Show PCI information.
@@ -314,11 +232,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info tlb
-@findex info tlb
-Show virtual to physical memory mappings.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info tlb``
Show virtual to physical memory mappings.
@@ -334,11 +247,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info mem
-@findex info mem
-Show the active virtual memory mappings.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info mem``
Show the active virtual memory mappings.
@@ -354,11 +262,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_mtree,
},
-STEXI
-@item info mtree
-@findex info mtree
-Show memory tree.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info mtree``
Show memory tree.
@@ -374,11 +277,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info jit
-@findex info jit
-Show dynamic compiler info.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info jit``
Show dynamic compiler info.
@@ -394,11 +292,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info opcount
-@findex info opcount
-Show dynamic compiler opcode counters
-ETEXI
SRST
``info opcount``
Show dynamic compiler opcode counters
@@ -415,16 +308,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_sync_profile,
},
-STEXI
-@item info sync-profile [-m|-n] [@var{max}]
-@findex info sync-profile
-Show synchronization profiling info, up to @var{max} entries (default: 10),
-sorted by total wait time.
- -m: sort by mean wait time
- -n: do not coalesce objects with the same call site
-When different objects that share the same call site are coalesced, the "Object"
-field shows---enclosed in brackets---the number of objects being coalesced.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info sync-profile [-m|-n]`` [*max*]
Show synchronization profiling info, up to *max* entries (default: 10),
@@ -448,11 +331,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_kvm,
},
-STEXI
-@item info kvm
-@findex info kvm
-Show KVM information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info kvm``
Show KVM information.
@@ -466,11 +344,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_numa,
},
-STEXI
-@item info numa
-@findex info numa
-Show NUMA information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info numa``
Show NUMA information.
@@ -484,11 +357,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_usb,
},
-STEXI
-@item info usb
-@findex info usb
-Show guest USB devices.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info usb``
Show guest USB devices.
@@ -502,11 +370,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_usbhost,
},
-STEXI
-@item info usbhost
-@findex info usbhost
-Show host USB devices.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info usbhost``
Show host USB devices.
@@ -520,11 +383,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_profile,
},
-STEXI
-@item info profile
-@findex info profile
-Show profiling information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info profile``
Show profiling information.
@@ -538,11 +396,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_capture,
},
-STEXI
-@item info capture
-@findex info capture
-Show capture information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info capture``
Show capture information.
@@ -556,11 +409,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_snapshots,
},
-STEXI
-@item info snapshots
-@findex info snapshots
-Show the currently saved VM snapshots.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info snapshots``
Show the currently saved VM snapshots.
@@ -575,11 +423,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info status
-@findex info status
-Show the current VM status (running|paused).
-ETEXI
SRST
``info status``
Show the current VM status (running|paused).
@@ -593,11 +436,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_mice,
},
-STEXI
-@item info mice
-@findex info mice
-Show which guest mouse is receiving events.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info mice``
Show which guest mouse is receiving events.
@@ -613,11 +451,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info vnc
-@findex info vnc
-Show the vnc server status.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info vnc``
Show the vnc server status.
@@ -633,11 +466,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info spice
-@findex info spice
-Show the spice server status.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info spice``
Show the spice server status.
@@ -652,11 +480,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info name
-@findex info name
-Show the current VM name.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info name``
Show the current VM name.
@@ -671,11 +494,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info uuid
-@findex info uuid
-Show the current VM UUID.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info uuid``
Show the current VM UUID.
@@ -689,11 +507,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_cpustats,
},
-STEXI
-@item info cpustats
-@findex info cpustats
-Show CPU statistics.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info cpustats``
Show CPU statistics.
@@ -709,11 +522,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info usernet
-@findex info usernet
-Show user network stack connection states.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info usernet``
Show user network stack connection states.
@@ -727,11 +535,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_migrate,
},
-STEXI
-@item info migrate
-@findex info migrate
-Show migration status.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info migrate``
Show migration status.
@@ -745,11 +548,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_migrate_capabilities,
},
-STEXI
-@item info migrate_capabilities
-@findex info migrate_capabilities
-Show current migration capabilities.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info migrate_capabilities``
Show current migration capabilities.
@@ -763,11 +561,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_migrate_parameters,
},
-STEXI
-@item info migrate_parameters
-@findex info migrate_parameters
-Show current migration parameters.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info migrate_parameters``
Show current migration parameters.
@@ -781,11 +574,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_migrate_cache_size,
},
-STEXI
-@item info migrate_cache_size
-@findex info migrate_cache_size
-Show current migration xbzrle cache size.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info migrate_cache_size``
Show current migration xbzrle cache size.
@@ -799,11 +587,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_balloon,
},
-STEXI
-@item info balloon
-@findex info balloon
-Show balloon information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info balloon``
Show balloon information.
@@ -817,11 +600,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_qtree,
},
-STEXI
-@item info qtree
-@findex info qtree
-Show device tree.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info qtree``
Show device tree.
@@ -835,11 +613,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_qdm,
},
-STEXI
-@item info qdm
-@findex info qdm
-Show qdev device model list.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info qdm``
Show qdev device model list.
@@ -854,11 +627,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info qom-tree
-@findex info qom-tree
-Show QOM composition tree.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info qom-tree``
Show QOM composition tree.
@@ -872,11 +640,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_roms,
},
-STEXI
-@item info roms
-@findex info roms
-Show roms.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info roms``
Show roms.
@@ -892,11 +655,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = info_trace_events_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item info trace-events
-@findex info trace-events
-Show available trace-events & their state.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info trace-events``
Show available trace-events & their state.
@@ -910,11 +668,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_tpm,
},
-STEXI
-@item info tpm
-@findex info tpm
-Show the TPM device.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info tpm``
Show the TPM device.
@@ -929,11 +682,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info memdev
-@findex info memdev
-Show memory backends
-ETEXI
SRST
``info memdev``
Show memory backends
@@ -947,11 +695,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_memory_devices,
},
-STEXI
-@item info memory-devices
-@findex info memory-devices
-Show memory devices.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info memory-devices``
Show memory devices.
@@ -966,11 +709,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info iothreads
-@findex info iothreads
-Show iothread's identifiers.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info iothreads``
Show iothread's identifiers.
@@ -984,11 +722,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_rocker,
},
-STEXI
-@item info rocker @var{name}
-@findex info rocker
-Show rocker switch.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info rocker`` *name*
Show rocker switch.
@@ -1002,11 +735,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_rocker_ports,
},
-STEXI
-@item info rocker-ports @var{name}-ports
-@findex info rocker-ports
-Show rocker ports.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info rocker-ports`` *name*-ports
Show rocker ports.
@@ -1020,11 +748,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_rocker_of_dpa_flows,
},
-STEXI
-@item info rocker-of-dpa-flows @var{name} [@var{tbl_id}]
-@findex info rocker-of-dpa-flows
-Show rocker OF-DPA flow tables.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info rocker-of-dpa-flows`` *name* [*tbl_id*]
Show rocker OF-DPA flow tables.
@@ -1038,11 +761,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_rocker_of_dpa_groups,
},
-STEXI
-@item info rocker-of-dpa-groups @var{name} [@var{type}]
-@findex info rocker-of-dpa-groups
-Show rocker OF-DPA groups.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info rocker-of-dpa-groups`` *name* [*type*]
Show rocker OF-DPA groups.
@@ -1058,11 +776,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info skeys @var{address}
-@findex info skeys
-Display the value of a storage key (s390 only)
-ETEXI
SRST
``info skeys`` *address*
Display the value of a storage key (s390 only)
@@ -1078,11 +791,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info cmma @var{address}
-@findex info cmma
-Display the values of the CMMA storage attributes for a range of pages (s390 only)
-ETEXI
SRST
``info cmma`` *address*
Display the values of the CMMA storage attributes for a range of
@@ -1097,11 +805,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_dump,
},
-STEXI
-@item info dump
-@findex info dump
-Display the latest dump status.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info dump``
Display the latest dump status.
@@ -1115,11 +818,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_ramblock,
},
-STEXI
-@item info ramblock
-@findex info ramblock
-Dump all the ramblocks of the system.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info ramblock``
Dump all the ramblocks of the system.
@@ -1134,11 +832,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item info hotpluggable-cpus
-@findex info hotpluggable-cpus
-Show information about hotpluggable CPUs
-ETEXI
SRST
``info hotpluggable-cpus``
Show information about hotpluggable CPUs
@@ -1152,11 +845,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_vm_generation_id,
},
-STEXI
-@item info vm-generation-id
-@findex info vm-generation-id
-Show Virtual Machine Generation ID
-ETEXI
SRST
``info vm-generation-id``
Show Virtual Machine Generation ID
@@ -1171,12 +859,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_info_memory_size_summary,
},
-STEXI
-@item info memory_size_summary
-@findex info memory_size_summary
-Display the amount of initially allocated and present hotpluggable (if
-enabled) memory in bytes.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info memory_size_summary``
Display the amount of initially allocated and present hotpluggable (if
@@ -1193,20 +875,9 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item info sev
-@findex info sev
-Show SEV information.
-ETEXI
SRST
``info sev``
Show SEV information.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
diff --git a/hmp-commands.hx b/hmp-commands.hx
index 9aa59f5231..eb3d1605fd 100644
--- a/hmp-commands.hx
+++ b/hmp-commands.hx
@@ -5,9 +5,6 @@ HXCOMM DEF(command, args, callback, arg_string, help) is used to construct
HXCOMM monitor commands
HXCOMM HXCOMM can be used for comments, discarded from both texi and C
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
{
.name = "help|?",
@@ -18,11 +15,6 @@ ETEXI
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item help or ? [@var{cmd}]
-@findex help
-Show the help for all commands or just for command @var{cmd}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``help`` or ``?`` [*cmd*]
Show the help for all commands or just for command *cmd*.
@@ -36,16 +28,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_commit,
},
-STEXI
-@item commit
-@findex commit
-Commit changes to the disk images (if -snapshot is used) or backing files.
-If the backing file is smaller than the snapshot, then the backing file will be
-resized to be the same size as the snapshot. If the snapshot is smaller than
-the backing file, the backing file will not be truncated. If you want the
-backing file to match the size of the smaller snapshot, you can safely truncate
-it yourself once the commit operation successfully completes.
-ETEXI
SRST
``commit``
Commit changes to the disk images (if -snapshot is used) or backing files.
@@ -65,11 +47,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_quit,
},
-STEXI
-@item q or quit
-@findex quit
-Quit the emulator.
-ETEXI
SRST
``q`` or ``quit``
Quit the emulator.
@@ -84,15 +61,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item exit_preconfig
-@findex exit_preconfig
-This command makes QEMU exit the preconfig state and proceed with
-VM initialization using configuration data provided on the command line
-and via the QMP monitor during the preconfig state. The command is only
-available during the preconfig state (i.e. when the --preconfig command
-line option was in use).
-ETEXI
SRST
``exit_preconfig``
This command makes QEMU exit the preconfig state and proceed with
@@ -110,14 +78,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_resize,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_resize
-@findex block_resize
-Resize a block image while a guest is running. Usually requires guest
-action to see the updated size. Resize to a lower size is supported,
-but should be used with extreme caution. Note that this command only
-resizes image files, it can not resize block devices like LVM volumes.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_resize``
Resize a block image while a guest is running. Usually requires guest
@@ -134,11 +94,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_stream,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_stream
-@findex block_stream
-Copy data from a backing file into a block device.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_stream``
Copy data from a backing file into a block device.
@@ -152,11 +107,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_job_set_speed,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_job_set_speed
-@findex block_job_set_speed
-Set maximum speed for a background block operation.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_job_set_speed``
Set maximum speed for a background block operation.
@@ -172,11 +122,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_job_cancel,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_job_cancel
-@findex block_job_cancel
-Stop an active background block operation (streaming, mirroring).
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_job_cancel``
Stop an active background block operation (streaming, mirroring).
@@ -190,12 +135,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_job_complete,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_job_complete
-@findex block_job_complete
-Manually trigger completion of an active background block operation.
-For mirroring, this will switch the device to the destination path.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_job_complete``
Manually trigger completion of an active background block operation.
@@ -210,11 +149,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_job_pause,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_job_pause
-@findex block_job_pause
-Pause an active block streaming operation.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_job_pause``
Pause an active block streaming operation.
@@ -228,11 +162,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_job_resume,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_job_resume
-@findex block_job_resume
-Resume a paused block streaming operation.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_job_resume``
Resume a paused block streaming operation.
@@ -246,11 +175,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_eject,
},
-STEXI
-@item eject [-f] @var{device}
-@findex eject
-Eject a removable medium (use -f to force it).
-ETEXI
SRST
``eject [-f]`` *device*
Eject a removable medium (use -f to force it).
@@ -264,16 +188,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_drive_del,
},
-STEXI
-@item drive_del @var{device}
-@findex drive_del
-Remove host block device. The result is that guest generated IO is no longer
-submitted against the host device underlying the disk. Once a drive has
-been deleted, the QEMU Block layer returns -EIO which results in IO
-errors in the guest for applications that are reading/writing to the device.
-These errors are always reported to the guest, regardless of the drive's error
-actions (drive options rerror, werror).
-ETEXI
SRST
``drive_del`` *device*
Remove host block device. The result is that guest generated IO is no longer
@@ -292,56 +206,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_change,
},
-STEXI
-@item change @var{device} @var{setting}
-@findex change
-Change the configuration of a device.
-
-@table @option
-@item change @var{diskdevice} @var{filename} [@var{format} [@var{read-only-mode}]]
-Change the medium for a removable disk device to point to @var{filename}. eg
-
-@example
-(qemu) change ide1-cd0 /path/to/some.iso
-@end example
-
-@var{format} is optional.
-
-@var{read-only-mode} may be used to change the read-only status of the device.
-It accepts the following values:
-
-@table @var
-@item retain
-Retains the current status; this is the default.
-
-@item read-only
-Makes the device read-only.
-
-@item read-write
-Makes the device writable.
-@end table
-
-@item change vnc @var{display},@var{options}
-Change the configuration of the VNC server. The valid syntax for @var{display}
-and @var{options} are described at @ref{sec_invocation}. eg
-
-@example
-(qemu) change vnc localhost:1
-@end example
-
-@item change vnc password [@var{password}]
-
-Change the password associated with the VNC server. If the new password is not
-supplied, the monitor will prompt for it to be entered. VNC passwords are only
-significant up to 8 letters. eg
-
-@example
-(qemu) change vnc password
-Password: ********
-@end example
-
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``change`` *device* *setting*
Change the configuration of a device.
@@ -391,11 +255,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_screendump,
},
-STEXI
-@item screendump @var{filename}
-@findex screendump
-Save screen into PPM image @var{filename}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``screendump`` *filename*
Save screen into PPM image *filename*.
@@ -409,11 +268,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_logfile,
},
-STEXI
-@item logfile @var{filename}
-@findex logfile
-Output logs to @var{filename}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``logfile`` *filename*
Output logs to *filename*.
@@ -429,11 +283,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = trace_event_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item trace-event
-@findex trace-event
-changes status of a trace event
-ETEXI
SRST
``trace-event``
changes status of a trace event
@@ -448,11 +297,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_trace_file,
},
-STEXI
-@item trace-file on|off|flush
-@findex trace-file
-Open, close, or flush the trace file. If no argument is given, the status of the trace file is displayed.
-ETEXI
SRST
``trace-file on|off|flush``
Open, close, or flush the trace file. If no argument is given, the
@@ -468,11 +312,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_log,
},
-STEXI
-@item log @var{item1}[,...]
-@findex log
-Activate logging of the specified items.
-ETEXI
SRST
``log`` *item1*\ [,...]
Activate logging of the specified items.
@@ -486,17 +325,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_savevm,
},
-STEXI
-@item savevm @var{tag}
-@findex savevm
-Create a snapshot of the whole virtual machine. If @var{tag} is
-provided, it is used as human readable identifier. If there is already
-a snapshot with the same tag, it is replaced. More info at
-@ref{vm_snapshots}.
-
-Since 4.0, savevm stopped allowing the snapshot id to be set, accepting
-only @var{tag} as parameter.
-ETEXI
SRST
``savevm`` *tag*
Create a snapshot of the whole virtual machine. If *tag* is
@@ -517,14 +345,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = loadvm_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item loadvm @var{tag}
-@findex loadvm
-Set the whole virtual machine to the snapshot identified by the tag
-@var{tag}.
-
-Since 4.0, loadvm stopped accepting snapshot id as parameter.
-ETEXI
SRST
``loadvm`` *tag*
Set the whole virtual machine to the snapshot identified by the tag
@@ -542,14 +362,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = delvm_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item delvm @var{tag}
-@findex delvm
-Delete the snapshot identified by @var{tag}.
-
-Since 4.0, delvm stopped deleting snapshots by snapshot id, accepting
-only @var{tag} as parameter.
-ETEXI
SRST
``delvm`` *tag*
Delete the snapshot identified by *tag*.
@@ -566,12 +378,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_singlestep,
},
-STEXI
-@item singlestep [off]
-@findex singlestep
-Run the emulation in single step mode.
-If called with option off, the emulation returns to normal mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``singlestep [off]``
Run the emulation in single step mode.
@@ -586,11 +392,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_stop,
},
-STEXI
-@item stop
-@findex stop
-Stop emulation.
-ETEXI
SRST
``stop``
Stop emulation.
@@ -604,11 +405,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_cont,
},
-STEXI
-@item c or cont
-@findex cont
-Resume emulation.
-ETEXI
SRST
``c`` or ``cont``
Resume emulation.
@@ -622,11 +418,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_system_wakeup,
},
-STEXI
-@item system_wakeup
-@findex system_wakeup
-Wakeup guest from suspend.
-ETEXI
SRST
``system_wakeup``
Wakeup guest from suspend.
@@ -640,11 +431,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_gdbserver,
},
-STEXI
-@item gdbserver [@var{port}]
-@findex gdbserver
-Start gdbserver session (default @var{port}=1234)
-ETEXI
SRST
``gdbserver`` [*port*]
Start gdbserver session (default *port*\=1234)
@@ -658,11 +444,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_memory_dump,
},
-STEXI
-@item x/fmt @var{addr}
-@findex x
-Virtual memory dump starting at @var{addr}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``x/``\ *fmt* *addr*
Virtual memory dump starting at *addr*.
@@ -676,64 +457,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_physical_memory_dump,
},
-STEXI
-@item xp /@var{fmt} @var{addr}
-@findex xp
-Physical memory dump starting at @var{addr}.
-
-@var{fmt} is a format which tells the command how to format the
-data. Its syntax is: @option{/@{count@}@{format@}@{size@}}
-
-@table @var
-@item count
-is the number of items to be dumped.
-
-@item format
-can be x (hex), d (signed decimal), u (unsigned decimal), o (octal),
-c (char) or i (asm instruction).
-
-@item size
-can be b (8 bits), h (16 bits), w (32 bits) or g (64 bits). On x86,
-@code{h} or @code{w} can be specified with the @code{i} format to
-respectively select 16 or 32 bit code instruction size.
-
-@end table
-
-Examples:
-@itemize
-@item
-Dump 10 instructions at the current instruction pointer:
-@example
-(qemu) x/10i $eip
-0x90107063: ret
-0x90107064: sti
-0x90107065: lea 0x0(%esi,1),%esi
-0x90107069: lea 0x0(%edi,1),%edi
-0x90107070: ret
-0x90107071: jmp 0x90107080
-0x90107073: nop
-0x90107074: nop
-0x90107075: nop
-0x90107076: nop
-@end example
-
-@item
-Dump 80 16 bit values at the start of the video memory.
-@smallexample
-(qemu) xp/80hx 0xb8000
-0x000b8000: 0x0b50 0x0b6c 0x0b65 0x0b78 0x0b38 0x0b36 0x0b2f 0x0b42
-0x000b8010: 0x0b6f 0x0b63 0x0b68 0x0b73 0x0b20 0x0b56 0x0b47 0x0b41
-0x000b8020: 0x0b42 0x0b69 0x0b6f 0x0b73 0x0b20 0x0b63 0x0b75 0x0b72
-0x000b8030: 0x0b72 0x0b65 0x0b6e 0x0b74 0x0b2d 0x0b63 0x0b76 0x0b73
-0x000b8040: 0x0b20 0x0b30 0x0b35 0x0b20 0x0b4e 0x0b6f 0x0b76 0x0b20
-0x000b8050: 0x0b32 0x0b30 0x0b30 0x0b33 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720
-0x000b8060: 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720
-0x000b8070: 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720
-0x000b8080: 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720
-0x000b8090: 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720 0x0720
-@end smallexample
-@end itemize
-ETEXI
SRST
``xp /``\ *fmt* *addr*
Physical memory dump starting at *addr*.
@@ -791,12 +514,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_gpa2hva,
},
-STEXI
-@item gpa2hva @var{addr}
-@findex gpa2hva
-Print the host virtual address at which the guest's physical address @var{addr}
-is mapped.
-ETEXI
SRST
``gpa2hva`` *addr*
Print the host virtual address at which the guest's physical address *addr*
@@ -813,12 +530,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item gpa2hpa @var{addr}
-@findex gpa2hpa
-Print the host physical address at which the guest's physical address @var{addr}
-is mapped.
-ETEXI
SRST
``gpa2hpa`` *addr*
Print the host physical address at which the guest's physical address *addr*
@@ -833,12 +544,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_gva2gpa,
},
-STEXI
-@item gva2gpa @var{addr}
-@findex gva2gpa
-Print the guest physical address at which the guest's virtual address @var{addr}
-is mapped based on the mapping for the current CPU.
-ETEXI
SRST
``gva2gpa`` *addr*
Print the guest physical address at which the guest's virtual address *addr*
@@ -853,12 +558,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = do_print,
},
-STEXI
-@item p or print/@var{fmt} @var{expr}
-@findex print
-Print expression value. Only the @var{format} part of @var{fmt} is
-used.
-ETEXI
SRST
``p`` or ``print/``\ *fmt* *expr*
Print expression value. Only the *format* part of *fmt* is
@@ -873,11 +572,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_ioport_read,
},
-STEXI
-@item i/@var{fmt} @var{addr} [.@var{index}]
-@findex i
-Read I/O port.
-ETEXI
SRST
``i/``\ *fmt* *addr* [.\ *index*\ ]
Read I/O port.
@@ -891,11 +585,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_ioport_write,
},
-STEXI
-@item o/@var{fmt} @var{addr} @var{val}
-@findex o
-Write to I/O port.
-ETEXI
SRST
``o/``\ *fmt* *addr* *val*
Write to I/O port.
@@ -910,19 +599,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = sendkey_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item sendkey @var{keys}
-@findex sendkey
-Send @var{keys} to the guest. @var{keys} could be the name of the
-key or the raw value in hexadecimal format. Use @code{-} to press
-several keys simultaneously. Example:
-@example
-sendkey ctrl-alt-f1
-@end example
-
-This command is useful to send keys that your graphical user interface
-intercepts at low level, such as @code{ctrl-alt-f1} in X Window.
-ETEXI
SRST
``sendkey`` *keys*
Send *keys* to the guest. *keys* could be the name of the
@@ -943,12 +619,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_sync_profile,
},
-STEXI
-@item sync-profile [on|off|reset]
-@findex sync-profile
-Enable, disable or reset synchronization profiling. With no arguments, prints
-whether profiling is on or off.
-ETEXI
SRST
``sync-profile [on|off|reset]``
Enable, disable or reset synchronization profiling. With no arguments, prints
@@ -963,11 +633,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_system_reset,
},
-STEXI
-@item system_reset
-@findex system_reset
-Reset the system.
-ETEXI
SRST
``system_reset``
Reset the system.
@@ -981,11 +646,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_system_powerdown,
},
-STEXI
-@item system_powerdown
-@findex system_powerdown
-Power down the system (if supported).
-ETEXI
SRST
``system_powerdown``
Power down the system (if supported).
@@ -999,11 +659,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_sum,
},
-STEXI
-@item sum @var{addr} @var{size}
-@findex sum
-Compute the checksum of a memory region.
-ETEXI
SRST
``sum`` *addr* *size*
Compute the checksum of a memory region.
@@ -1018,11 +673,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = device_add_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item device_add @var{config}
-@findex device_add
-Add device.
-ETEXI
SRST
``device_add`` *config*
Add device.
@@ -1037,12 +687,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = device_del_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item device_del @var{id}
-@findex device_del
-Remove device @var{id}. @var{id} may be a short ID
-or a QOM object path.
-ETEXI
SRST
``device_del`` *id*
Remove device *id*. *id* may be a short ID
@@ -1057,11 +701,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_cpu,
},
-STEXI
-@item cpu @var{index}
-@findex cpu
-Set the default CPU.
-ETEXI
SRST
``cpu`` *index*
Set the default CPU.
@@ -1075,12 +714,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_mouse_move,
},
-STEXI
-@item mouse_move @var{dx} @var{dy} [@var{dz}]
-@findex mouse_move
-Move the active mouse to the specified coordinates @var{dx} @var{dy}
-with optional scroll axis @var{dz}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``mouse_move`` *dx* *dy* [*dz*]
Move the active mouse to the specified coordinates *dx* *dy*
@@ -1095,11 +728,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_mouse_button,
},
-STEXI
-@item mouse_button @var{val}
-@findex mouse_button
-Change the active mouse button state @var{val} (1=L, 2=M, 4=R).
-ETEXI
SRST
``mouse_button`` *val*
Change the active mouse button state *val* (1=L, 2=M, 4=R).
@@ -1113,15 +741,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_mouse_set,
},
-STEXI
-@item mouse_set @var{index}
-@findex mouse_set
-Set which mouse device receives events at given @var{index}, index
-can be obtained with
-@example
-info mice
-@end example
-ETEXI
SRST
``mouse_set`` *index*
Set which mouse device receives events at given *index*, index
@@ -1138,20 +757,6 @@ ERST
.help = "capture audio to a wave file (default frequency=44100 bits=16 channels=2)",
.cmd = hmp_wavcapture,
},
-STEXI
-@item wavcapture @var{filename} @var{audiodev} [@var{frequency} [@var{bits} [@var{channels}]]]
-@findex wavcapture
-Capture audio into @var{filename} from @var{audiodev}, using sample rate
-@var{frequency} bits per sample @var{bits} and number of channels
-@var{channels}.
-
-Defaults:
-@itemize @minus
-@item Sample rate = 44100 Hz - CD quality
-@item Bits = 16
-@item Number of channels = 2 - Stereo
-@end itemize
-ETEXI
SRST
``wavcapture`` *filename* *audiodev* [*frequency* [*bits* [*channels*]]]
Capture audio into *filename* from *audiodev*, using sample rate
@@ -1172,14 +777,6 @@ ERST
.help = "stop capture",
.cmd = hmp_stopcapture,
},
-STEXI
-@item stopcapture @var{index}
-@findex stopcapture
-Stop capture with a given @var{index}, index can be obtained with
-@example
-info capture
-@end example
-ETEXI
SRST
``stopcapture`` *index*
Stop capture with a given *index*, index can be obtained with::
@@ -1196,11 +793,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_memsave,
},
-STEXI
-@item memsave @var{addr} @var{size} @var{file}
-@findex memsave
-save to disk virtual memory dump starting at @var{addr} of size @var{size}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``memsave`` *addr* *size* *file*
save to disk virtual memory dump starting at *addr* of size *size*.
@@ -1214,11 +806,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_pmemsave,
},
-STEXI
-@item pmemsave @var{addr} @var{size} @var{file}
-@findex pmemsave
-save to disk physical memory dump starting at @var{addr} of size @var{size}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``pmemsave`` *addr* *size* *file*
save to disk physical memory dump starting at *addr* of size *size*.
@@ -1232,15 +819,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_boot_set,
},
-STEXI
-@item boot_set @var{bootdevicelist}
-@findex boot_set
-Define new values for the boot device list. Those values will override
-the values specified on the command line through the @code{-boot} option.
-
-The values that can be specified here depend on the machine type, but are
-the same that can be specified in the @code{-boot} command line option.
-ETEXI
SRST
``boot_set`` *bootdevicelist*
Define new values for the boot device list. Those values will override
@@ -1257,12 +835,6 @@ ERST
.help = "inject an NMI",
.cmd = hmp_nmi,
},
-STEXI
-@item nmi @var{cpu}
-@findex nmi
-Inject an NMI on the default CPU (x86/s390) or all CPUs (ppc64).
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``nmi`` *cpu*
Inject an NMI on the default CPU (x86/s390) or all CPUs (ppc64).
@@ -1277,13 +849,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = ringbuf_write_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item ringbuf_write @var{device} @var{data}
-@findex ringbuf_write
-Write @var{data} to ring buffer character device @var{device}.
-@var{data} must be a UTF-8 string.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``ringbuf_write`` *device* *data*
Write *data* to ring buffer character device *device*.
@@ -1299,18 +864,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = ringbuf_write_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item ringbuf_read @var{device}
-@findex ringbuf_read
-Read and print up to @var{size} bytes from ring buffer character
-device @var{device}.
-Certain non-printable characters are printed \uXXXX, where XXXX is the
-character code in hexadecimal. Character \ is printed \\.
-Bug: can screw up when the buffer contains invalid UTF-8 sequences,
-NUL characters, after the ring buffer lost data, and when reading
-stops because the size limit is reached.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``ringbuf_read`` *device*
Read and print up to *size* bytes from ring buffer character
@@ -1330,16 +883,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_announce_self,
},
-STEXI
-@item announce_self
-@findex announce_self
-Trigger a round of GARP/RARP broadcasts; this is useful for explicitly updating the
-network infrastructure after a reconfiguration or some forms of migration.
-The timings of the round are set by the migration announce parameters.
-An optional comma separated @var{interfaces} list restricts the announce to the
-named set of interfaces. An optional @var{id} can be used to start a separate announce
-timer and to change the parameters of it later.
-ETEXI
SRST
``announce_self``
Trigger a round of GARP/RARP broadcasts; this is useful for explicitly
@@ -1364,13 +907,6 @@ ERST
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate [-d] [-b] [-i] @var{uri}
-@findex migrate
-Migrate to @var{uri} (using -d to not wait for completion).
- -b for migration with full copy of disk
- -i for migration with incremental copy of disk (base image is shared)
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate [-d] [-b] [-i]`` *uri*
Migrate to *uri* (using -d to not wait for completion).
@@ -1389,11 +925,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_cancel,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_cancel
-@findex migrate_cancel
-Cancel the current VM migration.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_cancel``
Cancel the current VM migration.
@@ -1406,11 +937,6 @@ ERST
.help = "Continue migration from the given paused state",
.cmd = hmp_migrate_continue,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_continue @var{state}
-@findex migrate_continue
-Continue migration from the paused state @var{state}
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_continue`` *state*
Continue migration from the paused state *state*
@@ -1424,12 +950,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_incoming,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_incoming @var{uri}
-@findex migrate_incoming
-Continue an incoming migration using the @var{uri} (that has the same syntax
-as the -incoming option).
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_incoming`` *uri*
Continue an incoming migration using the *uri* (that has the same syntax
@@ -1444,11 +964,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_recover,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_recover @var{uri}
-@findex migrate_recover
-Continue a paused incoming postcopy migration using the @var{uri}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_recover`` *uri*
Continue a paused incoming postcopy migration using the *uri*.
@@ -1462,11 +977,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_pause,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_pause
-@findex migrate_pause
-Pause an ongoing migration. Currently it only supports postcopy.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_pause``
Pause an ongoing migration. Currently it only supports postcopy.
@@ -1485,11 +995,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_set_cache_size,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_set_cache_size @var{value}
-@findex migrate_set_cache_size
-Set cache size to @var{value} (in bytes) for xbzrle migrations.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_set_cache_size`` *value*
Set cache size to *value* (in bytes) for xbzrle migrations.
@@ -1504,11 +1009,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_set_speed,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_set_speed @var{value}
-@findex migrate_set_speed
-Set maximum speed to @var{value} (in bytes) for migrations.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_set_speed`` *value*
Set maximum speed to *value* (in bytes) for migrations.
@@ -1522,11 +1022,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_set_downtime,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_set_downtime @var{second}
-@findex migrate_set_downtime
-Set maximum tolerated downtime (in seconds) for migration.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_set_downtime`` *second*
Set maximum tolerated downtime (in seconds) for migration.
@@ -1541,11 +1036,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = migrate_set_capability_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_set_capability @var{capability} @var{state}
-@findex migrate_set_capability
-Enable/Disable the usage of a capability @var{capability} for migration.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_set_capability`` *capability* *state*
Enable/Disable the usage of a capability *capability* for migration.
@@ -1560,11 +1050,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = migrate_set_parameter_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_set_parameter @var{parameter} @var{value}
-@findex migrate_set_parameter
-Set the parameter @var{parameter} for migration.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_set_parameter`` *parameter* *value*
Set the parameter *parameter* for migration.
@@ -1581,12 +1066,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_migrate_start_postcopy,
},
-STEXI
-@item migrate_start_postcopy
-@findex migrate_start_postcopy
-Switch in-progress migration to postcopy mode. Ignored after the end of
-migration (or once already in postcopy).
-ETEXI
SRST
``migrate_start_postcopy``
Switch in-progress migration to postcopy mode. Ignored after the end of
@@ -1602,11 +1081,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_x_colo_lost_heartbeat,
},
-STEXI
-@item x_colo_lost_heartbeat
-@findex x_colo_lost_heartbeat
-Tell COLO that heartbeat is lost, a failover or takeover is needed.
-ETEXI
SRST
``x_colo_lost_heartbeat``
Tell COLO that heartbeat is lost, a failover or takeover is needed.
@@ -1620,13 +1094,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_client_migrate_info,
},
-STEXI
-@item client_migrate_info @var{protocol} @var{hostname} @var{port} @var{tls-port} @var{cert-subject}
-@findex client_migrate_info
-Set migration information for remote display. This makes the server
-ask the client to automatically reconnect using the new parameters
-once migration finished successfully. Only implemented for SPICE.
-ETEXI
SRST
``client_migrate_info`` *protocol* *hostname* *port* *tls-port* *cert-subject*
Set migration information for remote display. This makes the server
@@ -1651,24 +1118,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_dump_guest_memory,
},
-STEXI
-@item dump-guest-memory [-p] @var{filename} @var{begin} @var{length}
-@item dump-guest-memory [-z|-l|-s|-w] @var{filename}
-@findex dump-guest-memory
-Dump guest memory to @var{protocol}. The file can be processed with crash or
-gdb. Without -z|-l|-s|-w, the dump format is ELF.
- -p: do paging to get guest's memory mapping.
- -z: dump in kdump-compressed format, with zlib compression.
- -l: dump in kdump-compressed format, with lzo compression.
- -s: dump in kdump-compressed format, with snappy compression.
- -w: dump in Windows crashdump format (can be used instead of ELF-dump converting),
- for Windows x64 guests with vmcoreinfo driver only
- filename: dump file name.
- begin: the starting physical address. It's optional, and should be
- specified together with length.
- length: the memory size, in bytes. It's optional, and should be specified
- together with begin.
-ETEXI
SRST
``dump-guest-memory [-p]`` *filename* *begin* *length*
\
@@ -1708,11 +1157,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item dump-skeys @var{filename}
-@findex dump-skeys
-Save guest storage keys to a file.
-ETEXI
SRST
``dump-skeys`` *filename*
Save guest storage keys to a file.
@@ -1728,11 +1172,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item migration_mode @var{mode}
-@findex migration_mode
-Enables or disables migration mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``migration_mode`` *mode*
Enables or disables migration mode.
@@ -1753,11 +1192,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_snapshot_blkdev,
},
-STEXI
-@item snapshot_blkdev
-@findex snapshot_blkdev
-Snapshot device, using snapshot file as target if provided
-ETEXI
SRST
``snapshot_blkdev``
Snapshot device, using snapshot file as target if provided
@@ -1773,11 +1207,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_snapshot_blkdev_internal,
},
-STEXI
-@item snapshot_blkdev_internal
-@findex snapshot_blkdev_internal
-Take an internal snapshot on device if it support
-ETEXI
SRST
``snapshot_blkdev_internal``
Take an internal snapshot on device if it support
@@ -1795,11 +1224,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_snapshot_delete_blkdev_internal,
},
-STEXI
-@item snapshot_delete_blkdev_internal
-@findex snapshot_delete_blkdev_internal
-Delete an internal snapshot on device if it support
-ETEXI
SRST
``snapshot_delete_blkdev_internal``
Delete an internal snapshot on device if it support
@@ -1819,12 +1243,6 @@ ERST
"so that the result does not need a backing file.\n\t\t\t",
.cmd = hmp_drive_mirror,
},
-STEXI
-@item drive_mirror
-@findex drive_mirror
-Start mirroring a block device's writes to a new destination,
-using the specified target.
-ETEXI
SRST
``drive_mirror``
Start mirroring a block device's writes to a new destination,
@@ -1847,11 +1265,6 @@ ERST
"(if the target format supports it).\n\t\t\t",
.cmd = hmp_drive_backup,
},
-STEXI
-@item drive_backup
-@findex drive_backup
-Start a point-in-time copy of a block device to a specificed target.
-ETEXI
SRST
``drive_backup``
Start a point-in-time copy of a block device to a specificed target.
@@ -1869,11 +1282,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_drive_add,
},
-STEXI
-@item drive_add
-@findex drive_add
-Add drive to PCI storage controller.
-ETEXI
SRST
``drive_add``
Add drive to PCI storage controller.
@@ -1897,11 +1305,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_pcie_aer_inject_error,
},
-STEXI
-@item pcie_aer_inject_error
-@findex pcie_aer_inject_error
-Inject PCIe AER error
-ETEXI
SRST
``pcie_aer_inject_error``
Inject PCIe AER error
@@ -1916,11 +1319,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = netdev_add_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item netdev_add
-@findex netdev_add
-Add host network device.
-ETEXI
SRST
``netdev_add``
Add host network device.
@@ -1935,11 +1333,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = netdev_del_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item netdev_del
-@findex netdev_del
-Remove host network device.
-ETEXI
SRST
``netdev_del``
Remove host network device.
@@ -1954,11 +1347,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = object_add_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item object_add
-@findex object_add
-Create QOM object.
-ETEXI
SRST
``object_add``
Create QOM object.
@@ -1973,11 +1361,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = object_del_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item object_del
-@findex object_del
-Destroy QOM object.
-ETEXI
SRST
``object_del``
Destroy QOM object.
@@ -1992,11 +1375,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_hostfwd_add,
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item hostfwd_add
-@findex hostfwd_add
-Redirect TCP or UDP connections from host to guest (requires -net user).
-ETEXI
SRST
``hostfwd_add``
Redirect TCP or UDP connections from host to guest (requires -net user).
@@ -2012,11 +1390,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item hostfwd_remove
-@findex hostfwd_remove
-Remove host-to-guest TCP or UDP redirection.
-ETEXI
SRST
``hostfwd_remove``
Remove host-to-guest TCP or UDP redirection.
@@ -2030,11 +1403,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_balloon,
},
-STEXI
-@item balloon @var{value}
-@findex balloon
-Request VM to change its memory allocation to @var{value} (in MB).
-ETEXI
SRST
``balloon`` *value*
Request VM to change its memory allocation to *value* (in MB).
@@ -2049,11 +1417,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = set_link_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item set_link @var{name} [on|off]
-@findex set_link
-Switch link @var{name} on (i.e. up) or off (i.e. down).
-ETEXI
SRST
``set_link`` *name* ``[on|off]``
Switch link *name* on (i.e. up) or off (i.e. down).
@@ -2068,11 +1431,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = watchdog_action_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item watchdog_action
-@findex watchdog_action
-Change watchdog action.
-ETEXI
SRST
``watchdog_action``
Change watchdog action.
@@ -2086,14 +1444,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_acl_show,
},
-STEXI
-@item acl_show @var{aclname}
-@findex acl_show
-List all the matching rules in the access control list, and the default
-policy. There are currently two named access control lists,
-@var{vnc.x509dname} and @var{vnc.username} matching on the x509 client
-certificate distinguished name, and SASL username respectively.
-ETEXI
SRST
``acl_show`` *aclname*
List all the matching rules in the access control list, and the default
@@ -2110,13 +1460,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_acl_policy,
},
-STEXI
-@item acl_policy @var{aclname} @code{allow|deny}
-@findex acl_policy
-Set the default access control list policy, used in the event that
-none of the explicit rules match. The default policy at startup is
-always @code{deny}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``acl_policy`` *aclname* ``allow|deny``
Set the default access control list policy, used in the event that
@@ -2132,16 +1475,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_acl_add,
},
-STEXI
-@item acl_add @var{aclname} @var{match} @code{allow|deny} [@var{index}]
-@findex acl_add
-Add a match rule to the access control list, allowing or denying access.
-The match will normally be an exact username or x509 distinguished name,
-but can optionally include wildcard globs. eg @code{*@@EXAMPLE.COM} to
-allow all users in the @code{EXAMPLE.COM} kerberos realm. The match will
-normally be appended to the end of the ACL, but can be inserted
-earlier in the list if the optional @var{index} parameter is supplied.
-ETEXI
SRST
``acl_add`` *aclname* *match* ``allow|deny`` [*index*]
Add a match rule to the access control list, allowing or denying access.
@@ -2160,11 +1493,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_acl_remove,
},
-STEXI
-@item acl_remove @var{aclname} @var{match}
-@findex acl_remove
-Remove the specified match rule from the access control list.
-ETEXI
SRST
``acl_remove`` *aclname* *match*
Remove the specified match rule from the access control list.
@@ -2178,12 +1506,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_acl_reset,
},
-STEXI
-@item acl_reset @var{aclname}
-@findex acl_reset
-Remove all matches from the access control list, and set the default
-policy back to @code{deny}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``acl_reset`` *aclname*
Remove all matches from the access control list, and set the default
@@ -2197,14 +1519,6 @@ ERST
.help = "serve block devices on the given host and port",
.cmd = hmp_nbd_server_start,
},
-STEXI
-@item nbd_server_start @var{host}:@var{port}
-@findex nbd_server_start
-Start an NBD server on the given host and/or port. If the @option{-a}
-option is included, all of the virtual machine's block devices that
-have an inserted media on them are automatically exported; in this case,
-the @option{-w} option makes the devices writable too.
-ETEXI
SRST
``nbd_server_start`` *host*:*port*
Start an NBD server on the given host and/or port. If the ``-a``
@@ -2220,14 +1534,6 @@ ERST
.help = "export a block device via NBD",
.cmd = hmp_nbd_server_add,
},
-STEXI
-@item nbd_server_add @var{device} [ @var{name} ]
-@findex nbd_server_add
-Export a block device through QEMU's NBD server, which must be started
-beforehand with @command{nbd_server_start}. The @option{-w} option makes the
-exported device writable too. The export name is controlled by @var{name},
-defaulting to @var{device}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``nbd_server_add`` *device* [ *name* ]
Export a block device through QEMU's NBD server, which must be started
@@ -2243,15 +1549,6 @@ ERST
.help = "remove an export previously exposed via NBD",
.cmd = hmp_nbd_server_remove,
},
-STEXI
-@item nbd_server_remove [-f] @var{name}
-@findex nbd_server_remove
-Stop exporting a block device through QEMU's NBD server, which was
-previously started with @command{nbd_server_add}. The @option{-f}
-option forces the server to drop the export immediately even if
-clients are connected; otherwise the command fails unless there are no
-clients.
-ETEXI
SRST
``nbd_server_remove [-f]`` *name*
Stop exporting a block device through QEMU's NBD server, which was
@@ -2268,11 +1565,6 @@ ERST
.help = "stop serving block devices using the NBD protocol",
.cmd = hmp_nbd_server_stop,
},
-STEXI
-@item nbd_server_stop
-@findex nbd_server_stop
-Stop the QEMU embedded NBD server.
-ETEXI
SRST
``nbd_server_stop``
Stop the QEMU embedded NBD server.
@@ -2290,11 +1582,6 @@ ERST
},
#endif
-STEXI
-@item mce @var{cpu} @var{bank} @var{status} @var{mcgstatus} @var{addr} @var{misc}
-@findex mce (x86)
-Inject an MCE on the given CPU (x86 only).
-ETEXI
SRST
``mce`` *cpu* *bank* *status* *mcgstatus* *addr* *misc*
Inject an MCE on the given CPU (x86 only).
@@ -2308,13 +1595,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_getfd,
},
-STEXI
-@item getfd @var{fdname}
-@findex getfd
-If a file descriptor is passed alongside this command using the SCM_RIGHTS
-mechanism on unix sockets, it is stored using the name @var{fdname} for
-later use by other monitor commands.
-ETEXI
SRST
``getfd`` *fdname*
If a file descriptor is passed alongside this command using the SCM_RIGHTS
@@ -2330,13 +1610,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_closefd,
},
-STEXI
-@item closefd @var{fdname}
-@findex closefd
-Close the file descriptor previously assigned to @var{fdname} using the
-@code{getfd} command. This is only needed if the file descriptor was never
-used by another monitor command.
-ETEXI
SRST
``closefd`` *fdname*
Close the file descriptor previously assigned to *fdname* using the
@@ -2352,13 +1625,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_passwd,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_passwd @var{device} @var{password}
-@findex block_passwd
-Set the encrypted device @var{device} password to @var{password}
-
-This command is now obsolete and will always return an error since 2.10
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_passwd`` *device* *password*
Set the encrypted device *device* password to *password*
@@ -2374,12 +1640,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_block_set_io_throttle,
},
-STEXI
-@item block_set_io_throttle @var{device} @var{bps} @var{bps_rd} @var{bps_wr} @var{iops} @var{iops_rd} @var{iops_wr}
-@findex block_set_io_throttle
-Change I/O throttle limits for a block drive to @var{bps} @var{bps_rd} @var{bps_wr} @var{iops} @var{iops_rd} @var{iops_wr}.
-@var{device} can be a block device name, a qdev ID or a QOM path.
-ETEXI
SRST
``block_set_io_throttle`` *device* *bps* *bps_rd* *bps_wr* *iops* *iops_rd* *iops_wr*
Change I/O throttle limits for a block drive to
@@ -2395,16 +1655,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_set_password,
},
-STEXI
-@item set_password [ vnc | spice ] password [ action-if-connected ]
-@findex set_password
-Change spice/vnc password. Use zero to make the password stay valid
-forever. @var{action-if-connected} specifies what should happen in
-case a connection is established: @var{fail} makes the password change
-fail. @var{disconnect} changes the password and disconnects the
-client. @var{keep} changes the password and keeps the connection up.
-@var{keep} is the default.
-ETEXI
SRST
``set_password [ vnc | spice ] password [ action-if-connected ]``
Change spice/vnc password. Use zero to make the password stay valid
@@ -2423,28 +1673,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_expire_password,
},
-STEXI
-@item expire_password [ vnc | spice ] expire-time
-@findex expire_password
-Specify when a password for spice/vnc becomes
-invalid. @var{expire-time} accepts:
-
-@table @var
-@item now
-Invalidate password instantly.
-
-@item never
-Password stays valid forever.
-
-@item +nsec
-Password stays valid for @var{nsec} seconds starting now.
-
-@item nsec
-Password is invalidated at the given time. @var{nsec} are the seconds
-passed since 1970, i.e. unix epoch.
-
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``expire_password [ vnc | spice ]`` *expire-time*
Specify when a password for spice/vnc becomes
@@ -2471,12 +1699,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = chardev_add_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item chardev-add args
-@findex chardev-add
-chardev-add accepts the same parameters as the -chardev command line switch.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``chardev-add`` *args*
chardev-add accepts the same parameters as the -chardev command line switch.
@@ -2490,13 +1712,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_chardev_change,
},
-STEXI
-@item chardev-change args
-@findex chardev-change
-chardev-change accepts existing chardev @var{id} and then the same arguments
-as the -chardev command line switch (except for "id").
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``chardev-change`` *args*
chardev-change accepts existing chardev *id* and then the same arguments
@@ -2512,12 +1727,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = chardev_remove_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item chardev-remove id
-@findex chardev-remove
-Removes the chardev @var{id}.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``chardev-remove`` *id*
Removes the chardev *id*.
@@ -2532,12 +1741,6 @@ ERST
.command_completion = chardev_remove_completion,
},
-STEXI
-@item chardev-send-break id
-@findex chardev-send-break
-Send a break on the chardev @var{id}.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``chardev-send-break`` *id*
Send a break on the chardev *id*.
@@ -2553,12 +1756,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_qemu_io,
},
-STEXI
-@item qemu-io @var{device} @var{command}
-@findex qemu-io
-Executes a qemu-io command on the given block device.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``qemu-io`` *device* *command*
Executes a qemu-io command on the given block device.
@@ -2572,13 +1769,6 @@ ERST
.cmd = hmp_cpu_add,
},
-STEXI
-@item cpu-add @var{id}
-@findex cpu-add
-Add CPU with id @var{id}. This command is deprecated, please
-+use @code{device_add} instead. For details, refer to
-'docs/cpu-hotplug.rst'.
-ETEXI
SRST
``cpu-add`` *id*
Add CPU with id *id*. This command is deprecated, please
@@ -2595,10 +1785,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item qom-list [@var{path}]
-Print QOM properties of object at location @var{path}
-ETEXI
SRST
``qom-list`` [*path*]
Print QOM properties of object at location *path*
@@ -2613,10 +1799,6 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@item qom-set @var{path} @var{property} @var{value}
-Set QOM property @var{property} of object at location @var{path} to value @var{value}
-ETEXI
SRST
``qom-set`` *path* *property* *value*
Set QOM property *property* of object at location *path* to value *value*
@@ -2632,6 +1814,3 @@ ERST
.flags = "p",
},
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
diff --git a/qemu-options.hx b/qemu-options.hx
index 62b7f3b38a..f9fefd43be 100644
--- a/qemu-options.hx
+++ b/qemu-options.hx
@@ -7,17 +7,9 @@ HXCOMM architectures.
HXCOMM HXCOMM can be used for comments, discarded from both texi and C
DEFHEADING(Standard options:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("help", 0, QEMU_OPTION_h,
"-h or -help display this help and exit\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -h
-@findex -h
-Display help and exit
-ETEXI
SRST
``-h``
Display help and exit
@@ -25,11 +17,6 @@ ERST
DEF("version", 0, QEMU_OPTION_version,
"-version display version information and exit\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -version
-@findex -version
-Display version information and exit
-ETEXI
SRST
``-version``
Display version information and exit
@@ -51,63 +38,6 @@ DEF("machine", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_machine, \
" memory-encryption=@var{} memory encryption object to use (default=none)\n"
" hmat=on|off controls ACPI HMAT support (default=off)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -machine [type=]@var{name}[,prop=@var{value}[,...]]
-@findex -machine
-Select the emulated machine by @var{name}. Use @code{-machine help} to list
-available machines.
-
-For architectures which aim to support live migration compatibility
-across releases, each release will introduce a new versioned machine
-type. For example, the 2.8.0 release introduced machine types
-``pc-i440fx-2.8'' and ``pc-q35-2.8'' for the x86_64/i686 architectures.
-
-To allow live migration of guests from QEMU version 2.8.0, to QEMU
-version 2.9.0, the 2.9.0 version must support the ``pc-i440fx-2.8''
-and ``pc-q35-2.8'' machines too. To allow users live migrating VMs
-to skip multiple intermediate releases when upgrading, new releases
-of QEMU will support machine types from many previous versions.
-
-Supported machine properties are:
-@table @option
-@item accel=@var{accels1}[:@var{accels2}[:...]]
-This is used to enable an accelerator. Depending on the target architecture,
-kvm, xen, hax, hvf, whpx or tcg can be available. By default, tcg is used. If there is
-more than one accelerator specified, the next one is used if the previous one
-fails to initialize.
-@item vmport=on|off|auto
-Enables emulation of VMWare IO port, for vmmouse etc. auto says to select the
-value based on accel. For accel=xen the default is off otherwise the default
-is on.
-@item dump-guest-core=on|off
-Include guest memory in a core dump. The default is on.
-@item mem-merge=on|off
-Enables or disables memory merge support. This feature, when supported by
-the host, de-duplicates identical memory pages among VMs instances
-(enabled by default).
-@item aes-key-wrap=on|off
-Enables or disables AES key wrapping support on s390-ccw hosts. This feature
-controls whether AES wrapping keys will be created to allow
-execution of AES cryptographic functions. The default is on.
-@item dea-key-wrap=on|off
-Enables or disables DEA key wrapping support on s390-ccw hosts. This feature
-controls whether DEA wrapping keys will be created to allow
-execution of DEA cryptographic functions. The default is on.
-@item nvdimm=on|off
-Enables or disables NVDIMM support. The default is off.
-@item enforce-config-section=on|off
-If @option{enforce-config-section} is set to @var{on}, force migration
-code to send configuration section even if the machine-type sets the
-@option{migration.send-configuration} property to @var{off}.
-NOTE: this parameter is deprecated. Please use @option{-global}
-@option{migration.send-configuration}=@var{on|off} instead.
-@item memory-encryption=@var{}
-Memory encryption object to use. The default is none.
-@item hmat=on|off
-Enables or disables ACPI Heterogeneous Memory Attribute Table (HMAT) support.
-The default is off.
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-machine [type=]name[,prop=value[,...]]``
Select the emulated machine by name. Use ``-machine help`` to list
@@ -181,11 +111,6 @@ DEF("M", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_M, "", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
DEF("cpu", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_cpu,
"-cpu cpu select CPU ('-cpu help' for list)\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -cpu @var{model}
-@findex -cpu
-Select CPU model (@code{-cpu help} for list and additional feature selection)
-ETEXI
SRST
``-cpu model``
Select CPU model (``-cpu help`` for list and additional feature
@@ -200,33 +125,6 @@ DEF("accel", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_accel,
" kvm-shadow-mem=size of KVM shadow MMU in bytes\n"
" tb-size=n (TCG translation block cache size)\n"
" thread=single|multi (enable multi-threaded TCG)\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -accel @var{name}[,prop=@var{value}[,...]]
-@findex -accel
-This is used to enable an accelerator. Depending on the target architecture,
-kvm, xen, hax, hvf, whpx or tcg can be available. By default, tcg is used. If there is
-more than one accelerator specified, the next one is used if the previous one
-fails to initialize.
-@table @option
-@item igd-passthru=on|off
-When Xen is in use, this option controls whether Intel integrated graphics
-devices can be passed through to the guest (default=off)
-@item kernel-irqchip=on|off|split
-Controls KVM in-kernel irqchip support. The default is full acceleration of the
-interrupt controllers. On x86, split irqchip reduces the kernel attack
-surface, at a performance cost for non-MSI interrupts. Disabling the in-kernel
-irqchip completely is not recommended except for debugging purposes.
-@item kvm-shadow-mem=size
-Defines the size of the KVM shadow MMU.
-@item tb-size=@var{n}
-Controls the size (in MiB) of the TCG translation block cache.
-@item thread=single|multi
-Controls number of TCG threads. When the TCG is multi-threaded there will be one
-thread per vCPU therefor taking advantage of additional host cores. The default
-is to enable multi-threading where both the back-end and front-ends support it and
-no incompatible TCG features have been enabled (e.g. icount/replay).
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-accel name[,prop=value[,...]]``
This is used to enable an accelerator. Depending on the target
@@ -272,18 +170,6 @@ DEF("smp", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_smp,
" dies= number of CPU dies on one socket (for PC only)\n"
" sockets= number of discrete sockets in the system\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -smp [cpus=]@var{n}[,cores=@var{cores}][,threads=@var{threads}][,dies=dies][,sockets=@var{sockets}][,maxcpus=@var{maxcpus}]
-@findex -smp
-Simulate an SMP system with @var{n} CPUs. On the PC target, up to 255
-CPUs are supported. On Sparc32 target, Linux limits the number of usable CPUs
-to 4.
-For the PC target, the number of @var{cores} per die, the number of @var{threads}
-per cores, the number of @var{dies} per packages and the total number of
-@var{sockets} can be specified. Missing values will be computed.
-If any on the three values is given, the total number of CPUs @var{n} can be omitted.
-@var{maxcpus} specifies the maximum number of hotpluggable CPUs.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-smp [cpus=]n[,cores=cores][,threads=threads][,dies=dies][,sockets=sockets][,maxcpus=maxcpus]``
Simulate an SMP system with n CPUs. On the PC target, up to 255 CPUs
@@ -304,149 +190,6 @@ DEF("numa", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_numa,
"-numa hmat-lb,initiator=node,target=node,hierarchy=memory|first-level|second-level|third-level,data-type=access-latency|read-latency|write-latency[,latency=lat][,bandwidth=bw]\n"
"-numa hmat-cache,node-id=node,size=size,level=level[,associativity=none|direct|complex][,policy=none|write-back|write-through][,line=size]\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -numa node[,mem=@var{size}][,cpus=@var{firstcpu}[-@var{lastcpu}]][,nodeid=@var{node}][,initiator=@var{initiator}]
-@itemx -numa node[,memdev=@var{id}][,cpus=@var{firstcpu}[-@var{lastcpu}]][,nodeid=@var{node}][,initiator=@var{initiator}]
-@itemx -numa dist,src=@var{source},dst=@var{destination},val=@var{distance}
-@itemx -numa cpu,node-id=@var{node}[,socket-id=@var{x}][,core-id=@var{y}][,thread-id=@var{z}]
-@itemx -numa hmat-lb,initiator=@var{node},target=@var{node},hierarchy=@var{hierarchy},data-type=@var{tpye}[,latency=@var{lat}][,bandwidth=@var{bw}]
-@itemx -numa hmat-cache,node-id=@var{node},size=@var{size},level=@var{level}[,associativity=@var{str}][,policy=@var{str}][,line=@var{size}]
-@findex -numa
-Define a NUMA node and assign RAM and VCPUs to it.
-Set the NUMA distance from a source node to a destination node.
-Set the ACPI Heterogeneous Memory Attributes for the given nodes.
-
-Legacy VCPU assignment uses @samp{cpus} option where
-@var{firstcpu} and @var{lastcpu} are CPU indexes. Each
-@samp{cpus} option represent a contiguous range of CPU indexes
-(or a single VCPU if @var{lastcpu} is omitted). A non-contiguous
-set of VCPUs can be represented by providing multiple @samp{cpus}
-options. If @samp{cpus} is omitted on all nodes, VCPUs are automatically
-split between them.
-
-For example, the following option assigns VCPUs 0, 1, 2 and 5 to
-a NUMA node:
-@example
--numa node,cpus=0-2,cpus=5
-@end example
-
-@samp{cpu} option is a new alternative to @samp{cpus} option
-which uses @samp{socket-id|core-id|thread-id} properties to assign
-CPU objects to a @var{node} using topology layout properties of CPU.
-The set of properties is machine specific, and depends on used
-machine type/@samp{smp} options. It could be queried with
-@samp{hotpluggable-cpus} monitor command.
-@samp{node-id} property specifies @var{node} to which CPU object
-will be assigned, it's required for @var{node} to be declared
-with @samp{node} option before it's used with @samp{cpu} option.
-
-For example:
-@example
--M pc \
--smp 1,sockets=2,maxcpus=2 \
--numa node,nodeid=0 -numa node,nodeid=1 \
--numa cpu,node-id=0,socket-id=0 -numa cpu,node-id=1,socket-id=1
-@end example
-
-@samp{mem} assigns a given RAM amount to a node. @samp{memdev}
-assigns RAM from a given memory backend device to a node. If
-@samp{mem} and @samp{memdev} are omitted in all nodes, RAM is
-split equally between them.
-
-@samp{mem} and @samp{memdev} are mutually exclusive. Furthermore,
-if one node uses @samp{memdev}, all of them have to use it.
-
-@samp{initiator} is an additional option that points to an @var{initiator}
-NUMA node that has best performance (the lowest latency or largest bandwidth)
-to this NUMA @var{node}. Note that this option can be set only when
-the machine property 'hmat' is set to 'on'.
-
-Following example creates a machine with 2 NUMA nodes, node 0 has CPU.
-node 1 has only memory, and its initiator is node 0. Note that because
-node 0 has CPU, by default the initiator of node 0 is itself and must be
-itself.
-@example
--machine hmat=on \
--m 2G,slots=2,maxmem=4G \
--object memory-backend-ram,size=1G,id=m0 \
--object memory-backend-ram,size=1G,id=m1 \
--numa node,nodeid=0,memdev=m0 \
--numa node,nodeid=1,memdev=m1,initiator=0 \
--smp 2,sockets=2,maxcpus=2 \
--numa cpu,node-id=0,socket-id=0 \
--numa cpu,node-id=0,socket-id=1
-@end example
-
-@var{source} and @var{destination} are NUMA node IDs.
-@var{distance} is the NUMA distance from @var{source} to @var{destination}.
-The distance from a node to itself is always 10. If any pair of nodes is
-given a distance, then all pairs must be given distances. Although, when
-distances are only given in one direction for each pair of nodes, then
-the distances in the opposite directions are assumed to be the same. If,
-however, an asymmetrical pair of distances is given for even one node
-pair, then all node pairs must be provided distance values for both
-directions, even when they are symmetrical. When a node is unreachable
-from another node, set the pair's distance to 255.
-
-Note that the -@option{numa} option doesn't allocate any of the
-specified resources, it just assigns existing resources to NUMA
-nodes. This means that one still has to use the @option{-m},
-@option{-smp} options to allocate RAM and VCPUs respectively.
-
-Use @samp{hmat-lb} to set System Locality Latency and Bandwidth Information
-between initiator and target NUMA nodes in ACPI Heterogeneous Attribute Memory Table (HMAT).
-Initiator NUMA node can create memory requests, usually it has one or more processors.
-Target NUMA node contains addressable memory.
-
-In @samp{hmat-lb} option, @var{node} are NUMA node IDs. @var{hierarchy} is the memory
-hierarchy of the target NUMA node: if @var{hierarchy} is 'memory', the structure
-represents the memory performance; if @var{hierarchy} is 'first-level|second-level|third-level',
-this structure represents aggregated performance of memory side caches for each domain.
-@var{type} of 'data-type' is type of data represented by this structure instance:
-if 'hierarchy' is 'memory', 'data-type' is 'access|read|write' latency or 'access|read|write'
-bandwidth of the target memory; if 'hierarchy' is 'first-level|second-level|third-level',
-'data-type' is 'access|read|write' hit latency or 'access|read|write' hit bandwidth of the
-target memory side cache.
-
-@var{lat} is latency value in nanoseconds. @var{bw} is bandwidth value,
-the possible value and units are NUM[M|G|T], mean that the bandwidth value are
-NUM byte per second (or MB/s, GB/s or TB/s depending on used suffix).
-Note that if latency or bandwidth value is 0, means the corresponding latency or
-bandwidth information is not provided.
-
-In @samp{hmat-cache} option, @var{node-id} is the NUMA-id of the memory belongs.
-@var{size} is the size of memory side cache in bytes. @var{level} is the cache
-level described in this structure, note that the cache level 0 should not be used
-with @samp{hmat-cache} option. @var{associativity} is the cache associativity,
-the possible value is 'none/direct(direct-mapped)/complex(complex cache indexing)'.
-@var{policy} is the write policy. @var{line} is the cache Line size in bytes.
-
-For example, the following options describe 2 NUMA nodes. Node 0 has 2 cpus and
-a ram, node 1 has only a ram. The processors in node 0 access memory in node
-0 with access-latency 5 nanoseconds, access-bandwidth is 200 MB/s;
-The processors in NUMA node 0 access memory in NUMA node 1 with access-latency 10
-nanoseconds, access-bandwidth is 100 MB/s.
-And for memory side cache information, NUMA node 0 and 1 both have 1 level memory
-cache, size is 10KB, policy is write-back, the cache Line size is 8 bytes:
-@example
--machine hmat=on \
--m 2G \
--object memory-backend-ram,size=1G,id=m0 \
--object memory-backend-ram,size=1G,id=m1 \
--smp 2 \
--numa node,nodeid=0,memdev=m0 \
--numa node,nodeid=1,memdev=m1,initiator=0 \
--numa cpu,node-id=0,socket-id=0 \
--numa cpu,node-id=0,socket-id=1 \
--numa hmat-lb,initiator=0,target=0,hierarchy=memory,data-type=access-latency,latency=5 \
--numa hmat-lb,initiator=0,target=0,hierarchy=memory,data-type=access-bandwidth,bandwidth=200M \
--numa hmat-lb,initiator=0,target=1,hierarchy=memory,data-type=access-latency,latency=10 \
--numa hmat-lb,initiator=0,target=1,hierarchy=memory,data-type=access-bandwidth,bandwidth=100M \
--numa hmat-cache,node-id=0,size=10K,level=1,associativity=direct,policy=write-back,line=8 \
--numa hmat-cache,node-id=1,size=10K,level=1,associativity=direct,policy=write-back,line=8
-@end example
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-numa node[,mem=size][,cpus=firstcpu[-lastcpu]][,nodeid=node][,initiator=initiator]``
\
@@ -607,30 +350,6 @@ ERST
DEF("add-fd", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_add_fd,
"-add-fd fd=fd,set=set[,opaque=opaque]\n"
" Add 'fd' to fd 'set'\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -add-fd fd=@var{fd},set=@var{set}[,opaque=@var{opaque}]
-@findex -add-fd
-
-Add a file descriptor to an fd set. Valid options are:
-
-@table @option
-@item fd=@var{fd}
-This option defines the file descriptor of which a duplicate is added to fd set.
-The file descriptor cannot be stdin, stdout, or stderr.
-@item set=@var{set}
-This option defines the ID of the fd set to add the file descriptor to.
-@item opaque=@var{opaque}
-This option defines a free-form string that can be used to describe @var{fd}.
-@end table
-
-You can open an image using pre-opened file descriptors from an fd set:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} \
- -add-fd fd=3,set=2,opaque="rdwr:/path/to/file" \
- -add-fd fd=4,set=2,opaque="rdonly:/path/to/file" \
- -drive file=/dev/fdset/2,index=0,media=disk
-@end example
-ETEXI
SRST
``-add-fd fd=fd,set=set[,opaque=opaque]``
Add a file descriptor to an fd set. Valid options are:
@@ -663,11 +382,6 @@ DEF("set", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_set,
"-set group.id.arg=value\n"
" set <arg> parameter for item <id> of type <group>\n"
" i.e. -set drive.$id.file=/path/to/image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -set @var{group}.@var{id}.@var{arg}=@var{value}
-@findex -set
-Set parameter @var{arg} for item @var{id} of type @var{group}
-ETEXI
SRST
``-set group.id.arg=value``
Set parameter arg for item id of type group
@@ -678,24 +392,6 @@ DEF("global", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_global,
"-global driver=driver,property=property,value=value\n"
" set a global default for a driver property\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -global @var{driver}.@var{prop}=@var{value}
-@itemx -global driver=@var{driver},property=@var{property},value=@var{value}
-@findex -global
-Set default value of @var{driver}'s property @var{prop} to @var{value}, e.g.:
-
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -global ide-hd.physical_block_size=4096 disk-image.img
-@end example
-
-In particular, you can use this to set driver properties for devices which are
-created automatically by the machine model. To create a device which is not
-created automatically and set properties on it, use -@option{device}.
-
--global @var{driver}.@var{prop}=@var{value} is shorthand for -global
-driver=@var{driver},property=@var{prop},value=@var{value}. The
-longhand syntax works even when @var{driver} contains a dot.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-global driver.prop=value``
\
@@ -724,50 +420,6 @@ DEF("boot", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_boot,
" 'sp_time': the period that splash picture last if menu=on, unit is ms\n"
" 'rb_timeout': the timeout before guest reboot when boot failed, unit is ms\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -boot [order=@var{drives}][,once=@var{drives}][,menu=on|off][,splash=@var{sp_name}][,splash-time=@var{sp_time}][,reboot-timeout=@var{rb_timeout}][,strict=on|off]
-@findex -boot
-Specify boot order @var{drives} as a string of drive letters. Valid
-drive letters depend on the target architecture. The x86 PC uses: a, b
-(floppy 1 and 2), c (first hard disk), d (first CD-ROM), n-p (Etherboot
-from network adapter 1-4), hard disk boot is the default. To apply a
-particular boot order only on the first startup, specify it via
-@option{once}. Note that the @option{order} or @option{once} parameter
-should not be used together with the @option{bootindex} property of
-devices, since the firmware implementations normally do not support both
-at the same time.
-
-Interactive boot menus/prompts can be enabled via @option{menu=on} as far
-as firmware/BIOS supports them. The default is non-interactive boot.
-
-A splash picture could be passed to bios, enabling user to show it as logo,
-when option splash=@var{sp_name} is given and menu=on, If firmware/BIOS
-supports them. Currently Seabios for X86 system support it.
-limitation: The splash file could be a jpeg file or a BMP file in 24 BPP
-format(true color). The resolution should be supported by the SVGA mode, so
-the recommended is 320x240, 640x480, 800x640.
-
-A timeout could be passed to bios, guest will pause for @var{rb_timeout} ms
-when boot failed, then reboot. If @var{rb_timeout} is '-1', guest will not
-reboot, qemu passes '-1' to bios by default. Currently Seabios for X86
-system support it.
-
-Do strict boot via @option{strict=on} as far as firmware/BIOS
-supports it. This only effects when boot priority is changed by
-bootindex options. The default is non-strict boot.
-
-@example
-# try to boot from network first, then from hard disk
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -boot order=nc
-# boot from CD-ROM first, switch back to default order after reboot
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -boot once=d
-# boot with a splash picture for 5 seconds.
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -boot menu=on,splash=/root/boot.bmp,splash-time=5000
-@end example
-
-Note: The legacy format '-boot @var{drives}' is still supported but its
-use is discouraged as it may be removed from future versions.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-boot [order=drives][,once=drives][,menu=on|off][,splash=sp_name][,splash-time=sp_time][,reboot-timeout=rb_timeout][,strict=on|off]``
Specify boot order drives as a string of drive letters. Valid drive
@@ -821,26 +473,6 @@ DEF("m", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_m,
" maxmem: maximum amount of guest memory (default: none)\n"
"NOTE: Some architectures might enforce a specific granularity\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -m [size=]@var{megs}[,slots=n,maxmem=size]
-@findex -m
-Sets guest startup RAM size to @var{megs} megabytes. Default is 128 MiB.
-Optionally, a suffix of ``M'' or ``G'' can be used to signify a value in
-megabytes or gigabytes respectively. Optional pair @var{slots}, @var{maxmem}
-could be used to set amount of hotpluggable memory slots and maximum amount of
-memory. Note that @var{maxmem} must be aligned to the page size.
-
-For example, the following command-line sets the guest startup RAM size to
-1GB, creates 3 slots to hotplug additional memory and sets the maximum
-memory the guest can reach to 4GB:
-
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} -m 1G,slots=3,maxmem=4G
-@end example
-
-If @var{slots} and @var{maxmem} are not specified, memory hotplug won't
-be enabled and the guest startup RAM will never increase.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-m [size=]megs[,slots=n,maxmem=size]``
Sets guest startup RAM size to megs megabytes. Default is 128 MiB.
@@ -863,11 +495,6 @@ ERST
DEF("mem-path", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_mempath,
"-mem-path FILE provide backing storage for guest RAM\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -mem-path @var{path}
-@findex -mem-path
-Allocate guest RAM from a temporarily created file in @var{path}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-mem-path path``
Allocate guest RAM from a temporarily created file in path.
@@ -876,11 +503,6 @@ ERST
DEF("mem-prealloc", 0, QEMU_OPTION_mem_prealloc,
"-mem-prealloc preallocate guest memory (use with -mem-path)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -mem-prealloc
-@findex -mem-prealloc
-Preallocate memory when using -mem-path.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-mem-prealloc``
Preallocate memory when using -mem-path.
@@ -889,24 +511,6 @@ ERST
DEF("k", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_k,
"-k language use keyboard layout (for example 'fr' for French)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -k @var{language}
-@findex -k
-Use keyboard layout @var{language} (for example @code{fr} for
-French). This option is only needed where it is not easy to get raw PC
-keycodes (e.g. on Macs, with some X11 servers or with a VNC or curses
-display). You don't normally need to use it on PC/Linux or PC/Windows
-hosts.
-
-The available layouts are:
-@example
-ar de-ch es fo fr-ca hu ja mk no pt-br sv
-da en-gb et fr fr-ch is lt nl pl ru th
-de en-us fi fr-be hr it lv nl-be pt sl tr
-@end example
-
-The default is @code{en-us}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-k language``
Use keyboard layout language (for example ``fr`` for French). This
@@ -931,12 +535,6 @@ HXCOMM Deprecated by -audiodev
DEF("audio-help", 0, QEMU_OPTION_audio_help,
"-audio-help show -audiodev equivalent of the currently specified audio settings\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -audio-help
-@findex -audio-help
-Will show the -audiodev equivalent of the currently specified
-(deprecated) environment variables.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-audio-help``
Will show the -audiodev equivalent of the currently specified
@@ -997,200 +595,6 @@ DEF("audiodev", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_audiodev,
"-audiodev wav,id=id[,prop[=value][,...]]\n"
" path= path of wav file to record\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -audiodev [driver=]@var{driver},id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-@findex -audiodev
-Adds a new audio backend @var{driver} identified by @var{id}. There are
-global and driver specific properties. Some values can be set
-differently for input and output, they're marked with @code{in|out.}.
-You can set the input's property with @code{in.@var{prop}} and the
-output's property with @code{out.@var{prop}}. For example:
-@example
--audiodev alsa,id=example,in.frequency=44110,out.frequency=8000
--audiodev alsa,id=example,out.channels=1 # leaves in.channels unspecified
-@end example
-
-NOTE: parameter validation is known to be incomplete, in many cases
-specifying an invalid option causes QEMU to print an error message and
-continue emulation without sound.
-
-Valid global options are:
-
-@table @option
-@item id=@var{identifier}
-Identifies the audio backend.
-
-@item timer-period=@var{period}
-Sets the timer @var{period} used by the audio subsystem in microseconds.
-Default is 10000 (10 ms).
-
-@item in|out.mixing-engine=on|off
-Use QEMU's mixing engine to mix all streams inside QEMU and convert
-audio formats when not supported by the backend. When off,
-@var{fixed-settings} must be off too. Note that disabling this option
-means that the selected backend must support multiple streams and the
-audio formats used by the virtual cards, otherwise you'll get no sound.
-It's not recommended to disable this option unless you want to use 5.1
-or 7.1 audio, as mixing engine only supports mono and stereo audio.
-Default is on.
-
-@item in|out.fixed-settings=on|off
-Use fixed settings for host audio. When off, it will change based on
-how the guest opens the sound card. In this case you must not specify
-@var{frequency}, @var{channels} or @var{format}. Default is on.
-
-@item in|out.frequency=@var{frequency}
-Specify the @var{frequency} to use when using @var{fixed-settings}.
-Default is 44100Hz.
-
-@item in|out.channels=@var{channels}
-Specify the number of @var{channels} to use when using
-@var{fixed-settings}. Default is 2 (stereo).
-
-@item in|out.format=@var{format}
-Specify the sample @var{format} to use when using @var{fixed-settings}.
-Valid values are: @code{s8}, @code{s16}, @code{s32}, @code{u8},
-@code{u16}, @code{u32}. Default is @code{s16}.
-
-@item in|out.voices=@var{voices}
-Specify the number of @var{voices} to use. Default is 1.
-
-@item in|out.buffer-length=@var{usecs}
-Sets the size of the buffer in microseconds.
-
-@end table
-
-@item -audiodev none,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a dummy backend that discards all outputs. This backend has no
-backend specific properties.
-
-@item -audiodev alsa,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates backend using the ALSA. This backend is only available on
-Linux.
-
-ALSA specific options are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item in|out.dev=@var{device}
-Specify the ALSA @var{device} to use for input and/or output. Default
-is @code{default}.
-
-@item in|out.period-length=@var{usecs}
-Sets the period length in microseconds.
-
-@item in|out.try-poll=on|off
-Attempt to use poll mode with the device. Default is on.
-
-@item threshold=@var{threshold}
-Threshold (in microseconds) when playback starts. Default is 0.
-
-@end table
-
-@item -audiodev coreaudio,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend using Apple's Core Audio. This backend is only
-available on Mac OS and only supports playback.
-
-Core Audio specific options are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item in|out.buffer-count=@var{count}
-Sets the @var{count} of the buffers.
-
-@end table
-
-@item -audiodev dsound,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend using Microsoft's DirectSound. This backend is only
-available on Windows and only supports playback.
-
-DirectSound specific options are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item latency=@var{usecs}
-Add extra @var{usecs} microseconds latency to playback. Default is
-10000 (10 ms).
-
-@end table
-
-@item -audiodev oss,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend using OSS. This backend is available on most
-Unix-like systems.
-
-OSS specific options are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item in|out.dev=@var{device}
-Specify the file name of the OSS @var{device} to use. Default is
-@code{/dev/dsp}.
-
-@item in|out.buffer-count=@var{count}
-Sets the @var{count} of the buffers.
-
-@item in|out.try-poll=on|of
-Attempt to use poll mode with the device. Default is on.
-
-@item try-mmap=on|off
-Try using memory mapped device access. Default is off.
-
-@item exclusive=on|off
-Open the device in exclusive mode (vmix won't work in this case).
-Default is off.
-
-@item dsp-policy=@var{policy}
-Sets the timing policy (between 0 and 10, where smaller number means
-smaller latency but higher CPU usage). Use -1 to use buffer sizes
-specified by @code{buffer} and @code{buffer-count}. This option is
-ignored if you do not have OSS 4. Default is 5.
-
-@end table
-
-@item -audiodev pa,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend using PulseAudio. This backend is available on most
-systems.
-
-PulseAudio specific options are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item server=@var{server}
-Sets the PulseAudio @var{server} to connect to.
-
-@item in|out.name=@var{sink}
-Use the specified source/sink for recording/playback.
-
-@item in|out.latency=@var{usecs}
-Desired latency in microseconds. The PulseAudio server will try to honor this
-value but actual latencies may be lower or higher.
-
-@end table
-
-@item -audiodev sdl,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend using SDL. This backend is available on most systems,
-but you should use your platform's native backend if possible. This
-backend has no backend specific properties.
-
-@item -audiodev spice,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend that sends audio through SPICE. This backend requires
-@code{-spice} and automatically selected in that case, so usually you
-can ignore this option. This backend has no backend specific
-properties.
-
-@item -audiodev wav,id=@var{id}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-Creates a backend that writes audio to a WAV file.
-
-Backend specific options are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item path=@var{path}
-Write recorded audio into the specified file. Default is
-@code{qemu.wav}.
-
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-audiodev [driver=]driver,id=id[,prop[=value][,...]]``
Adds a new audio backend driver identified by id. There are global
@@ -1364,28 +768,6 @@ DEF("soundhw", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_soundhw,
" and only specified sound cards (comma separated list)\n"
" use '-soundhw help' to get the list of supported cards\n"
" use '-soundhw all' to enable all of them\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -soundhw @var{card1}[,@var{card2},...] or -soundhw all
-@findex -soundhw
-Enable audio and selected sound hardware. Use 'help' to print all
-available sound hardware. For example:
-
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -soundhw sb16,adlib disk.img
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -soundhw es1370 disk.img
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -soundhw ac97 disk.img
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -soundhw hda disk.img
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -soundhw all disk.img
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -soundhw help
-@end example
-
-Note that Linux's i810_audio OSS kernel (for AC97) module might
-require manually specifying clocking.
-
-@example
-modprobe i810_audio clocking=48000
-@end example
-ETEXI
SRST
``-soundhw card1[,card2,...] or -soundhw all``
Enable audio and selected sound hardware. Use 'help' to print all
@@ -1415,83 +797,6 @@ DEF("device", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_device,
" use '-device help' to print all possible drivers\n"
" use '-device driver,help' to print all possible properties\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -device @var{driver}[,@var{prop}[=@var{value}][,...]]
-@findex -device
-Add device @var{driver}. @var{prop}=@var{value} sets driver
-properties. Valid properties depend on the driver. To get help on
-possible drivers and properties, use @code{-device help} and
-@code{-device @var{driver},help}.
-
-Some drivers are:
-@item -device ipmi-bmc-sim,id=@var{id}[,slave_addr=@var{val}][,sdrfile=@var{file}][,furareasize=@var{val}][,furdatafile=@var{file}][,guid=@var{uuid}]
-
-Add an IPMI BMC. This is a simulation of a hardware management
-interface processor that normally sits on a system. It provides
-a watchdog and the ability to reset and power control the system.
-You need to connect this to an IPMI interface to make it useful
-
-The IPMI slave address to use for the BMC. The default is 0x20.
-This address is the BMC's address on the I2C network of management
-controllers. If you don't know what this means, it is safe to ignore
-it.
-
-@table @option
-@item id=@var{id}
-The BMC id for interfaces to use this device.
-@item slave_addr=@var{val}
-Define slave address to use for the BMC. The default is 0x20.
-@item sdrfile=@var{file}
-file containing raw Sensor Data Records (SDR) data. The default is none.
-@item fruareasize=@var{val}
-size of a Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) area. The default is 1024.
-@item frudatafile=@var{file}
-file containing raw Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) inventory data. The default is none.
-@item guid=@var{uuid}
-value for the GUID for the BMC, in standard UUID format. If this is set,
-get "Get GUID" command to the BMC will return it. Otherwise "Get GUID"
-will return an error.
-@end table
-
-@item -device ipmi-bmc-extern,id=@var{id},chardev=@var{id}[,slave_addr=@var{val}]
-
-Add a connection to an external IPMI BMC simulator. Instead of
-locally emulating the BMC like the above item, instead connect
-to an external entity that provides the IPMI services.
-
-A connection is made to an external BMC simulator. If you do this, it
-is strongly recommended that you use the "reconnect=" chardev option
-to reconnect to the simulator if the connection is lost. Note that if
-this is not used carefully, it can be a security issue, as the
-interface has the ability to send resets, NMIs, and power off the VM.
-It's best if QEMU makes a connection to an external simulator running
-on a secure port on localhost, so neither the simulator nor QEMU is
-exposed to any outside network.
-
-See the "lanserv/README.vm" file in the OpenIPMI library for more
-details on the external interface.
-
-@item -device isa-ipmi-kcs,bmc=@var{id}[,ioport=@var{val}][,irq=@var{val}]
-
-Add a KCS IPMI interafce on the ISA bus. This also adds a
-corresponding ACPI and SMBIOS entries, if appropriate.
-
-@table @option
-@item bmc=@var{id}
-The BMC to connect to, one of ipmi-bmc-sim or ipmi-bmc-extern above.
-@item ioport=@var{val}
-Define the I/O address of the interface. The default is 0xca0 for KCS.
-@item irq=@var{val}
-Define the interrupt to use. The default is 5. To disable interrupts,
-set this to 0.
-@end table
-
-@item -device isa-ipmi-bt,bmc=@var{id}[,ioport=@var{val}][,irq=@var{val}]
-
-Like the KCS interface, but defines a BT interface. The default port is
-0xe4 and the default interrupt is 5.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-device driver[,prop[=value][,...]]``
Add device driver. prop=value sets driver properties. Valid
@@ -1579,15 +884,6 @@ DEF("name", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_name,
" When debug-threads is enabled, individual threads are given a separate name\n"
" NOTE: The thread names are for debugging and not a stable API.\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -name @var{name}
-@findex -name
-Sets the @var{name} of the guest.
-This name will be displayed in the SDL window caption.
-The @var{name} will also be used for the VNC server.
-Also optionally set the top visible process name in Linux.
-Naming of individual threads can also be enabled on Linux to aid debugging.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-name name``
Sets the name of the guest. This name will be displayed in the SDL
@@ -1599,36 +895,18 @@ ERST
DEF("uuid", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_uuid,
"-uuid %08x-%04x-%04x-%04x-%012x\n"
" specify machine UUID\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -uuid @var{uuid}
-@findex -uuid
-Set system UUID.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-uuid uuid``
Set system UUID.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(Block device options:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("fda", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_fda,
"-fda/-fdb file use 'file' as floppy disk 0/1 image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
DEF("fdb", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_fdb, "", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -fda @var{file}
-@itemx -fdb @var{file}
-@findex -fda
-@findex -fdb
-Use @var{file} as floppy disk 0/1 image (@pxref{disk_images}).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-fda file``
\
@@ -1643,17 +921,6 @@ DEF("hdb", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_hdb, "", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
DEF("hdc", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_hdc,
"-hdc/-hdd file use 'file' as IDE hard disk 2/3 image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
DEF("hdd", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_hdd, "", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -hda @var{file}
-@itemx -hdb @var{file}
-@itemx -hdc @var{file}
-@itemx -hdd @var{file}
-@findex -hda
-@findex -hdb
-@findex -hdc
-@findex -hdd
-Use @var{file} as hard disk 0, 1, 2 or 3 image (@pxref{disk_images}).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-hda file``
\
@@ -1669,13 +936,6 @@ ERST
DEF("cdrom", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_cdrom,
"-cdrom file use 'file' as IDE cdrom image (cdrom is ide1 master)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -cdrom @var{file}
-@findex -cdrom
-Use @var{file} as CD-ROM image (you cannot use @option{-hdc} and
-@option{-cdrom} at the same time). You can use the host CD-ROM by
-using @file{/dev/cdrom} as filename.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-cdrom file``
Use file as CD-ROM image (you cannot use ``-hdc`` and ``-cdrom`` at
@@ -1690,193 +950,6 @@ DEF("blockdev", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_blockdev,
" [,force-share=on|off][,detect-zeroes=on|off|unmap]\n"
" [,driver specific parameters...]\n"
" configure a block backend\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -blockdev @var{option}[,@var{option}[,@var{option}[,...]]]
-@findex -blockdev
-
-Define a new block driver node. Some of the options apply to all block drivers,
-other options are only accepted for a specific block driver. See below for a
-list of generic options and options for the most common block drivers.
-
-Options that expect a reference to another node (e.g. @code{file}) can be
-given in two ways. Either you specify the node name of an already existing node
-(file=@var{node-name}), or you define a new node inline, adding options
-for the referenced node after a dot (file.filename=@var{path},file.aio=native).
-
-A block driver node created with @option{-blockdev} can be used for a guest
-device by specifying its node name for the @code{drive} property in a
-@option{-device} argument that defines a block device.
-
-@table @option
-@item Valid options for any block driver node:
-
-@table @code
-@item driver
-Specifies the block driver to use for the given node.
-@item node-name
-This defines the name of the block driver node by which it will be referenced
-later. The name must be unique, i.e. it must not match the name of a different
-block driver node, or (if you use @option{-drive} as well) the ID of a drive.
-
-If no node name is specified, it is automatically generated. The generated node
-name is not intended to be predictable and changes between QEMU invocations.
-For the top level, an explicit node name must be specified.
-@item read-only
-Open the node read-only. Guest write attempts will fail.
-
-Note that some block drivers support only read-only access, either generally or
-in certain configurations. In this case, the default value
-@option{read-only=off} does not work and the option must be specified
-explicitly.
-@item auto-read-only
-If @option{auto-read-only=on} is set, QEMU may fall back to read-only usage
-even when @option{read-only=off} is requested, or even switch between modes as
-needed, e.g. depending on whether the image file is writable or whether a
-writing user is attached to the node.
-@item force-share
-Override the image locking system of QEMU by forcing the node to utilize
-weaker shared access for permissions where it would normally request exclusive
-access. When there is the potential for multiple instances to have the same
-file open (whether this invocation of QEMU is the first or the second
-instance), both instances must permit shared access for the second instance to
-succeed at opening the file.
-
-Enabling @option{force-share=on} requires @option{read-only=on}.
-@item cache.direct
-The host page cache can be avoided with @option{cache.direct=on}. This will
-attempt to do disk IO directly to the guest's memory. QEMU may still perform an
-internal copy of the data.
-@item cache.no-flush
-In case you don't care about data integrity over host failures, you can use
-@option{cache.no-flush=on}. This option tells QEMU that it never needs to write
-any data to the disk but can instead keep things in cache. If anything goes
-wrong, like your host losing power, the disk storage getting disconnected
-accidentally, etc. your image will most probably be rendered unusable.
-@item discard=@var{discard}
-@var{discard} is one of "ignore" (or "off") or "unmap" (or "on") and controls
-whether @code{discard} (also known as @code{trim} or @code{unmap}) requests are
-ignored or passed to the filesystem. Some machine types may not support
-discard requests.
-@item detect-zeroes=@var{detect-zeroes}
-@var{detect-zeroes} is "off", "on" or "unmap" and enables the automatic
-conversion of plain zero writes by the OS to driver specific optimized
-zero write commands. You may even choose "unmap" if @var{discard} is set
-to "unmap" to allow a zero write to be converted to an @code{unmap} operation.
-@end table
-
-@item Driver-specific options for @code{file}
-
-This is the protocol-level block driver for accessing regular files.
-
-@table @code
-@item filename
-The path to the image file in the local filesystem
-@item aio
-Specifies the AIO backend (threads/native, default: threads)
-@item locking
-Specifies whether the image file is protected with Linux OFD / POSIX locks. The
-default is to use the Linux Open File Descriptor API if available, otherwise no
-lock is applied. (auto/on/off, default: auto)
-@end table
-Example:
-@example
--blockdev driver=file,node-name=disk,filename=disk.img
-@end example
-
-@item Driver-specific options for @code{raw}
-
-This is the image format block driver for raw images. It is usually
-stacked on top of a protocol level block driver such as @code{file}.
-
-@table @code
-@item file
-Reference to or definition of the data source block driver node
-(e.g. a @code{file} driver node)
-@end table
-Example 1:
-@example
--blockdev driver=file,node-name=disk_file,filename=disk.img
--blockdev driver=raw,node-name=disk,file=disk_file
-@end example
-Example 2:
-@example
--blockdev driver=raw,node-name=disk,file.driver=file,file.filename=disk.img
-@end example
-
-@item Driver-specific options for @code{qcow2}
-
-This is the image format block driver for qcow2 images. It is usually
-stacked on top of a protocol level block driver such as @code{file}.
-
-@table @code
-@item file
-Reference to or definition of the data source block driver node
-(e.g. a @code{file} driver node)
-
-@item backing
-Reference to or definition of the backing file block device (default is taken
-from the image file). It is allowed to pass @code{null} here in order to disable
-the default backing file.
-
-@item lazy-refcounts
-Whether to enable the lazy refcounts feature (on/off; default is taken from the
-image file)
-
-@item cache-size
-The maximum total size of the L2 table and refcount block caches in bytes
-(default: the sum of l2-cache-size and refcount-cache-size)
-
-@item l2-cache-size
-The maximum size of the L2 table cache in bytes
-(default: if cache-size is not specified - 32M on Linux platforms, and 8M on
-non-Linux platforms; otherwise, as large as possible within the cache-size,
-while permitting the requested or the minimal refcount cache size)
-
-@item refcount-cache-size
-The maximum size of the refcount block cache in bytes
-(default: 4 times the cluster size; or if cache-size is specified, the part of
-it which is not used for the L2 cache)
-
-@item cache-clean-interval
-Clean unused entries in the L2 and refcount caches. The interval is in seconds.
-The default value is 600 on supporting platforms, and 0 on other platforms.
-Setting it to 0 disables this feature.
-
-@item pass-discard-request
-Whether discard requests to the qcow2 device should be forwarded to the data
-source (on/off; default: on if discard=unmap is specified, off otherwise)
-
-@item pass-discard-snapshot
-Whether discard requests for the data source should be issued when a snapshot
-operation (e.g. deleting a snapshot) frees clusters in the qcow2 file (on/off;
-default: on)
-
-@item pass-discard-other
-Whether discard requests for the data source should be issued on other
-occasions where a cluster gets freed (on/off; default: off)
-
-@item overlap-check
-Which overlap checks to perform for writes to the image
-(none/constant/cached/all; default: cached). For details or finer
-granularity control refer to the QAPI documentation of @code{blockdev-add}.
-@end table
-
-Example 1:
-@example
--blockdev driver=file,node-name=my_file,filename=/tmp/disk.qcow2
--blockdev driver=qcow2,node-name=hda,file=my_file,overlap-check=none,cache-size=16777216
-@end example
-Example 2:
-@example
--blockdev driver=qcow2,node-name=disk,file.driver=http,file.filename=http://example.com/image.qcow2
-@end example
-
-@item Driver-specific options for other drivers
-Please refer to the QAPI documentation of the @code{blockdev-add} QMP command.
-
-@end table
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-blockdev option[,option[,option[,...]]]``
Define a new block driver node. Some of the options apply to all
@@ -2102,170 +1175,6 @@ DEF("drive", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_drive,
" [[,iops_size=is]]\n"
" [[,group=g]]\n"
" use 'file' as a drive image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -drive @var{option}[,@var{option}[,@var{option}[,...]]]
-@findex -drive
-
-Define a new drive. This includes creating a block driver node (the backend) as
-well as a guest device, and is mostly a shortcut for defining the corresponding
-@option{-blockdev} and @option{-device} options.
-
-@option{-drive} accepts all options that are accepted by @option{-blockdev}. In
-addition, it knows the following options:
-
-@table @option
-@item file=@var{file}
-This option defines which disk image (@pxref{disk_images}) to use with
-this drive. If the filename contains comma, you must double it
-(for instance, "file=my,,file" to use file "my,file").
-
-Special files such as iSCSI devices can be specified using protocol
-specific URLs. See the section for "Device URL Syntax" for more information.
-@item if=@var{interface}
-This option defines on which type on interface the drive is connected.
-Available types are: ide, scsi, sd, mtd, floppy, pflash, virtio, none.
-@item bus=@var{bus},unit=@var{unit}
-These options define where is connected the drive by defining the bus number and
-the unit id.
-@item index=@var{index}
-This option defines where is connected the drive by using an index in the list
-of available connectors of a given interface type.
-@item media=@var{media}
-This option defines the type of the media: disk or cdrom.
-@item snapshot=@var{snapshot}
-@var{snapshot} is "on" or "off" and controls snapshot mode for the given drive
-(see @option{-snapshot}).
-@item cache=@var{cache}
-@var{cache} is "none", "writeback", "unsafe", "directsync" or "writethrough"
-and controls how the host cache is used to access block data. This is a
-shortcut that sets the @option{cache.direct} and @option{cache.no-flush}
-options (as in @option{-blockdev}), and additionally @option{cache.writeback},
-which provides a default for the @option{write-cache} option of block guest
-devices (as in @option{-device}). The modes correspond to the following
-settings:
-
-@c Our texi2pod.pl script doesn't support @multitable, so fall back to using
-@c plain ASCII art (well, UTF-8 art really). This looks okay both in the manpage
-@c and the HTML output.
-@example
-@ │ cache.writeback cache.direct cache.no-flush
-─────────────┼─────────────────────────────────────────────────
-writeback │ on off off
-none │ on on off
-writethrough │ off off off
-directsync │ off on off
-unsafe │ on off on
-@end example
-
-The default mode is @option{cache=writeback}.
-
-@item aio=@var{aio}
-@var{aio} is "threads", or "native" and selects between pthread based disk I/O and native Linux AIO.
-@item format=@var{format}
-Specify which disk @var{format} will be used rather than detecting
-the format. Can be used to specify format=raw to avoid interpreting
-an untrusted format header.
-@item werror=@var{action},rerror=@var{action}
-Specify which @var{action} to take on write and read errors. Valid actions are:
-"ignore" (ignore the error and try to continue), "stop" (pause QEMU),
-"report" (report the error to the guest), "enospc" (pause QEMU only if the
-host disk is full; report the error to the guest otherwise).
-The default setting is @option{werror=enospc} and @option{rerror=report}.
-@item copy-on-read=@var{copy-on-read}
-@var{copy-on-read} is "on" or "off" and enables whether to copy read backing
-file sectors into the image file.
-@item bps=@var{b},bps_rd=@var{r},bps_wr=@var{w}
-Specify bandwidth throttling limits in bytes per second, either for all request
-types or for reads or writes only. Small values can lead to timeouts or hangs
-inside the guest. A safe minimum for disks is 2 MB/s.
-@item bps_max=@var{bm},bps_rd_max=@var{rm},bps_wr_max=@var{wm}
-Specify bursts in bytes per second, either for all request types or for reads
-or writes only. Bursts allow the guest I/O to spike above the limit
-temporarily.
-@item iops=@var{i},iops_rd=@var{r},iops_wr=@var{w}
-Specify request rate limits in requests per second, either for all request
-types or for reads or writes only.
-@item iops_max=@var{bm},iops_rd_max=@var{rm},iops_wr_max=@var{wm}
-Specify bursts in requests per second, either for all request types or for reads
-or writes only. Bursts allow the guest I/O to spike above the limit
-temporarily.
-@item iops_size=@var{is}
-Let every @var{is} bytes of a request count as a new request for iops
-throttling purposes. Use this option to prevent guests from circumventing iops
-limits by sending fewer but larger requests.
-@item group=@var{g}
-Join a throttling quota group with given name @var{g}. All drives that are
-members of the same group are accounted for together. Use this option to
-prevent guests from circumventing throttling limits by using many small disks
-instead of a single larger disk.
-@end table
-
-By default, the @option{cache.writeback=on} mode is used. It will report data
-writes as completed as soon as the data is present in the host page cache.
-This is safe as long as your guest OS makes sure to correctly flush disk caches
-where needed. If your guest OS does not handle volatile disk write caches
-correctly and your host crashes or loses power, then the guest may experience
-data corruption.
-
-For such guests, you should consider using @option{cache.writeback=off}. This
-means that the host page cache will be used to read and write data, but write
-notification will be sent to the guest only after QEMU has made sure to flush
-each write to the disk. Be aware that this has a major impact on performance.
-
-When using the @option{-snapshot} option, unsafe caching is always used.
-
-Copy-on-read avoids accessing the same backing file sectors repeatedly and is
-useful when the backing file is over a slow network. By default copy-on-read
-is off.
-
-Instead of @option{-cdrom} you can use:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} -drive file=file,index=2,media=cdrom
-@end example
-
-Instead of @option{-hda}, @option{-hdb}, @option{-hdc}, @option{-hdd}, you can
-use:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} -drive file=file,index=0,media=disk
-@value{qemu_system} -drive file=file,index=1,media=disk
-@value{qemu_system} -drive file=file,index=2,media=disk
-@value{qemu_system} -drive file=file,index=3,media=disk
-@end example
-
-You can open an image using pre-opened file descriptors from an fd set:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} \
- -add-fd fd=3,set=2,opaque="rdwr:/path/to/file" \
- -add-fd fd=4,set=2,opaque="rdonly:/path/to/file" \
- -drive file=/dev/fdset/2,index=0,media=disk
-@end example
-
-You can connect a CDROM to the slave of ide0:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -drive file=file,if=ide,index=1,media=cdrom
-@end example
-
-If you don't specify the "file=" argument, you define an empty drive:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -drive if=ide,index=1,media=cdrom
-@end example
-
-Instead of @option{-fda}, @option{-fdb}, you can use:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -drive file=file,index=0,if=floppy
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -drive file=file,index=1,if=floppy
-@end example
-
-By default, @var{interface} is "ide" and @var{index} is automatically
-incremented:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -drive file=a -drive file=b"
-@end example
-is interpreted like:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system_x86} -hda a -hdb b
-@end example
-ETEXI
SRST
``-drive option[,option[,option[,...]]]``
Define a new drive. This includes creating a block driver node (the
@@ -2461,11 +1370,6 @@ ERST
DEF("mtdblock", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_mtdblock,
"-mtdblock file use 'file' as on-board Flash memory image\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -mtdblock @var{file}
-@findex -mtdblock
-Use @var{file} as on-board Flash memory image.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-mtdblock file``
Use file as on-board Flash memory image.
@@ -2473,11 +1377,6 @@ ERST
DEF("sd", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_sd,
"-sd file use 'file' as SecureDigital card image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -sd @var{file}
-@findex -sd
-Use @var{file} as SecureDigital card image.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-sd file``
Use file as SecureDigital card image.
@@ -2485,11 +1384,6 @@ ERST
DEF("pflash", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_pflash,
"-pflash file use 'file' as a parallel flash image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -pflash @var{file}
-@findex -pflash
-Use @var{file} as a parallel flash image.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-pflash file``
Use file as a parallel flash image.
@@ -2498,13 +1392,6 @@ ERST
DEF("snapshot", 0, QEMU_OPTION_snapshot,
"-snapshot write to temporary files instead of disk image files\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -snapshot
-@findex -snapshot
-Write to temporary files instead of disk image files. In this case,
-the raw disk image you use is not written back. You can however force
-the write back by pressing @key{C-a s} (@pxref{disk_images}).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-snapshot``
Write to temporary files instead of disk image files. In this case,
@@ -2526,93 +1413,6 @@ DEF("fsdev", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_fsdev,
"-fsdev synth,id=id\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-@item -fsdev local,id=@var{id},path=@var{path},security_model=@var{security_model} [,writeout=@var{writeout}][,readonly][,fmode=@var{fmode}][,dmode=@var{dmode}] [,throttling.@var{option}=@var{value}[,throttling.@var{option}=@var{value}[,...]]]
-@itemx -fsdev proxy,id=@var{id},socket=@var{socket}[,writeout=@var{writeout}][,readonly]
-@itemx -fsdev proxy,id=@var{id},sock_fd=@var{sock_fd}[,writeout=@var{writeout}][,readonly]
-@itemx -fsdev synth,id=@var{id}[,readonly]
-@findex -fsdev
-Define a new file system device. Valid options are:
-@table @option
-@item local
-Accesses to the filesystem are done by QEMU.
-@item proxy
-Accesses to the filesystem are done by virtfs-proxy-helper(1).
-@item synth
-Synthetic filesystem, only used by QTests.
-@item id=@var{id}
-Specifies identifier for this device.
-@item path=@var{path}
-Specifies the export path for the file system device. Files under
-this path will be available to the 9p client on the guest.
-@item security_model=@var{security_model}
-Specifies the security model to be used for this export path.
-Supported security models are "passthrough", "mapped-xattr", "mapped-file" and "none".
-In "passthrough" security model, files are stored using the same
-credentials as they are created on the guest. This requires QEMU
-to run as root. In "mapped-xattr" security model, some of the file
-attributes like uid, gid, mode bits and link target are stored as
-file attributes. For "mapped-file" these attributes are stored in the
-hidden .virtfs_metadata directory. Directories exported by this security model cannot
-interact with other unix tools. "none" security model is same as
-passthrough except the sever won't report failures if it fails to
-set file attributes like ownership. Security model is mandatory
-only for local fsdriver. Other fsdrivers (like proxy) don't take
-security model as a parameter.
-@item writeout=@var{writeout}
-This is an optional argument. The only supported value is "immediate".
-This means that host page cache will be used to read and write data but
-write notification will be sent to the guest only when the data has been
-reported as written by the storage subsystem.
-@item readonly
-Enables exporting 9p share as a readonly mount for guests. By default
-read-write access is given.
-@item socket=@var{socket}
-Enables proxy filesystem driver to use passed socket file for communicating
-with virtfs-proxy-helper(1).
-@item sock_fd=@var{sock_fd}
-Enables proxy filesystem driver to use passed socket descriptor for
-communicating with virtfs-proxy-helper(1). Usually a helper like libvirt
-will create socketpair and pass one of the fds as sock_fd.
-@item fmode=@var{fmode}
-Specifies the default mode for newly created files on the host. Works only
-with security models "mapped-xattr" and "mapped-file".
-@item dmode=@var{dmode}
-Specifies the default mode for newly created directories on the host. Works
-only with security models "mapped-xattr" and "mapped-file".
-@item throttling.bps-total=@var{b},throttling.bps-read=@var{r},throttling.bps-write=@var{w}
-Specify bandwidth throttling limits in bytes per second, either for all request
-types or for reads or writes only.
-@item throttling.bps-total-max=@var{bm},bps-read-max=@var{rm},bps-write-max=@var{wm}
-Specify bursts in bytes per second, either for all request types or for reads
-or writes only. Bursts allow the guest I/O to spike above the limit
-temporarily.
-@item throttling.iops-total=@var{i},throttling.iops-read=@var{r}, throttling.iops-write=@var{w}
-Specify request rate limits in requests per second, either for all request
-types or for reads or writes only.
-@item throttling.iops-total-max=@var{im},throttling.iops-read-max=@var{irm}, throttling.iops-write-max=@var{iwm}
-Specify bursts in requests per second, either for all request types or for reads
-or writes only. Bursts allow the guest I/O to spike above the limit temporarily.
-@item throttling.iops-size=@var{is}
-Let every @var{is} bytes of a request count as a new request for iops
-throttling purposes.
-@end table
-
--fsdev option is used along with -device driver "virtio-9p-...".
-@item -device virtio-9p-@var{type},fsdev=@var{id},mount_tag=@var{mount_tag}
-Options for virtio-9p-... driver are:
-@table @option
-@item @var{type}
-Specifies the variant to be used. Supported values are "pci", "ccw" or "device",
-depending on the machine type.
-@item fsdev=@var{id}
-Specifies the id value specified along with -fsdev option.
-@item mount_tag=@var{mount_tag}
-Specifies the tag name to be used by the guest to mount this export point.
-@end table
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-fsdev local,id=id,path=path,security_model=security_model [,writeout=writeout][,readonly][,fmode=fmode][,dmode=dmode] [,throttling.option=value[,throttling.option=value[,...]]]``
\
@@ -2734,88 +1534,6 @@ DEF("virtfs", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_virtfs,
"-virtfs synth,mount_tag=tag[,id=id][,readonly]\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-@item -virtfs local,path=@var{path},mount_tag=@var{mount_tag} ,security_model=@var{security_model}[,writeout=@var{writeout}][,readonly] [,fmode=@var{fmode}][,dmode=@var{dmode}][,multidevs=@var{multidevs}]
-@itemx -virtfs proxy,socket=@var{socket},mount_tag=@var{mount_tag} [,writeout=@var{writeout}][,readonly]
-@itemx -virtfs proxy,sock_fd=@var{sock_fd},mount_tag=@var{mount_tag} [,writeout=@var{writeout}][,readonly]
-@itemx -virtfs synth,mount_tag=@var{mount_tag}
-@findex -virtfs
-
-Define a new filesystem device and expose it to the guest using a virtio-9p-device. The general form of a Virtual File system pass-through options are:
-@table @option
-@item local
-Accesses to the filesystem are done by QEMU.
-@item proxy
-Accesses to the filesystem are done by virtfs-proxy-helper(1).
-@item synth
-Synthetic filesystem, only used by QTests.
-@item id=@var{id}
-Specifies identifier for the filesystem device
-@item path=@var{path}
-Specifies the export path for the file system device. Files under
-this path will be available to the 9p client on the guest.
-@item security_model=@var{security_model}
-Specifies the security model to be used for this export path.
-Supported security models are "passthrough", "mapped-xattr", "mapped-file" and "none".
-In "passthrough" security model, files are stored using the same
-credentials as they are created on the guest. This requires QEMU
-to run as root. In "mapped-xattr" security model, some of the file
-attributes like uid, gid, mode bits and link target are stored as
-file attributes. For "mapped-file" these attributes are stored in the
-hidden .virtfs_metadata directory. Directories exported by this security model cannot
-interact with other unix tools. "none" security model is same as
-passthrough except the sever won't report failures if it fails to
-set file attributes like ownership. Security model is mandatory only
-for local fsdriver. Other fsdrivers (like proxy) don't take security
-model as a parameter.
-@item writeout=@var{writeout}
-This is an optional argument. The only supported value is "immediate".
-This means that host page cache will be used to read and write data but
-write notification will be sent to the guest only when the data has been
-reported as written by the storage subsystem.
-@item readonly
-Enables exporting 9p share as a readonly mount for guests. By default
-read-write access is given.
-@item socket=@var{socket}
-Enables proxy filesystem driver to use passed socket file for
-communicating with virtfs-proxy-helper(1). Usually a helper like libvirt
-will create socketpair and pass one of the fds as sock_fd.
-@item sock_fd
-Enables proxy filesystem driver to use passed 'sock_fd' as the socket
-descriptor for interfacing with virtfs-proxy-helper(1).
-@item fmode=@var{fmode}
-Specifies the default mode for newly created files on the host. Works only
-with security models "mapped-xattr" and "mapped-file".
-@item dmode=@var{dmode}
-Specifies the default mode for newly created directories on the host. Works
-only with security models "mapped-xattr" and "mapped-file".
-@item mount_tag=@var{mount_tag}
-Specifies the tag name to be used by the guest to mount this export point.
-@item multidevs=@var{multidevs}
-Specifies how to deal with multiple devices being shared with a 9p export.
-Supported behaviours are either "remap", "forbid" or "warn". The latter is
-the default behaviour on which virtfs 9p expects only one device to be
-shared with the same export, and if more than one device is shared and
-accessed via the same 9p export then only a warning message is logged
-(once) by qemu on host side. In order to avoid file ID collisions on guest
-you should either create a separate virtfs export for each device to be
-shared with guests (recommended way) or you might use "remap" instead which
-allows you to share multiple devices with only one export instead, which is
-achieved by remapping the original inode numbers from host to guest in a
-way that would prevent such collisions. Remapping inodes in such use cases
-is required because the original device IDs from host are never passed and
-exposed on guest. Instead all files of an export shared with virtfs always
-share the same device id on guest. So two files with identical inode
-numbers but from actually different devices on host would otherwise cause a
-file ID collision and hence potential misbehaviours on guest. "forbid" on
-the other hand assumes like "warn" that only one device is shared by the
-same export, however it will not only log a warning message but also
-deny access to additional devices on guest. Note though that "forbid" does
-currently not block all possible file access operations (e.g. readdir()
-would still return entries from other devices).
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-virtfs local,path=path,mount_tag=mount_tag ,security_model=security_model[,writeout=writeout][,readonly] [,fmode=fmode][,dmode=dmode][,multidevs=multidevs]``
\
@@ -2931,37 +1649,18 @@ DEF("iscsi", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_iscsi,
" [,timeout=timeout]\n"
" iSCSI session parameters\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -iscsi
-@findex -iscsi
-Configure iSCSI session parameters.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-iscsi``
Configure iSCSI session parameters.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(USB options:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("usb", 0, QEMU_OPTION_usb,
"-usb enable on-board USB host controller (if not enabled by default)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -usb
-@findex -usb
-Enable USB emulation on machine types with an on-board USB host controller (if
-not enabled by default). Note that on-board USB host controllers may not
-support USB 3.0. In this case @option{-device qemu-xhci} can be used instead
-on machines with PCI.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-usb``
Enable USB emulation on machine types with an on-board USB host
@@ -2973,29 +1672,6 @@ ERST
DEF("usbdevice", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_usbdevice,
"-usbdevice name add the host or guest USB device 'name'\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-@item -usbdevice @var{devname}
-@findex -usbdevice
-Add the USB device @var{devname}. Note that this option is deprecated,
-please use @code{-device usb-...} instead. @xref{usb_devices}.
-
-@table @option
-
-@item mouse
-Virtual Mouse. This will override the PS/2 mouse emulation when activated.
-
-@item tablet
-Pointer device that uses absolute coordinates (like a touchscreen). This
-means QEMU is able to report the mouse position without having to grab the
-mouse. Also overrides the PS/2 mouse emulation when activated.
-
-@item braille
-Braille device. This will use BrlAPI to display the braille output on a real
-or fake device.
-
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-usbdevice devname``
Add the USB device devname. Note that this option is deprecated,
@@ -3017,15 +1693,9 @@ SRST
output on a real or fake device.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(Display options:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("display", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_display,
#if defined(CONFIG_SPICE)
@@ -3062,46 +1732,6 @@ DEF("display", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_display,
"\"-display none\"\n"
#endif
, QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -display @var{type}
-@findex -display
-Select type of display to use. This option is a replacement for the
-old style -sdl/-curses/... options. Use @code{-display help} to list
-the available display types. Valid values for @var{type} are
-@table @option
-@item sdl
-Display video output via SDL (usually in a separate graphics
-window; see the SDL documentation for other possibilities).
-@item curses
-Display video output via curses. For graphics device models which
-support a text mode, QEMU can display this output using a
-curses/ncurses interface. Nothing is displayed when the graphics
-device is in graphical mode or if the graphics device does not support
-a text mode. Generally only the VGA device models support text mode.
-The font charset used by the guest can be specified with the
-@code{charset} option, for example @code{charset=CP850} for IBM CP850
-encoding. The default is @code{CP437}.
-@item none
-Do not display video output. The guest will still see an emulated
-graphics card, but its output will not be displayed to the QEMU
-user. This option differs from the -nographic option in that it
-only affects what is done with video output; -nographic also changes
-the destination of the serial and parallel port data.
-@item gtk
-Display video output in a GTK window. This interface provides drop-down
-menus and other UI elements to configure and control the VM during
-runtime.
-@item vnc
-Start a VNC server on display <arg>
-@item egl-headless
-Offload all OpenGL operations to a local DRI device. For any graphical display,
-this display needs to be paired with either VNC or SPICE displays.
-@item spice-app
-Start QEMU as a Spice server and launch the default Spice client
-application. The Spice server will redirect the serial consoles and
-QEMU monitors. (Since 4.0)
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-display type``
Select type of display to use. This option is a replacement for the
@@ -3153,18 +1783,6 @@ ERST
DEF("nographic", 0, QEMU_OPTION_nographic,
"-nographic disable graphical output and redirect serial I/Os to console\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -nographic
-@findex -nographic
-Normally, if QEMU is compiled with graphical window support, it displays
-output such as guest graphics, guest console, and the QEMU monitor in a
-window. With this option, you can totally disable graphical output so
-that QEMU is a simple command line application. The emulated serial port
-is redirected on the console and muxed with the monitor (unless
-redirected elsewhere explicitly). Therefore, you can still use QEMU to
-debug a Linux kernel with a serial console. Use @key{C-a h} for help on
-switching between the console and monitor.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-nographic``
Normally, if QEMU is compiled with graphical window support, it
@@ -3180,15 +1798,6 @@ ERST
DEF("curses", 0, QEMU_OPTION_curses,
"-curses shorthand for -display curses\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -curses
-@findex -curses
-Normally, if QEMU is compiled with graphical window support, it displays
-output such as guest graphics, guest console, and the QEMU monitor in a
-window. With this option, QEMU can display the VGA output when in text
-mode using a curses/ncurses interface. Nothing is displayed in graphical
-mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-curses``
Normally, if QEMU is compiled with graphical window support, it
@@ -3201,12 +1810,6 @@ ERST
DEF("alt-grab", 0, QEMU_OPTION_alt_grab,
"-alt-grab use Ctrl-Alt-Shift to grab mouse (instead of Ctrl-Alt)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -alt-grab
-@findex -alt-grab
-Use Ctrl-Alt-Shift to grab mouse (instead of Ctrl-Alt). Note that this also
-affects the special keys (for fullscreen, monitor-mode switching, etc).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-alt-grab``
Use Ctrl-Alt-Shift to grab mouse (instead of Ctrl-Alt). Note that
@@ -3217,12 +1820,6 @@ ERST
DEF("ctrl-grab", 0, QEMU_OPTION_ctrl_grab,
"-ctrl-grab use Right-Ctrl to grab mouse (instead of Ctrl-Alt)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -ctrl-grab
-@findex -ctrl-grab
-Use Right-Ctrl to grab mouse (instead of Ctrl-Alt). Note that this also
-affects the special keys (for fullscreen, monitor-mode switching, etc).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-ctrl-grab``
Use Right-Ctrl to grab mouse (instead of Ctrl-Alt). Note that this
@@ -3232,11 +1829,6 @@ ERST
DEF("no-quit", 0, QEMU_OPTION_no_quit,
"-no-quit disable SDL window close capability\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -no-quit
-@findex -no-quit
-Disable SDL window close capability.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-quit``
Disable SDL window close capability.
@@ -3244,11 +1836,6 @@ ERST
DEF("sdl", 0, QEMU_OPTION_sdl,
"-sdl shorthand for -display sdl\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -sdl
-@findex -sdl
-Enable SDL.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-sdl``
Enable SDL.
@@ -3273,103 +1860,6 @@ DEF("spice", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_spice,
" enable spice\n"
" at least one of {port, tls-port} is mandatory\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -spice @var{option}[,@var{option}[,...]]
-@findex -spice
-Enable the spice remote desktop protocol. Valid options are
-
-@table @option
-
-@item port=<nr>
-Set the TCP port spice is listening on for plaintext channels.
-
-@item addr=<addr>
-Set the IP address spice is listening on. Default is any address.
-
-@item ipv4
-@itemx ipv6
-@itemx unix
-Force using the specified IP version.
-
-@item password=<secret>
-Set the password you need to authenticate.
-
-@item sasl
-Require that the client use SASL to authenticate with the spice.
-The exact choice of authentication method used is controlled from the
-system / user's SASL configuration file for the 'qemu' service. This
-is typically found in /etc/sasl2/qemu.conf. If running QEMU as an
-unprivileged user, an environment variable SASL_CONF_PATH can be used
-to make it search alternate locations for the service config.
-While some SASL auth methods can also provide data encryption (eg GSSAPI),
-it is recommended that SASL always be combined with the 'tls' and
-'x509' settings to enable use of SSL and server certificates. This
-ensures a data encryption preventing compromise of authentication
-credentials.
-
-@item disable-ticketing
-Allow client connects without authentication.
-
-@item disable-copy-paste
-Disable copy paste between the client and the guest.
-
-@item disable-agent-file-xfer
-Disable spice-vdagent based file-xfer between the client and the guest.
-
-@item tls-port=<nr>
-Set the TCP port spice is listening on for encrypted channels.
-
-@item x509-dir=<dir>
-Set the x509 file directory. Expects same filenames as -vnc $display,x509=$dir
-
-@item x509-key-file=<file>
-@itemx x509-key-password=<file>
-@itemx x509-cert-file=<file>
-@itemx x509-cacert-file=<file>
-@itemx x509-dh-key-file=<file>
-The x509 file names can also be configured individually.
-
-@item tls-ciphers=<list>
-Specify which ciphers to use.
-
-@item tls-channel=[main|display|cursor|inputs|record|playback]
-@itemx plaintext-channel=[main|display|cursor|inputs|record|playback]
-Force specific channel to be used with or without TLS encryption. The
-options can be specified multiple times to configure multiple
-channels. The special name "default" can be used to set the default
-mode. For channels which are not explicitly forced into one mode the
-spice client is allowed to pick tls/plaintext as he pleases.
-
-@item image-compression=[auto_glz|auto_lz|quic|glz|lz|off]
-Configure image compression (lossless).
-Default is auto_glz.
-
-@item jpeg-wan-compression=[auto|never|always]
-@itemx zlib-glz-wan-compression=[auto|never|always]
-Configure wan image compression (lossy for slow links).
-Default is auto.
-
-@item streaming-video=[off|all|filter]
-Configure video stream detection. Default is off.
-
-@item agent-mouse=[on|off]
-Enable/disable passing mouse events via vdagent. Default is on.
-
-@item playback-compression=[on|off]
-Enable/disable audio stream compression (using celt 0.5.1). Default is on.
-
-@item seamless-migration=[on|off]
-Enable/disable spice seamless migration. Default is off.
-
-@item gl=[on|off]
-Enable/disable OpenGL context. Default is off.
-
-@item rendernode=<file>
-DRM render node for OpenGL rendering. If not specified, it will pick
-the first available. (Since 2.9)
-
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-spice option[,option[,...]]``
Enable the spice remote desktop protocol. Valid options are
@@ -3463,11 +1953,6 @@ ERST
DEF("portrait", 0, QEMU_OPTION_portrait,
"-portrait rotate graphical output 90 deg left (only PXA LCD)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -portrait
-@findex -portrait
-Rotate graphical output 90 deg left (only PXA LCD).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-portrait``
Rotate graphical output 90 deg left (only PXA LCD).
@@ -3476,11 +1961,6 @@ ERST
DEF("rotate", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_rotate,
"-rotate <deg> rotate graphical output some deg left (only PXA LCD)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -rotate @var{deg}
-@findex -rotate
-Rotate graphical output some deg left (only PXA LCD).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-rotate deg``
Rotate graphical output some deg left (only PXA LCD).
@@ -3489,43 +1969,6 @@ ERST
DEF("vga", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_vga,
"-vga [std|cirrus|vmware|qxl|xenfb|tcx|cg3|virtio|none]\n"
" select video card type\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -vga @var{type}
-@findex -vga
-Select type of VGA card to emulate. Valid values for @var{type} are
-@table @option
-@item cirrus
-Cirrus Logic GD5446 Video card. All Windows versions starting from
-Windows 95 should recognize and use this graphic card. For optimal
-performances, use 16 bit color depth in the guest and the host OS.
-(This card was the default before QEMU 2.2)
-@item std
-Standard VGA card with Bochs VBE extensions. If your guest OS
-supports the VESA 2.0 VBE extensions (e.g. Windows XP) and if you want
-to use high resolution modes (>= 1280x1024x16) then you should use
-this option. (This card is the default since QEMU 2.2)
-@item vmware
-VMWare SVGA-II compatible adapter. Use it if you have sufficiently
-recent XFree86/XOrg server or Windows guest with a driver for this
-card.
-@item qxl
-QXL paravirtual graphic card. It is VGA compatible (including VESA
-2.0 VBE support). Works best with qxl guest drivers installed though.
-Recommended choice when using the spice protocol.
-@item tcx
-(sun4m only) Sun TCX framebuffer. This is the default framebuffer for
-sun4m machines and offers both 8-bit and 24-bit colour depths at a
-fixed resolution of 1024x768.
-@item cg3
-(sun4m only) Sun cgthree framebuffer. This is a simple 8-bit framebuffer
-for sun4m machines available in both 1024x768 (OpenBIOS) and 1152x900 (OBP)
-resolutions aimed at people wishing to run older Solaris versions.
-@item virtio
-Virtio VGA card.
-@item none
-Disable VGA card.
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-vga type``
Select type of VGA card to emulate. Valid values for type are
@@ -3574,11 +2017,6 @@ ERST
DEF("full-screen", 0, QEMU_OPTION_full_screen,
"-full-screen start in full screen\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -full-screen
-@findex -full-screen
-Start in full screen.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-full-screen``
Start in full screen.
@@ -3587,18 +2025,6 @@ ERST
DEF("g", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_g ,
"-g WxH[xDEPTH] Set the initial graphical resolution and depth\n",
QEMU_ARCH_PPC | QEMU_ARCH_SPARC | QEMU_ARCH_M68K)
-STEXI
-@item -g @var{width}x@var{height}[x@var{depth}]
-@findex -g
-Set the initial graphical resolution and depth (PPC, SPARC only).
-
-For PPC the default is 800x600x32.
-
-For SPARC with the TCX graphics device, the default is 1024x768x8 with the
-option of 1024x768x24. For cgthree, the default is 1024x768x8 with the option
-of 1152x900x8 for people who wish to use OBP.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-g`` *width*\ ``x``\ *height*\ ``[x``\ *depth*\ ``]``
Set the initial graphical resolution and depth (PPC, SPARC only).
@@ -3613,188 +2039,6 @@ ERST
DEF("vnc", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_vnc ,
"-vnc <display> shorthand for -display vnc=<display>\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -vnc @var{display}[,@var{option}[,@var{option}[,...]]]
-@findex -vnc
-Normally, if QEMU is compiled with graphical window support, it displays
-output such as guest graphics, guest console, and the QEMU monitor in a
-window. With this option, you can have QEMU listen on VNC display
-@var{display} and redirect the VGA display over the VNC session. It is
-very useful to enable the usb tablet device when using this option
-(option @option{-device usb-tablet}). When using the VNC display, you
-must use the @option{-k} parameter to set the keyboard layout if you are
-not using en-us. Valid syntax for the @var{display} is
-
-@table @option
-
-@item to=@var{L}
-
-With this option, QEMU will try next available VNC @var{display}s, until the
-number @var{L}, if the origianlly defined "-vnc @var{display}" is not
-available, e.g. port 5900+@var{display} is already used by another
-application. By default, to=0.
-
-@item @var{host}:@var{d}
-
-TCP connections will only be allowed from @var{host} on display @var{d}.
-By convention the TCP port is 5900+@var{d}. Optionally, @var{host} can
-be omitted in which case the server will accept connections from any host.
-
-@item unix:@var{path}
-
-Connections will be allowed over UNIX domain sockets where @var{path} is the
-location of a unix socket to listen for connections on.
-
-@item none
-
-VNC is initialized but not started. The monitor @code{change} command
-can be used to later start the VNC server.
-
-@end table
-
-Following the @var{display} value there may be one or more @var{option} flags
-separated by commas. Valid options are
-
-@table @option
-
-@item reverse
-
-Connect to a listening VNC client via a ``reverse'' connection. The
-client is specified by the @var{display}. For reverse network
-connections (@var{host}:@var{d},@code{reverse}), the @var{d} argument
-is a TCP port number, not a display number.
-
-@item websocket
-
-Opens an additional TCP listening port dedicated to VNC Websocket connections.
-If a bare @var{websocket} option is given, the Websocket port is
-5700+@var{display}. An alternative port can be specified with the
-syntax @code{websocket}=@var{port}.
-
-If @var{host} is specified connections will only be allowed from this host.
-It is possible to control the websocket listen address independently, using
-the syntax @code{websocket}=@var{host}:@var{port}.
-
-If no TLS credentials are provided, the websocket connection runs in
-unencrypted mode. If TLS credentials are provided, the websocket connection
-requires encrypted client connections.
-
-@item password
-
-Require that password based authentication is used for client connections.
-
-The password must be set separately using the @code{set_password} command in
-the @ref{pcsys_monitor}. The syntax to change your password is:
-@code{set_password <protocol> <password>} where <protocol> could be either
-"vnc" or "spice".
-
-If you would like to change <protocol> password expiration, you should use
-@code{expire_password <protocol> <expiration-time>} where expiration time could
-be one of the following options: now, never, +seconds or UNIX time of
-expiration, e.g. +60 to make password expire in 60 seconds, or 1335196800
-to make password expire on "Mon Apr 23 12:00:00 EDT 2012" (UNIX time for this
-date and time).
-
-You can also use keywords "now" or "never" for the expiration time to
-allow <protocol> password to expire immediately or never expire.
-
-@item tls-creds=@var{ID}
-
-Provides the ID of a set of TLS credentials to use to secure the
-VNC server. They will apply to both the normal VNC server socket
-and the websocket socket (if enabled). Setting TLS credentials
-will cause the VNC server socket to enable the VeNCrypt auth
-mechanism. The credentials should have been previously created
-using the @option{-object tls-creds} argument.
-
-@item tls-authz=@var{ID}
-
-Provides the ID of the QAuthZ authorization object against which
-the client's x509 distinguished name will validated. This object is
-only resolved at time of use, so can be deleted and recreated on the
-fly while the VNC server is active. If missing, it will default
-to denying access.
-
-@item sasl
-
-Require that the client use SASL to authenticate with the VNC server.
-The exact choice of authentication method used is controlled from the
-system / user's SASL configuration file for the 'qemu' service. This
-is typically found in /etc/sasl2/qemu.conf. If running QEMU as an
-unprivileged user, an environment variable SASL_CONF_PATH can be used
-to make it search alternate locations for the service config.
-While some SASL auth methods can also provide data encryption (eg GSSAPI),
-it is recommended that SASL always be combined with the 'tls' and
-'x509' settings to enable use of SSL and server certificates. This
-ensures a data encryption preventing compromise of authentication
-credentials. See the @ref{vnc_security} section for details on using
-SASL authentication.
-
-@item sasl-authz=@var{ID}
-
-Provides the ID of the QAuthZ authorization object against which
-the client's SASL username will validated. This object is
-only resolved at time of use, so can be deleted and recreated on the
-fly while the VNC server is active. If missing, it will default
-to denying access.
-
-@item acl
-
-Legacy method for enabling authorization of clients against the
-x509 distinguished name and SASL username. It results in the creation
-of two @code{authz-list} objects with IDs of @code{vnc.username} and
-@code{vnc.x509dname}. The rules for these objects must be configured
-with the HMP ACL commands.
-
-This option is deprecated and should no longer be used. The new
-@option{sasl-authz} and @option{tls-authz} options are a
-replacement.
-
-@item lossy
-
-Enable lossy compression methods (gradient, JPEG, ...). If this
-option is set, VNC client may receive lossy framebuffer updates
-depending on its encoding settings. Enabling this option can save
-a lot of bandwidth at the expense of quality.
-
-@item non-adaptive
-
-Disable adaptive encodings. Adaptive encodings are enabled by default.
-An adaptive encoding will try to detect frequently updated screen regions,
-and send updates in these regions using a lossy encoding (like JPEG).
-This can be really helpful to save bandwidth when playing videos. Disabling
-adaptive encodings restores the original static behavior of encodings
-like Tight.
-
-@item share=[allow-exclusive|force-shared|ignore]
-
-Set display sharing policy. 'allow-exclusive' allows clients to ask
-for exclusive access. As suggested by the rfb spec this is
-implemented by dropping other connections. Connecting multiple
-clients in parallel requires all clients asking for a shared session
-(vncviewer: -shared switch). This is the default. 'force-shared'
-disables exclusive client access. Useful for shared desktop sessions,
-where you don't want someone forgetting specify -shared disconnect
-everybody else. 'ignore' completely ignores the shared flag and
-allows everybody connect unconditionally. Doesn't conform to the rfb
-spec but is traditional QEMU behavior.
-
-@item key-delay-ms
-
-Set keyboard delay, for key down and key up events, in milliseconds.
-Default is 10. Keyboards are low-bandwidth devices, so this slowdown
-can help the device and guest to keep up and not lose events in case
-events are arriving in bulk. Possible causes for the latter are flaky
-network connections, or scripts for automated testing.
-
-@item audiodev=@var{audiodev}
-
-Use the specified @var{audiodev} when the VNC client requests audio
-transmission. When not using an -audiodev argument, this option must
-be omitted, otherwise is must be present and specify a valid audiodev.
-
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-vnc display[,option[,option[,...]]]``
Normally, if QEMU is compiled with graphical window support, it
@@ -3961,26 +2205,13 @@ SRST
valid audiodev.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
ARCHHEADING(, QEMU_ARCH_I386)
ARCHHEADING(i386 target only:, QEMU_ARCH_I386)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("win2k-hack", 0, QEMU_OPTION_win2k_hack,
"-win2k-hack use it when installing Windows 2000 to avoid a disk full bug\n",
QEMU_ARCH_I386)
-STEXI
-@item -win2k-hack
-@findex -win2k-hack
-Use it when installing Windows 2000 to avoid a disk full bug. After
-Windows 2000 is installed, you no longer need this option (this option
-slows down the IDE transfers).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-win2k-hack``
Use it when installing Windows 2000 to avoid a disk full bug. After
@@ -3991,12 +2222,6 @@ ERST
DEF("no-fd-bootchk", 0, QEMU_OPTION_no_fd_bootchk,
"-no-fd-bootchk disable boot signature checking for floppy disks\n",
QEMU_ARCH_I386)
-STEXI
-@item -no-fd-bootchk
-@findex -no-fd-bootchk
-Disable boot signature checking for floppy disks in BIOS. May
-be needed to boot from old floppy disks.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-fd-bootchk``
Disable boot signature checking for floppy disks in BIOS. May be
@@ -4005,13 +2230,6 @@ ERST
DEF("no-acpi", 0, QEMU_OPTION_no_acpi,
"-no-acpi disable ACPI\n", QEMU_ARCH_I386 | QEMU_ARCH_ARM)
-STEXI
-@item -no-acpi
-@findex -no-acpi
-Disable ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) support. Use
-it if your guest OS complains about ACPI problems (PC target machine
-only).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-acpi``
Disable ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) support.
@@ -4021,11 +2239,6 @@ ERST
DEF("no-hpet", 0, QEMU_OPTION_no_hpet,
"-no-hpet disable HPET\n", QEMU_ARCH_I386)
-STEXI
-@item -no-hpet
-@findex -no-hpet
-Disable HPET support.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-hpet``
Disable HPET support.
@@ -4034,20 +2247,6 @@ ERST
DEF("acpitable", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_acpitable,
"-acpitable [sig=str][,rev=n][,oem_id=str][,oem_table_id=str][,oem_rev=n][,asl_compiler_id=str][,asl_compiler_rev=n][,{data|file}=file1[:file2]...]\n"
" ACPI table description\n", QEMU_ARCH_I386)
-STEXI
-@item -acpitable [sig=@var{str}][,rev=@var{n}][,oem_id=@var{str}][,oem_table_id=@var{str}][,oem_rev=@var{n}] [,asl_compiler_id=@var{str}][,asl_compiler_rev=@var{n}][,data=@var{file1}[:@var{file2}]...]
-@findex -acpitable
-Add ACPI table with specified header fields and context from specified files.
-For file=, take whole ACPI table from the specified files, including all
-ACPI headers (possible overridden by other options).
-For data=, only data
-portion of the table is used, all header information is specified in the
-command line.
-If a SLIC table is supplied to QEMU, then the SLIC's oem_id and oem_table_id
-fields will override the same in the RSDT and the FADT (a.k.a. FACP), in order
-to ensure the field matches required by the Microsoft SLIC spec and the ACPI
-spec.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-acpitable [sig=str][,rev=n][,oem_id=str][,oem_table_id=str][,oem_rev=n] [,asl_compiler_id=str][,asl_compiler_rev=n][,data=file1[:file2]...]``
Add ACPI table with specified header fields and context from
@@ -4083,29 +2282,6 @@ DEF("smbios", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_smbios,
" [,asset=str][,part=str][,speed=%d]\n"
" specify SMBIOS type 17 fields\n",
QEMU_ARCH_I386 | QEMU_ARCH_ARM)
-STEXI
-@item -smbios file=@var{binary}
-@findex -smbios
-Load SMBIOS entry from binary file.
-
-@item -smbios type=0[,vendor=@var{str}][,version=@var{str}][,date=@var{str}][,release=@var{%d.%d}][,uefi=on|off]
-Specify SMBIOS type 0 fields
-
-@item -smbios type=1[,manufacturer=@var{str}][,product=@var{str}][,version=@var{str}][,serial=@var{str}][,uuid=@var{uuid}][,sku=@var{str}][,family=@var{str}]
-Specify SMBIOS type 1 fields
-
-@item -smbios type=2[,manufacturer=@var{str}][,product=@var{str}][,version=@var{str}][,serial=@var{str}][,asset=@var{str}][,location=@var{str}]
-Specify SMBIOS type 2 fields
-
-@item -smbios type=3[,manufacturer=@var{str}][,version=@var{str}][,serial=@var{str}][,asset=@var{str}][,sku=@var{str}]
-Specify SMBIOS type 3 fields
-
-@item -smbios type=4[,sock_pfx=@var{str}][,manufacturer=@var{str}][,version=@var{str}][,serial=@var{str}][,asset=@var{str}][,part=@var{str}]
-Specify SMBIOS type 4 fields
-
-@item -smbios type=17[,loc_pfx=@var{str}][,bank=@var{str}][,manufacturer=@var{str}][,serial=@var{str}][,asset=@var{str}][,part=@var{str}][,speed=@var{%d}]
-Specify SMBIOS type 17 fields
-ETEXI
SRST
``-smbios file=binary``
Load SMBIOS entry from binary file.
@@ -4129,15 +2305,9 @@ SRST
Specify SMBIOS type 17 fields
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(Network options:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("netdev", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_netdev,
#ifdef CONFIG_SLIRP
@@ -4284,448 +2454,6 @@ DEF("net", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_net,
"socket][,option][,option][,...]\n"
" old way to initialize a host network interface\n"
" (use the -netdev option if possible instead)\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -nic [tap|bridge|user|l2tpv3|vde|netmap|vhost-user|socket][,...][,mac=macaddr][,model=mn]
-@findex -nic
-This option is a shortcut for configuring both the on-board (default) guest
-NIC hardware and the host network backend in one go. The host backend options
-are the same as with the corresponding @option{-netdev} options below.
-The guest NIC model can be set with @option{model=@var{modelname}}.
-Use @option{model=help} to list the available device types.
-The hardware MAC address can be set with @option{mac=@var{macaddr}}.
-
-The following two example do exactly the same, to show how @option{-nic} can
-be used to shorten the command line length:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} -netdev user,id=n1,ipv6=off -device e1000,netdev=n1,mac=52:54:98:76:54:32
-@value{qemu_system} -nic user,ipv6=off,model=e1000,mac=52:54:98:76:54:32
-@end example
-
-@item -nic none
-Indicate that no network devices should be configured. It is used to override
-the default configuration (default NIC with ``user'' host network backend)
-which is activated if no other networking options are provided.
-
-@item -netdev user,id=@var{id}[,@var{option}][,@var{option}][,...]
-@findex -netdev
-Configure user mode host network backend which requires no administrator
-privilege to run. Valid options are:
-
-@table @option
-@item id=@var{id}
-Assign symbolic name for use in monitor commands.
-
-@item ipv4=on|off and ipv6=on|off
-Specify that either IPv4 or IPv6 must be enabled. If neither is specified
-both protocols are enabled.
-
-@item net=@var{addr}[/@var{mask}]
-Set IP network address the guest will see. Optionally specify the netmask,
-either in the form a.b.c.d or as number of valid top-most bits. Default is
-10.0.2.0/24.
-
-@item host=@var{addr}
-Specify the guest-visible address of the host. Default is the 2nd IP in the
-guest network, i.e. x.x.x.2.
-
-@item ipv6-net=@var{addr}[/@var{int}]
-Set IPv6 network address the guest will see (default is fec0::/64). The
-network prefix is given in the usual hexadecimal IPv6 address
-notation. The prefix size is optional, and is given as the number of
-valid top-most bits (default is 64).
-
-@item ipv6-host=@var{addr}
-Specify the guest-visible IPv6 address of the host. Default is the 2nd IPv6 in
-the guest network, i.e. xxxx::2.
-
-@item restrict=on|off
-If this option is enabled, the guest will be isolated, i.e. it will not be
-able to contact the host and no guest IP packets will be routed over the host
-to the outside. This option does not affect any explicitly set forwarding rules.
-
-@item hostname=@var{name}
-Specifies the client hostname reported by the built-in DHCP server.
-
-@item dhcpstart=@var{addr}
-Specify the first of the 16 IPs the built-in DHCP server can assign. Default
-is the 15th to 31st IP in the guest network, i.e. x.x.x.15 to x.x.x.31.
-
-@item dns=@var{addr}
-Specify the guest-visible address of the virtual nameserver. The address must
-be different from the host address. Default is the 3rd IP in the guest network,
-i.e. x.x.x.3.
-
-@item ipv6-dns=@var{addr}
-Specify the guest-visible address of the IPv6 virtual nameserver. The address
-must be different from the host address. Default is the 3rd IP in the guest
-network, i.e. xxxx::3.
-
-@item dnssearch=@var{domain}
-Provides an entry for the domain-search list sent by the built-in
-DHCP server. More than one domain suffix can be transmitted by specifying
-this option multiple times. If supported, this will cause the guest to
-automatically try to append the given domain suffix(es) in case a domain name
-can not be resolved.
-
-Example:
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} -nic user,dnssearch=mgmt.example.org,dnssearch=example.org
-@end example
-
-@item domainname=@var{domain}
-Specifies the client domain name reported by the built-in DHCP server.
-
-@item tftp=@var{dir}
-When using the user mode network stack, activate a built-in TFTP
-server. The files in @var{dir} will be exposed as the root of a TFTP server.
-The TFTP client on the guest must be configured in binary mode (use the command
-@code{bin} of the Unix TFTP client).
-
-@item tftp-server-name=@var{name}
-In BOOTP reply, broadcast @var{name} as the "TFTP server name" (RFC2132 option
-66). This can be used to advise the guest to load boot files or configurations
-from a different server than the host address.
-
-@item bootfile=@var{file}
-When using the user mode network stack, broadcast @var{file} as the BOOTP
-filename. In conjunction with @option{tftp}, this can be used to network boot
-a guest from a local directory.
-
-Example (using pxelinux):
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} -hda linux.img -boot n -device e1000,netdev=n1 \
- -netdev user,id=n1,tftp=/path/to/tftp/files,bootfile=/pxelinux.0
-@end example
-
-@item smb=@var{dir}[,smbserver=@var{addr}]
-When using the user mode network stack, activate a built-in SMB
-server so that Windows OSes can access to the host files in @file{@var{dir}}
-transparently. The IP address of the SMB server can be set to @var{addr}. By
-default the 4th IP in the guest network is used, i.e. x.x.x.4.
-
-In the guest Windows OS, the line:
-@example
-10.0.2.4 smbserver
-@end example
-must be added in the file @file{C:\WINDOWS\LMHOSTS} (for windows 9x/Me)
-or @file{C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32\DRIVERS\ETC\LMHOSTS} (Windows NT/2000).
-
-Then @file{@var{dir}} can be accessed in @file{\\smbserver\qemu}.
-
-Note that a SAMBA server must be installed on the host OS.
-
-@item hostfwd=[tcp|udp]:[@var{hostaddr}]:@var{hostport}-[@var{guestaddr}]:@var{guestport}
-Redirect incoming TCP or UDP connections to the host port @var{hostport} to
-the guest IP address @var{guestaddr} on guest port @var{guestport}. If
-@var{guestaddr} is not specified, its value is x.x.x.15 (default first address
-given by the built-in DHCP server). By specifying @var{hostaddr}, the rule can
-be bound to a specific host interface. If no connection type is set, TCP is
-used. This option can be given multiple times.
-
-For example, to redirect host X11 connection from screen 1 to guest
-screen 0, use the following:
-
-@example
-# on the host
-@value{qemu_system} -nic user,hostfwd=tcp:127.0.0.1:6001-:6000
-# this host xterm should open in the guest X11 server
-xterm -display :1
-@end example
-
-To redirect telnet connections from host port 5555 to telnet port on
-the guest, use the following:
-
-@example
-# on the host
-@value{qemu_system} -nic user,hostfwd=tcp::5555-:23
-telnet localhost 5555
-@end example
-
-Then when you use on the host @code{telnet localhost 5555}, you
-connect to the guest telnet server.
-
-@item guestfwd=[tcp]:@var{server}:@var{port}-@var{dev}
-@itemx guestfwd=[tcp]:@var{server}:@var{port}-@var{cmd:command}
-Forward guest TCP connections to the IP address @var{server} on port @var{port}
-to the character device @var{dev} or to a program executed by @var{cmd:command}
-which gets spawned for each connection. This option can be given multiple times.
-
-You can either use a chardev directly and have that one used throughout QEMU's
-lifetime, like in the following example:
-
-@example
-# open 10.10.1.1:4321 on bootup, connect 10.0.2.100:1234 to it whenever
-# the guest accesses it
-@value{qemu_system} -nic user,guestfwd=tcp:10.0.2.100:1234-tcp:10.10.1.1:4321
-@end example
-
-Or you can execute a command on every TCP connection established by the guest,
-so that QEMU behaves similar to an inetd process for that virtual server:
-
-@example
-# call "netcat 10.10.1.1 4321" on every TCP connection to 10.0.2.100:1234
-# and connect the TCP stream to its stdin/stdout
-@value{qemu_system} -nic 'user,id=n1,guestfwd=tcp:10.0.2.100:1234-cmd:netcat 10.10.1.1 4321'
-@end example
-
-@end table
-
-@item -netdev tap,id=@var{id}[,fd=@var{h}][,ifname=@var{name}][,script=@var{file}][,downscript=@var{dfile}][,br=@var{bridge}][,helper=@var{helper}]
-Configure a host TAP network backend with ID @var{id}.
-
-Use the network script @var{file} to configure it and the network script
-@var{dfile} to deconfigure it. If @var{name} is not provided, the OS
-automatically provides one. The default network configure script is
-@file{/etc/qemu-ifup} and the default network deconfigure script is
-@file{/etc/qemu-ifdown}. Use @option{script=no} or @option{downscript=no}
-to disable script execution.
-
-If running QEMU as an unprivileged user, use the network helper
-@var{helper} to configure the TAP interface and attach it to the bridge.
-The default network helper executable is @file{/path/to/qemu-bridge-helper}
-and the default bridge device is @file{br0}.
-
-@option{fd}=@var{h} can be used to specify the handle of an already
-opened host TAP interface.
-
-Examples:
-
-@example
-#launch a QEMU instance with the default network script
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img -nic tap
-@end example
-
-@example
-#launch a QEMU instance with two NICs, each one connected
-#to a TAP device
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -netdev tap,id=nd0,ifname=tap0 -device e1000,netdev=nd0 \
- -netdev tap,id=nd1,ifname=tap1 -device rtl8139,netdev=nd1
-@end example
-
-@example
-#launch a QEMU instance with the default network helper to
-#connect a TAP device to bridge br0
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img -device virtio-net-pci,netdev=n1 \
- -netdev tap,id=n1,"helper=/path/to/qemu-bridge-helper"
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev bridge,id=@var{id}[,br=@var{bridge}][,helper=@var{helper}]
-Connect a host TAP network interface to a host bridge device.
-
-Use the network helper @var{helper} to configure the TAP interface and
-attach it to the bridge. The default network helper executable is
-@file{/path/to/qemu-bridge-helper} and the default bridge
-device is @file{br0}.
-
-Examples:
-
-@example
-#launch a QEMU instance with the default network helper to
-#connect a TAP device to bridge br0
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img -netdev bridge,id=n1 -device virtio-net,netdev=n1
-@end example
-
-@example
-#launch a QEMU instance with the default network helper to
-#connect a TAP device to bridge qemubr0
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img -netdev bridge,br=qemubr0,id=n1 -device virtio-net,netdev=n1
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev socket,id=@var{id}[,fd=@var{h}][,listen=[@var{host}]:@var{port}][,connect=@var{host}:@var{port}]
-
-This host network backend can be used to connect the guest's network to
-another QEMU virtual machine using a TCP socket connection. If @option{listen}
-is specified, QEMU waits for incoming connections on @var{port}
-(@var{host} is optional). @option{connect} is used to connect to
-another QEMU instance using the @option{listen} option. @option{fd}=@var{h}
-specifies an already opened TCP socket.
-
-Example:
-@example
-# launch a first QEMU instance
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n1,mac=52:54:00:12:34:56 \
- -netdev socket,id=n1,listen=:1234
-# connect the network of this instance to the network of the first instance
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n2,mac=52:54:00:12:34:57 \
- -netdev socket,id=n2,connect=127.0.0.1:1234
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev socket,id=@var{id}[,fd=@var{h}][,mcast=@var{maddr}:@var{port}[,localaddr=@var{addr}]]
-
-Configure a socket host network backend to share the guest's network traffic
-with another QEMU virtual machines using a UDP multicast socket, effectively
-making a bus for every QEMU with same multicast address @var{maddr} and @var{port}.
-NOTES:
-@enumerate
-@item
-Several QEMU can be running on different hosts and share same bus (assuming
-correct multicast setup for these hosts).
-@item
-mcast support is compatible with User Mode Linux (argument @option{eth@var{N}=mcast}), see
-@url{http://user-mode-linux.sf.net}.
-@item
-Use @option{fd=h} to specify an already opened UDP multicast socket.
-@end enumerate
-
-Example:
-@example
-# launch one QEMU instance
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n1,mac=52:54:00:12:34:56 \
- -netdev socket,id=n1,mcast=230.0.0.1:1234
-# launch another QEMU instance on same "bus"
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n2,mac=52:54:00:12:34:57 \
- -netdev socket,id=n2,mcast=230.0.0.1:1234
-# launch yet another QEMU instance on same "bus"
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n3,mac=52:54:00:12:34:58 \
- -netdev socket,id=n3,mcast=230.0.0.1:1234
-@end example
-
-Example (User Mode Linux compat.):
-@example
-# launch QEMU instance (note mcast address selected is UML's default)
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n1,mac=52:54:00:12:34:56 \
- -netdev socket,id=n1,mcast=239.192.168.1:1102
-# launch UML
-/path/to/linux ubd0=/path/to/root_fs eth0=mcast
-@end example
-
-Example (send packets from host's 1.2.3.4):
-@example
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img \
- -device e1000,netdev=n1,mac=52:54:00:12:34:56 \
- -netdev socket,id=n1,mcast=239.192.168.1:1102,localaddr=1.2.3.4
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev l2tpv3,id=@var{id},src=@var{srcaddr},dst=@var{dstaddr}[,srcport=@var{srcport}][,dstport=@var{dstport}],txsession=@var{txsession}[,rxsession=@var{rxsession}][,ipv6][,udp][,cookie64][,counter][,pincounter][,txcookie=@var{txcookie}][,rxcookie=@var{rxcookie}][,offset=@var{offset}]
-Configure a L2TPv3 pseudowire host network backend. L2TPv3 (RFC3931) is a
-popular protocol to transport Ethernet (and other Layer 2) data frames between
-two systems. It is present in routers, firewalls and the Linux kernel
-(from version 3.3 onwards).
-
-This transport allows a VM to communicate to another VM, router or firewall directly.
-
-@table @option
-@item src=@var{srcaddr}
- source address (mandatory)
-@item dst=@var{dstaddr}
- destination address (mandatory)
-@item udp
- select udp encapsulation (default is ip).
-@item srcport=@var{srcport}
- source udp port.
-@item dstport=@var{dstport}
- destination udp port.
-@item ipv6
- force v6, otherwise defaults to v4.
-@item rxcookie=@var{rxcookie}
-@itemx txcookie=@var{txcookie}
- Cookies are a weak form of security in the l2tpv3 specification.
-Their function is mostly to prevent misconfiguration. By default they are 32
-bit.
-@item cookie64
- Set cookie size to 64 bit instead of the default 32
-@item counter=off
- Force a 'cut-down' L2TPv3 with no counter as in
-draft-mkonstan-l2tpext-keyed-ipv6-tunnel-00
-@item pincounter=on
- Work around broken counter handling in peer. This may also help on
-networks which have packet reorder.
-@item offset=@var{offset}
- Add an extra offset between header and data
-@end table
-
-For example, to attach a VM running on host 4.3.2.1 via L2TPv3 to the bridge br-lan
-on the remote Linux host 1.2.3.4:
-@example
-# Setup tunnel on linux host using raw ip as encapsulation
-# on 1.2.3.4
-ip l2tp add tunnel remote 4.3.2.1 local 1.2.3.4 tunnel_id 1 peer_tunnel_id 1 \
- encap udp udp_sport 16384 udp_dport 16384
-ip l2tp add session tunnel_id 1 name vmtunnel0 session_id \
- 0xFFFFFFFF peer_session_id 0xFFFFFFFF
-ifconfig vmtunnel0 mtu 1500
-ifconfig vmtunnel0 up
-brctl addif br-lan vmtunnel0
-
-
-# on 4.3.2.1
-# launch QEMU instance - if your network has reorder or is very lossy add ,pincounter
-
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img -device e1000,netdev=n1 \
- -netdev l2tpv3,id=n1,src=4.2.3.1,dst=1.2.3.4,udp,srcport=16384,dstport=16384,rxsession=0xffffffff,txsession=0xffffffff,counter
-
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev vde,id=@var{id}[,sock=@var{socketpath}][,port=@var{n}][,group=@var{groupname}][,mode=@var{octalmode}]
-Configure VDE backend to connect to PORT @var{n} of a vde switch running on host and
-listening for incoming connections on @var{socketpath}. Use GROUP @var{groupname}
-and MODE @var{octalmode} to change default ownership and permissions for
-communication port. This option is only available if QEMU has been compiled
-with vde support enabled.
-
-Example:
-@example
-# launch vde switch
-vde_switch -F -sock /tmp/myswitch
-# launch QEMU instance
-@value{qemu_system} linux.img -nic vde,sock=/tmp/myswitch
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev vhost-user,chardev=@var{id}[,vhostforce=on|off][,queues=n]
-
-Establish a vhost-user netdev, backed by a chardev @var{id}. The chardev should
-be a unix domain socket backed one. The vhost-user uses a specifically defined
-protocol to pass vhost ioctl replacement messages to an application on the other
-end of the socket. On non-MSIX guests, the feature can be forced with
-@var{vhostforce}. Use 'queues=@var{n}' to specify the number of queues to
-be created for multiqueue vhost-user.
-
-Example:
-@example
-qemu -m 512 -object memory-backend-file,id=mem,size=512M,mem-path=/hugetlbfs,share=on \
- -numa node,memdev=mem \
- -chardev socket,id=chr0,path=/path/to/socket \
- -netdev type=vhost-user,id=net0,chardev=chr0 \
- -device virtio-net-pci,netdev=net0
-@end example
-
-@item -netdev hubport,id=@var{id},hubid=@var{hubid}[,netdev=@var{nd}]
-
-Create a hub port on the emulated hub with ID @var{hubid}.
-
-The hubport netdev lets you connect a NIC to a QEMU emulated hub instead of a
-single netdev. Alternatively, you can also connect the hubport to another
-netdev with ID @var{nd} by using the @option{netdev=@var{nd}} option.
-
-@item -net nic[,netdev=@var{nd}][,macaddr=@var{mac}][,model=@var{type}] [,name=@var{name}][,addr=@var{addr}][,vectors=@var{v}]
-@findex -net
-Legacy option to configure or create an on-board (or machine default) Network
-Interface Card(NIC) and connect it either to the emulated hub with ID 0 (i.e.
-the default hub), or to the netdev @var{nd}.
-If @var{model} is omitted, then the default NIC model associated with
-the machine type is used. Note that the default NIC model may change in
-future QEMU releases, so it is highly recommended to always specify a model.
-Optionally, the MAC address can be changed to @var{mac}, the device
-address set to @var{addr} (PCI cards only), and a @var{name} can be
-assigned for use in monitor commands.
-Optionally, for PCI cards, you can specify the number @var{v} of MSI-X vectors
-that the card should have; this option currently only affects virtio cards; set
-@var{v} = 0 to disable MSI-X. If no @option{-net} option is specified, a single
-NIC is created. QEMU can emulate several different models of network card.
-Use @code{-net nic,model=help} for a list of available devices for your target.
-
-@item -net user|tap|bridge|socket|l2tpv3|vde[,...][,name=@var{name}]
-Configure a host network backend (with the options corresponding to the same
-@option{-netdev} option) and connect it to the emulated hub 0 (the default
-hub). Use @var{name} to specify the name of the hub port.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-nic [tap|bridge|user|l2tpv3|vde|netmap|vhost-user|socket][,...][,mac=macaddr][,model=mn]``
This option is a shortcut for configuring both the on-board
@@ -5191,9 +2919,6 @@ SRST
(the default hub). Use name to specify the name of the hub port.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(Character device options:)
@@ -5241,298 +2966,6 @@ DEF("chardev", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_chardev,
, QEMU_ARCH_ALL
)
-STEXI
-
-The general form of a character device option is:
-@table @option
-@item -chardev @var{backend},id=@var{id}[,mux=on|off][,@var{options}]
-@findex -chardev
-Backend is one of:
-@option{null},
-@option{socket},
-@option{udp},
-@option{msmouse},
-@option{vc},
-@option{ringbuf},
-@option{file},
-@option{pipe},
-@option{console},
-@option{serial},
-@option{pty},
-@option{stdio},
-@option{braille},
-@option{tty},
-@option{parallel},
-@option{parport},
-@option{spicevmc},
-@option{spiceport}.
-The specific backend will determine the applicable options.
-
-Use @code{-chardev help} to print all available chardev backend types.
-
-All devices must have an id, which can be any string up to 127 characters long.
-It is used to uniquely identify this device in other command line directives.
-
-A character device may be used in multiplexing mode by multiple front-ends.
-Specify @option{mux=on} to enable this mode.
-A multiplexer is a "1:N" device, and here the "1" end is your specified chardev
-backend, and the "N" end is the various parts of QEMU that can talk to a chardev.
-If you create a chardev with @option{id=myid} and @option{mux=on}, QEMU will
-create a multiplexer with your specified ID, and you can then configure multiple
-front ends to use that chardev ID for their input/output. Up to four different
-front ends can be connected to a single multiplexed chardev. (Without
-multiplexing enabled, a chardev can only be used by a single front end.)
-For instance you could use this to allow a single stdio chardev to be used by
-two serial ports and the QEMU monitor:
-
-@example
--chardev stdio,mux=on,id=char0 \
--mon chardev=char0,mode=readline \
--serial chardev:char0 \
--serial chardev:char0
-@end example
-
-You can have more than one multiplexer in a system configuration; for instance
-you could have a TCP port multiplexed between UART 0 and UART 1, and stdio
-multiplexed between the QEMU monitor and a parallel port:
-
-@example
--chardev stdio,mux=on,id=char0 \
--mon chardev=char0,mode=readline \
--parallel chardev:char0 \
--chardev tcp,...,mux=on,id=char1 \
--serial chardev:char1 \
--serial chardev:char1
-@end example
-
-When you're using a multiplexed character device, some escape sequences are
-interpreted in the input. @xref{mux_keys, Keys in the character backend
-multiplexer}.
-
-Note that some other command line options may implicitly create multiplexed
-character backends; for instance @option{-serial mon:stdio} creates a
-multiplexed stdio backend connected to the serial port and the QEMU monitor,
-and @option{-nographic} also multiplexes the console and the monitor to
-stdio.
-
-There is currently no support for multiplexing in the other direction
-(where a single QEMU front end takes input and output from multiple chardevs).
-
-Every backend supports the @option{logfile} option, which supplies the path
-to a file to record all data transmitted via the backend. The @option{logappend}
-option controls whether the log file will be truncated or appended to when
-opened.
-
-@end table
-
-The available backends are:
-
-@table @option
-@item -chardev null,id=@var{id}
-A void device. This device will not emit any data, and will drop any data it
-receives. The null backend does not take any options.
-
-@item -chardev socket,id=@var{id}[,@var{TCP options} or @var{unix options}][,server][,nowait][,telnet][,websocket][,reconnect=@var{seconds}][,tls-creds=@var{id}][,tls-authz=@var{id}]
-
-Create a two-way stream socket, which can be either a TCP or a unix socket. A
-unix socket will be created if @option{path} is specified. Behaviour is
-undefined if TCP options are specified for a unix socket.
-
-@option{server} specifies that the socket shall be a listening socket.
-
-@option{nowait} specifies that QEMU should not block waiting for a client to
-connect to a listening socket.
-
-@option{telnet} specifies that traffic on the socket should interpret telnet
-escape sequences.
-
-@option{websocket} specifies that the socket uses WebSocket protocol for
-communication.
-
-@option{reconnect} sets the timeout for reconnecting on non-server sockets when
-the remote end goes away. qemu will delay this many seconds and then attempt
-to reconnect. Zero disables reconnecting, and is the default.
-
-@option{tls-creds} requests enablement of the TLS protocol for encryption,
-and specifies the id of the TLS credentials to use for the handshake. The
-credentials must be previously created with the @option{-object tls-creds}
-argument.
-
-@option{tls-auth} provides the ID of the QAuthZ authorization object against
-which the client's x509 distinguished name will be validated. This object is
-only resolved at time of use, so can be deleted and recreated on the fly
-while the chardev server is active. If missing, it will default to denying
-access.
-
-TCP and unix socket options are given below:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item TCP options: port=@var{port}[,host=@var{host}][,to=@var{to}][,ipv4][,ipv6][,nodelay]
-
-@option{host} for a listening socket specifies the local address to be bound.
-For a connecting socket species the remote host to connect to. @option{host} is
-optional for listening sockets. If not specified it defaults to @code{0.0.0.0}.
-
-@option{port} for a listening socket specifies the local port to be bound. For a
-connecting socket specifies the port on the remote host to connect to.
-@option{port} can be given as either a port number or a service name.
-@option{port} is required.
-
-@option{to} is only relevant to listening sockets. If it is specified, and
-@option{port} cannot be bound, QEMU will attempt to bind to subsequent ports up
-to and including @option{to} until it succeeds. @option{to} must be specified
-as a port number.
-
-@option{ipv4} and @option{ipv6} specify that either IPv4 or IPv6 must be used.
-If neither is specified the socket may use either protocol.
-
-@option{nodelay} disables the Nagle algorithm.
-
-@item unix options: path=@var{path}
-
-@option{path} specifies the local path of the unix socket. @option{path} is
-required.
-
-@end table
-
-@item -chardev udp,id=@var{id}[,host=@var{host}],port=@var{port}[,localaddr=@var{localaddr}][,localport=@var{localport}][,ipv4][,ipv6]
-
-Sends all traffic from the guest to a remote host over UDP.
-
-@option{host} specifies the remote host to connect to. If not specified it
-defaults to @code{localhost}.
-
-@option{port} specifies the port on the remote host to connect to. @option{port}
-is required.
-
-@option{localaddr} specifies the local address to bind to. If not specified it
-defaults to @code{0.0.0.0}.
-
-@option{localport} specifies the local port to bind to. If not specified any
-available local port will be used.
-
-@option{ipv4} and @option{ipv6} specify that either IPv4 or IPv6 must be used.
-If neither is specified the device may use either protocol.
-
-@item -chardev msmouse,id=@var{id}
-
-Forward QEMU's emulated msmouse events to the guest. @option{msmouse} does not
-take any options.
-
-@item -chardev vc,id=@var{id}[[,width=@var{width}][,height=@var{height}]][[,cols=@var{cols}][,rows=@var{rows}]]
-
-Connect to a QEMU text console. @option{vc} may optionally be given a specific
-size.
-
-@option{width} and @option{height} specify the width and height respectively of
-the console, in pixels.
-
-@option{cols} and @option{rows} specify that the console be sized to fit a text
-console with the given dimensions.
-
-@item -chardev ringbuf,id=@var{id}[,size=@var{size}]
-
-Create a ring buffer with fixed size @option{size}.
-@var{size} must be a power of two and defaults to @code{64K}.
-
-@item -chardev file,id=@var{id},path=@var{path}
-
-Log all traffic received from the guest to a file.
-
-@option{path} specifies the path of the file to be opened. This file will be
-created if it does not already exist, and overwritten if it does. @option{path}
-is required.
-
-@item -chardev pipe,id=@var{id},path=@var{path}
-
-Create a two-way connection to the guest. The behaviour differs slightly between
-Windows hosts and other hosts:
-
-On Windows, a single duplex pipe will be created at
-@file{\\.pipe\@option{path}}.
-
-On other hosts, 2 pipes will be created called @file{@option{path}.in} and
-@file{@option{path}.out}. Data written to @file{@option{path}.in} will be
-received by the guest. Data written by the guest can be read from
-@file{@option{path}.out}. QEMU will not create these fifos, and requires them to
-be present.
-
-@option{path} forms part of the pipe path as described above. @option{path} is
-required.
-
-@item -chardev console,id=@var{id}
-
-Send traffic from the guest to QEMU's standard output. @option{console} does not
-take any options.
-
-@option{console} is only available on Windows hosts.
-
-@item -chardev serial,id=@var{id},path=@option{path}
-
-Send traffic from the guest to a serial device on the host.
-
-On Unix hosts serial will actually accept any tty device,
-not only serial lines.
-
-@option{path} specifies the name of the serial device to open.
-
-@item -chardev pty,id=@var{id}
-
-Create a new pseudo-terminal on the host and connect to it. @option{pty} does
-not take any options.
-
-@option{pty} is not available on Windows hosts.
-
-@item -chardev stdio,id=@var{id}[,signal=on|off]
-Connect to standard input and standard output of the QEMU process.
-
-@option{signal} controls if signals are enabled on the terminal, that includes
-exiting QEMU with the key sequence @key{Control-c}. This option is enabled by
-default, use @option{signal=off} to disable it.
-
-@item -chardev braille,id=@var{id}
-
-Connect to a local BrlAPI server. @option{braille} does not take any options.
-
-@item -chardev tty,id=@var{id},path=@var{path}
-
-@option{tty} is only available on Linux, Sun, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and
-DragonFlyBSD hosts. It is an alias for @option{serial}.
-
-@option{path} specifies the path to the tty. @option{path} is required.
-
-@item -chardev parallel,id=@var{id},path=@var{path}
-@itemx -chardev parport,id=@var{id},path=@var{path}
-
-@option{parallel} is only available on Linux, FreeBSD and DragonFlyBSD hosts.
-
-Connect to a local parallel port.
-
-@option{path} specifies the path to the parallel port device. @option{path} is
-required.
-
-@item -chardev spicevmc,id=@var{id},debug=@var{debug},name=@var{name}
-
-@option{spicevmc} is only available when spice support is built in.
-
-@option{debug} debug level for spicevmc
-
-@option{name} name of spice channel to connect to
-
-Connect to a spice virtual machine channel, such as vdiport.
-
-@item -chardev spiceport,id=@var{id},debug=@var{debug},name=@var{name}
-
-@option{spiceport} is only available when spice support is built in.
-
-@option{debug} debug level for spicevmc
-
-@option{name} name of spice port to connect to
-
-Connect to a spice port, allowing a Spice client to handle the traffic
-identified by a name (preferably a fqdn).
-ETEXI
SRST
The general form of a character device option is:
@@ -5794,9 +3227,6 @@ The available backends are:
traffic identified by a name (preferably a fqdn).
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
#ifdef CONFIG_TPM
@@ -5810,78 +3240,6 @@ DEF("tpmdev", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_tpmdev, \
"-tpmdev emulator,id=id,chardev=dev\n"
" configure the TPM device using chardev backend\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-The general form of a TPM device option is:
-@table @option
-
-@item -tpmdev @var{backend},id=@var{id}[,@var{options}]
-@findex -tpmdev
-
-The specific backend type will determine the applicable options.
-The @code{-tpmdev} option creates the TPM backend and requires a
-@code{-device} option that specifies the TPM frontend interface model.
-
-Use @code{-tpmdev help} to print all available TPM backend types.
-
-@end table
-
-The available backends are:
-
-@table @option
-
-@item -tpmdev passthrough,id=@var{id},path=@var{path},cancel-path=@var{cancel-path}
-
-(Linux-host only) Enable access to the host's TPM using the passthrough
-driver.
-
-@option{path} specifies the path to the host's TPM device, i.e., on
-a Linux host this would be @code{/dev/tpm0}.
-@option{path} is optional and by default @code{/dev/tpm0} is used.
-
-@option{cancel-path} specifies the path to the host TPM device's sysfs
-entry allowing for cancellation of an ongoing TPM command.
-@option{cancel-path} is optional and by default QEMU will search for the
-sysfs entry to use.
-
-Some notes about using the host's TPM with the passthrough driver:
-
-The TPM device accessed by the passthrough driver must not be
-used by any other application on the host.
-
-Since the host's firmware (BIOS/UEFI) has already initialized the TPM,
-the VM's firmware (BIOS/UEFI) will not be able to initialize the
-TPM again and may therefore not show a TPM-specific menu that would
-otherwise allow the user to configure the TPM, e.g., allow the user to
-enable/disable or activate/deactivate the TPM.
-Further, if TPM ownership is released from within a VM then the host's TPM
-will get disabled and deactivated. To enable and activate the
-TPM again afterwards, the host has to be rebooted and the user is
-required to enter the firmware's menu to enable and activate the TPM.
-If the TPM is left disabled and/or deactivated most TPM commands will fail.
-
-To create a passthrough TPM use the following two options:
-@example
--tpmdev passthrough,id=tpm0 -device tpm-tis,tpmdev=tpm0
-@end example
-Note that the @code{-tpmdev} id is @code{tpm0} and is referenced by
-@code{tpmdev=tpm0} in the device option.
-
-@item -tpmdev emulator,id=@var{id},chardev=@var{dev}
-
-(Linux-host only) Enable access to a TPM emulator using Unix domain socket based
-chardev backend.
-
-@option{chardev} specifies the unique ID of a character device backend that provides connection to the software TPM server.
-
-To create a TPM emulator backend device with chardev socket backend:
-@example
-
--chardev socket,id=chrtpm,path=/tmp/swtpm-sock -tpmdev emulator,id=tpm0,chardev=chrtpm -device tpm-tis,tpmdev=tpm0
-
-@end example
-
-ETEXI
SRST
The general form of a TPM device option is:
@@ -5946,22 +3304,11 @@ The available backends are:
-chardev socket,id=chrtpm,path=/tmp/swtpm-sock -tpmdev emulator,id=tpm0,chardev=chrtpm -device tpm-tis,tpmdev=tpm0
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
#endif
DEFHEADING(Linux/Multiboot boot specific:)
-STEXI
-
-When using these options, you can use a given Linux or Multiboot
-kernel without installing it in the disk image. It can be useful
-for easier testing of various kernels.
-
-@table @option
-ETEXI
SRST
When using these options, you can use a given Linux or Multiboot kernel
without installing it in the disk image. It can be useful for easier
@@ -5972,12 +3319,6 @@ ERST
DEF("kernel", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_kernel, \
"-kernel bzImage use 'bzImage' as kernel image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -kernel @var{bzImage}
-@findex -kernel
-Use @var{bzImage} as kernel image. The kernel can be either a Linux kernel
-or in multiboot format.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-kernel bzImage``
Use bzImage as kernel image. The kernel can be either a Linux kernel
@@ -5986,11 +3327,6 @@ ERST
DEF("append", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_append, \
"-append cmdline use 'cmdline' as kernel command line\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -append @var{cmdline}
-@findex -append
-Use @var{cmdline} as kernel command line
-ETEXI
SRST
``-append cmdline``
Use cmdline as kernel command line
@@ -5998,18 +3334,6 @@ ERST
DEF("initrd", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_initrd, \
"-initrd file use 'file' as initial ram disk\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -initrd @var{file}
-@findex -initrd
-Use @var{file} as initial ram disk.
-
-@item -initrd "@var{file1} arg=foo,@var{file2}"
-
-This syntax is only available with multiboot.
-
-Use @var{file1} and @var{file2} as modules and pass arg=foo as parameter to the
-first module.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-initrd file``
Use file as initial ram disk.
@@ -6023,27 +3347,15 @@ ERST
DEF("dtb", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_dtb, \
"-dtb file use 'file' as device tree image\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -dtb @var{file}
-@findex -dtb
-Use @var{file} as a device tree binary (dtb) image and pass it to the kernel
-on boot.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-dtb file``
Use file as a device tree binary (dtb) image and pass it to the
kernel on boot.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(Debug/Expert options:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("fw_cfg", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_fwcfg,
"-fw_cfg [name=]<name>,file=<file>\n"
@@ -6051,29 +3363,6 @@ DEF("fw_cfg", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_fwcfg,
"-fw_cfg [name=]<name>,string=<str>\n"
" add named fw_cfg entry with contents from string\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-@item -fw_cfg [name=]@var{name},file=@var{file}
-@findex -fw_cfg
-Add named fw_cfg entry with contents from file @var{file}.
-
-@item -fw_cfg [name=]@var{name},string=@var{str}
-Add named fw_cfg entry with contents from string @var{str}.
-
-The terminating NUL character of the contents of @var{str} will not be
-included as part of the fw_cfg item data. To insert contents with
-embedded NUL characters, you have to use the @var{file} parameter.
-
-The fw_cfg entries are passed by QEMU through to the guest.
-
-Example:
-@example
- -fw_cfg name=opt/com.mycompany/blob,file=./my_blob.bin
-@end example
-creates an fw_cfg entry named opt/com.mycompany/blob with contents
-from ./my_blob.bin.
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-fw_cfg [name=]name,file=file``
Add named fw\_cfg entry with contents from file file.
@@ -6100,140 +3389,6 @@ ERST
DEF("serial", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_serial, \
"-serial dev redirect the serial port to char device 'dev'\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -serial @var{dev}
-@findex -serial
-Redirect the virtual serial port to host character device
-@var{dev}. The default device is @code{vc} in graphical mode and
-@code{stdio} in non graphical mode.
-
-This option can be used several times to simulate up to 4 serial
-ports.
-
-Use @code{-serial none} to disable all serial ports.
-
-Available character devices are:
-@table @option
-@item vc[:@var{W}x@var{H}]
-Virtual console. Optionally, a width and height can be given in pixel with
-@example
-vc:800x600
-@end example
-It is also possible to specify width or height in characters:
-@example
-vc:80Cx24C
-@end example
-@item pty
-[Linux only] Pseudo TTY (a new PTY is automatically allocated)
-@item none
-No device is allocated.
-@item null
-void device
-@item chardev:@var{id}
-Use a named character device defined with the @code{-chardev} option.
-@item /dev/XXX
-[Linux only] Use host tty, e.g. @file{/dev/ttyS0}. The host serial port
-parameters are set according to the emulated ones.
-@item /dev/parport@var{N}
-[Linux only, parallel port only] Use host parallel port
-@var{N}. Currently SPP and EPP parallel port features can be used.
-@item file:@var{filename}
-Write output to @var{filename}. No character can be read.
-@item stdio
-[Unix only] standard input/output
-@item pipe:@var{filename}
-name pipe @var{filename}
-@item COM@var{n}
-[Windows only] Use host serial port @var{n}
-@item udp:[@var{remote_host}]:@var{remote_port}[@@[@var{src_ip}]:@var{src_port}]
-This implements UDP Net Console.
-When @var{remote_host} or @var{src_ip} are not specified
-they default to @code{0.0.0.0}.
-When not using a specified @var{src_port} a random port is automatically chosen.
-
-If you just want a simple readonly console you can use @code{netcat} or
-@code{nc}, by starting QEMU with: @code{-serial udp::4555} and nc as:
-@code{nc -u -l -p 4555}. Any time QEMU writes something to that port it
-will appear in the netconsole session.
-
-If you plan to send characters back via netconsole or you want to stop
-and start QEMU a lot of times, you should have QEMU use the same
-source port each time by using something like @code{-serial
-udp::4555@@:4556} to QEMU. Another approach is to use a patched
-version of netcat which can listen to a TCP port and send and receive
-characters via udp. If you have a patched version of netcat which
-activates telnet remote echo and single char transfer, then you can
-use the following options to set up a netcat redirector to allow
-telnet on port 5555 to access the QEMU port.
-@table @code
-@item QEMU Options:
--serial udp::4555@@:4556
-@item netcat options:
--u -P 4555 -L 0.0.0.0:4556 -t -p 5555 -I -T
-@item telnet options:
-localhost 5555
-@end table
-
-@item tcp:[@var{host}]:@var{port}[,@var{server}][,nowait][,nodelay][,reconnect=@var{seconds}]
-The TCP Net Console has two modes of operation. It can send the serial
-I/O to a location or wait for a connection from a location. By default
-the TCP Net Console is sent to @var{host} at the @var{port}. If you use
-the @var{server} option QEMU will wait for a client socket application
-to connect to the port before continuing, unless the @code{nowait}
-option was specified. The @code{nodelay} option disables the Nagle buffering
-algorithm. The @code{reconnect} option only applies if @var{noserver} is
-set, if the connection goes down it will attempt to reconnect at the
-given interval. If @var{host} is omitted, 0.0.0.0 is assumed. Only
-one TCP connection at a time is accepted. You can use @code{telnet} to
-connect to the corresponding character device.
-@table @code
-@item Example to send tcp console to 192.168.0.2 port 4444
--serial tcp:192.168.0.2:4444
-@item Example to listen and wait on port 4444 for connection
--serial tcp::4444,server
-@item Example to not wait and listen on ip 192.168.0.100 port 4444
--serial tcp:192.168.0.100:4444,server,nowait
-@end table
-
-@item telnet:@var{host}:@var{port}[,server][,nowait][,nodelay]
-The telnet protocol is used instead of raw tcp sockets. The options
-work the same as if you had specified @code{-serial tcp}. The
-difference is that the port acts like a telnet server or client using
-telnet option negotiation. This will also allow you to send the
-MAGIC_SYSRQ sequence if you use a telnet that supports sending the break
-sequence. Typically in unix telnet you do it with Control-] and then
-type "send break" followed by pressing the enter key.
-
-@item websocket:@var{host}:@var{port},server[,nowait][,nodelay]
-The WebSocket protocol is used instead of raw tcp socket. The port acts as
-a WebSocket server. Client mode is not supported.
-
-@item unix:@var{path}[,server][,nowait][,reconnect=@var{seconds}]
-A unix domain socket is used instead of a tcp socket. The option works the
-same as if you had specified @code{-serial tcp} except the unix domain socket
-@var{path} is used for connections.
-
-@item mon:@var{dev_string}
-This is a special option to allow the monitor to be multiplexed onto
-another serial port. The monitor is accessed with key sequence of
-@key{Control-a} and then pressing @key{c}.
-@var{dev_string} should be any one of the serial devices specified
-above. An example to multiplex the monitor onto a telnet server
-listening on port 4444 would be:
-@table @code
-@item -serial mon:telnet::4444,server,nowait
-@end table
-When the monitor is multiplexed to stdio in this way, Ctrl+C will not terminate
-QEMU any more but will be passed to the guest instead.
-
-@item braille
-Braille device. This will use BrlAPI to display the braille output on a real
-or fake device.
-
-@item msmouse
-Three button serial mouse. Configure the guest to use Microsoft protocol.
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-serial dev``
Redirect the virtual serial port to host character device dev. The
@@ -6393,19 +3548,6 @@ ERST
DEF("parallel", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_parallel, \
"-parallel dev redirect the parallel port to char device 'dev'\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -parallel @var{dev}
-@findex -parallel
-Redirect the virtual parallel port to host device @var{dev} (same
-devices as the serial port). On Linux hosts, @file{/dev/parportN} can
-be used to use hardware devices connected on the corresponding host
-parallel port.
-
-This option can be used several times to simulate up to 3 parallel
-ports.
-
-Use @code{-parallel none} to disable all parallel ports.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-parallel dev``
Redirect the virtual parallel port to host device dev (same devices
@@ -6422,15 +3564,6 @@ ERST
DEF("monitor", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_monitor, \
"-monitor dev redirect the monitor to char device 'dev'\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -monitor @var{dev}
-@findex -monitor
-Redirect the monitor to host device @var{dev} (same devices as the
-serial port).
-The default device is @code{vc} in graphical mode and @code{stdio} in
-non graphical mode.
-Use @code{-monitor none} to disable the default monitor.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-monitor dev``
Redirect the monitor to host device dev (same devices as the serial
@@ -6441,11 +3574,6 @@ ERST
DEF("qmp", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_qmp, \
"-qmp dev like -monitor but opens in 'control' mode\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -qmp @var{dev}
-@findex -qmp
-Like -monitor but opens in 'control' mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-qmp dev``
Like -monitor but opens in 'control' mode.
@@ -6453,11 +3581,6 @@ ERST
DEF("qmp-pretty", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_qmp_pretty, \
"-qmp-pretty dev like -qmp but uses pretty JSON formatting\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -qmp-pretty @var{dev}
-@findex -qmp-pretty
-Like -qmp but uses pretty JSON formatting.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-qmp-pretty dev``
Like -qmp but uses pretty JSON formatting.
@@ -6465,12 +3588,6 @@ ERST
DEF("mon", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_mon, \
"-mon [chardev=]name[,mode=readline|control][,pretty[=on|off]]\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -mon [chardev=]name[,mode=readline|control][,pretty[=on|off]]
-@findex -mon
-Setup monitor on chardev @var{name}. @code{pretty} turns on JSON pretty printing
-easing human reading and debugging.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-mon [chardev=]name[,mode=readline|control][,pretty[=on|off]]``
Setup monitor on chardev name. ``pretty`` turns on JSON pretty
@@ -6480,15 +3597,6 @@ ERST
DEF("debugcon", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_debugcon, \
"-debugcon dev redirect the debug console to char device 'dev'\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -debugcon @var{dev}
-@findex -debugcon
-Redirect the debug console to host device @var{dev} (same devices as the
-serial port). The debug console is an I/O port which is typically port
-0xe9; writing to that I/O port sends output to this device.
-The default device is @code{vc} in graphical mode and @code{stdio} in
-non graphical mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-debugcon dev``
Redirect the debug console to host device dev (same devices as the
@@ -6500,12 +3608,6 @@ ERST
DEF("pidfile", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_pidfile, \
"-pidfile file write PID to 'file'\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -pidfile @var{file}
-@findex -pidfile
-Store the QEMU process PID in @var{file}. It is useful if you launch QEMU
-from a script.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-pidfile file``
Store the QEMU process PID in file. It is useful if you launch QEMU
@@ -6514,11 +3616,6 @@ ERST
DEF("singlestep", 0, QEMU_OPTION_singlestep, \
"-singlestep always run in singlestep mode\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -singlestep
-@findex -singlestep
-Run the emulation in single step mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-singlestep``
Run the emulation in single step mode.
@@ -6527,16 +3624,6 @@ ERST
DEF("preconfig", 0, QEMU_OPTION_preconfig, \
"--preconfig pause QEMU before machine is initialized (experimental)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item --preconfig
-@findex --preconfig
-Pause QEMU for interactive configuration before the machine is created,
-which allows querying and configuring properties that will affect
-machine initialization. Use QMP command 'x-exit-preconfig' to exit
-the preconfig state and move to the next state (i.e. run guest if -S
-isn't used or pause the second time if -S is used). This option is
-experimental.
-ETEXI
SRST
``--preconfig``
Pause QEMU for interactive configuration before the machine is
@@ -6550,11 +3637,6 @@ ERST
DEF("S", 0, QEMU_OPTION_S, \
"-S freeze CPU at startup (use 'c' to start execution)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -S
-@findex -S
-Do not start CPU at startup (you must type 'c' in the monitor).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-S``
Do not start CPU at startup (you must type 'c' in the monitor).
@@ -6565,13 +3647,6 @@ DEF("realtime", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_realtime,
" run qemu with realtime features\n"
" mlock=on|off controls mlock support (default: on)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -realtime mlock=on|off
-@findex -realtime
-Run qemu with realtime features.
-mlocking qemu and guest memory can be enabled via @option{mlock=on}
-(enabled by default).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-realtime mlock=on|off``
Run qemu with realtime features. mlocking qemu and guest memory can
@@ -6584,23 +3659,6 @@ DEF("overcommit", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_overcommit,
" mem-lock=on|off controls memory lock support (default: off)\n"
" cpu-pm=on|off controls cpu power management (default: off)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -overcommit mem-lock=on|off
-@item -overcommit cpu-pm=on|off
-@findex -overcommit
-Run qemu with hints about host resource overcommit. The default is
-to assume that host overcommits all resources.
-
-Locking qemu and guest memory can be enabled via @option{mem-lock=on} (disabled
-by default). This works when host memory is not overcommitted and reduces the
-worst-case latency for guest. This is equivalent to @option{realtime}.
-
-Guest ability to manage power state of host cpus (increasing latency for other
-processes on the same host cpu, but decreasing latency for guest) can be
-enabled via @option{cpu-pm=on} (disabled by default). This works best when
-host CPU is not overcommitted. When used, host estimates of CPU cycle and power
-utilization will be incorrect, not taking into account guest idle time.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-overcommit mem-lock=on|off``
\
@@ -6623,17 +3681,6 @@ ERST
DEF("gdb", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_gdb, \
"-gdb dev wait for gdb connection on 'dev'\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -gdb @var{dev}
-@findex -gdb
-Wait for gdb connection on device @var{dev} (@pxref{gdb_usage}). Typical
-connections will likely be TCP-based, but also UDP, pseudo TTY, or even
-stdio are reasonable use case. The latter is allowing to start QEMU from
-within gdb and establish the connection via a pipe:
-@example
-(gdb) target remote | exec @value{qemu_system} -gdb stdio ...
-@end example
-ETEXI
SRST
``-gdb dev``
Wait for gdb connection on device dev (see
@@ -6650,12 +3697,6 @@ ERST
DEF("s", 0, QEMU_OPTION_s, \
"-s shorthand for -gdb tcp::" DEFAULT_GDBSTUB_PORT "\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -s
-@findex -s
-Shorthand for -gdb tcp::1234, i.e. open a gdbserver on TCP port 1234
-(@pxref{gdb_usage}).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-s``
Shorthand for -gdb tcp::1234, i.e. open a gdbserver on TCP port 1234
@@ -6665,11 +3706,6 @@ ERST
DEF("d", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_d, \
"-d item1,... enable logging of specified items (use '-d help' for a list of log items)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -d @var{item1}[,...]
-@findex -d
-Enable logging of specified items. Use '-d help' for a list of log items.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-d item1[,...]``
Enable logging of specified items. Use '-d help' for a list of log
@@ -6679,11 +3715,6 @@ ERST
DEF("D", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_D, \
"-D logfile output log to logfile (default stderr)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -D @var{logfile}
-@findex -D
-Output log in @var{logfile} instead of to stderr
-ETEXI
SRST
``-D logfile``
Output log in logfile instead of to stderr
@@ -6692,20 +3723,6 @@ ERST
DEF("dfilter", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_DFILTER, \
"-dfilter range,.. filter debug output to range of addresses (useful for -d cpu,exec,etc..)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -dfilter @var{range1}[,...]
-@findex -dfilter
-Filter debug output to that relevant to a range of target addresses. The filter
-spec can be either @var{start}+@var{size}, @var{start}-@var{size} or
-@var{start}..@var{end} where @var{start} @var{end} and @var{size} are the
-addresses and sizes required. For example:
-@example
- -dfilter 0x8000..0x8fff,0xffffffc000080000+0x200,0xffffffc000060000-0x1000
-@end example
-Will dump output for any code in the 0x1000 sized block starting at 0x8000 and
-the 0x200 sized block starting at 0xffffffc000080000 and another 0x1000 sized
-block starting at 0xffffffc00005f000.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-dfilter range1[,...]``
Filter debug output to that relevant to a range of target addresses.
@@ -6725,12 +3742,6 @@ ERST
DEF("seed", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_seed, \
"-seed number seed the pseudo-random number generator\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -seed @var{number}
-@findex -seed
-Force the guest to use a deterministic pseudo-random number generator, seeded
-with @var{number}. This does not affect crypto routines within the host.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-seed number``
Force the guest to use a deterministic pseudo-random number
@@ -6741,13 +3752,6 @@ ERST
DEF("L", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_L, \
"-L path set the directory for the BIOS, VGA BIOS and keymaps\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -L @var{path}
-@findex -L
-Set the directory for the BIOS, VGA BIOS and keymaps.
-
-To list all the data directories, use @code{-L help}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-L path``
Set the directory for the BIOS, VGA BIOS and keymaps.
@@ -6757,11 +3761,6 @@ ERST
DEF("bios", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_bios, \
"-bios file set the filename for the BIOS\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -bios @var{file}
-@findex -bios
-Set the filename for the BIOS.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-bios file``
Set the filename for the BIOS.
@@ -6769,12 +3768,6 @@ ERST
DEF("enable-kvm", 0, QEMU_OPTION_enable_kvm, \
"-enable-kvm enable KVM full virtualization support\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -enable-kvm
-@findex -enable-kvm
-Enable KVM full virtualization support. This option is only available
-if KVM support is enabled when compiling.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-enable-kvm``
Enable KVM full virtualization support. This option is only
@@ -6792,17 +3785,6 @@ DEF("xen-domid-restrict", 0, QEMU_OPTION_xen_domid_restrict,
" to specified domain id. (Does not affect\n"
" xenpv machine type).\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -xen-domid @var{id}
-@findex -xen-domid
-Specify xen guest domain @var{id} (XEN only).
-@item -xen-attach
-@findex -xen-attach
-Attach to existing xen domain.
-libxl will use this when starting QEMU (XEN only).
-@findex -xen-domid-restrict
-Restrict set of available xen operations to specified domain id (XEN only).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-xen-domid id``
Specify xen guest domain id (XEN only).
@@ -6815,11 +3797,6 @@ ERST
DEF("no-reboot", 0, QEMU_OPTION_no_reboot, \
"-no-reboot exit instead of rebooting\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -no-reboot
-@findex -no-reboot
-Exit instead of rebooting.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-reboot``
Exit instead of rebooting.
@@ -6827,13 +3804,6 @@ ERST
DEF("no-shutdown", 0, QEMU_OPTION_no_shutdown, \
"-no-shutdown stop before shutdown\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -no-shutdown
-@findex -no-shutdown
-Don't exit QEMU on guest shutdown, but instead only stop the emulation.
-This allows for instance switching to monitor to commit changes to the
-disk image.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-shutdown``
Don't exit QEMU on guest shutdown, but instead only stop the
@@ -6845,11 +3815,6 @@ DEF("loadvm", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_loadvm, \
"-loadvm [tag|id]\n" \
" start right away with a saved state (loadvm in monitor)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -loadvm @var{file}
-@findex -loadvm
-Start right away with a saved state (@code{loadvm} in monitor)
-ETEXI
SRST
``-loadvm file``
Start right away with a saved state (``loadvm`` in monitor)
@@ -6859,14 +3824,6 @@ ERST
DEF("daemonize", 0, QEMU_OPTION_daemonize, \
"-daemonize daemonize QEMU after initializing\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
#endif
-STEXI
-@item -daemonize
-@findex -daemonize
-Daemonize the QEMU process after initialization. QEMU will not detach from
-standard IO until it is ready to receive connections on any of its devices.
-This option is a useful way for external programs to launch QEMU without having
-to cope with initialization race conditions.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-daemonize``
Daemonize the QEMU process after initialization. QEMU will not
@@ -6879,12 +3836,6 @@ ERST
DEF("option-rom", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_option_rom, \
"-option-rom rom load a file, rom, into the option ROM space\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -option-rom @var{file}
-@findex -option-rom
-Load the contents of @var{file} as an option ROM.
-This option is useful to load things like EtherBoot.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-option-rom file``
Load the contents of file as an option ROM. This option is useful to
@@ -6896,31 +3847,6 @@ DEF("rtc", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_rtc, \
" set the RTC base and clock, enable drift fix for clock ticks (x86 only)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-@item -rtc [base=utc|localtime|@var{datetime}][,clock=host|rt|vm][,driftfix=none|slew]
-@findex -rtc
-Specify @option{base} as @code{utc} or @code{localtime} to let the RTC start at the current
-UTC or local time, respectively. @code{localtime} is required for correct date in
-MS-DOS or Windows. To start at a specific point in time, provide @var{datetime} in the
-format @code{2006-06-17T16:01:21} or @code{2006-06-17}. The default base is UTC.
-
-By default the RTC is driven by the host system time. This allows using of the
-RTC as accurate reference clock inside the guest, specifically if the host
-time is smoothly following an accurate external reference clock, e.g. via NTP.
-If you want to isolate the guest time from the host, you can set @option{clock}
-to @code{rt} instead, which provides a host monotonic clock if host support it.
-To even prevent the RTC from progressing during suspension, you can set @option{clock}
-to @code{vm} (virtual clock). @samp{clock=vm} is recommended especially in
-icount mode in order to preserve determinism; however, note that in icount mode
-the speed of the virtual clock is variable and can in general differ from the
-host clock.
-
-Enable @option{driftfix} (i386 targets only) if you experience time drift problems,
-specifically with Windows' ACPI HAL. This option will try to figure out how
-many timer interrupts were not processed by the Windows guest and will
-re-inject them.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-rtc [base=utc|localtime|datetime][,clock=host|rt|vm][,driftfix=none|slew]``
Specify ``base`` as ``utc`` or ``localtime`` to let the RTC start at
@@ -6953,45 +3879,6 @@ DEF("icount", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_icount, \
" enable virtual instruction counter with 2^N clock ticks per\n" \
" instruction, enable aligning the host and virtual clocks\n" \
" or disable real time cpu sleeping\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -icount [shift=@var{N}|auto][,rr=record|replay,rrfile=@var{filename},rrsnapshot=@var{snapshot}]
-@findex -icount
-Enable virtual instruction counter. The virtual cpu will execute one
-instruction every 2^@var{N} ns of virtual time. If @code{auto} is specified
-then the virtual cpu speed will be automatically adjusted to keep virtual
-time within a few seconds of real time.
-
-When the virtual cpu is sleeping, the virtual time will advance at default
-speed unless @option{sleep=on|off} is specified.
-With @option{sleep=on|off}, the virtual time will jump to the next timer deadline
-instantly whenever the virtual cpu goes to sleep mode and will not advance
-if no timer is enabled. This behavior give deterministic execution times from
-the guest point of view.
-
-Note that while this option can give deterministic behavior, it does not
-provide cycle accurate emulation. Modern CPUs contain superscalar out of
-order cores with complex cache hierarchies. The number of instructions
-executed often has little or no correlation with actual performance.
-
-@option{align=on} will activate the delay algorithm which will try
-to synchronise the host clock and the virtual clock. The goal is to
-have a guest running at the real frequency imposed by the shift option.
-Whenever the guest clock is behind the host clock and if
-@option{align=on} is specified then we print a message to the user
-to inform about the delay.
-Currently this option does not work when @option{shift} is @code{auto}.
-Note: The sync algorithm will work for those shift values for which
-the guest clock runs ahead of the host clock. Typically this happens
-when the shift value is high (how high depends on the host machine).
-
-When @option{rr} option is specified deterministic record/replay is enabled.
-Replay log is written into @var{filename} file in record mode and
-read from this file in replay mode.
-
-Option rrsnapshot is used to create new vm snapshot named @var{snapshot}
-at the start of execution recording. In replay mode this option is used
-to load the initial VM state.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-icount [shift=N|auto][,rr=record|replay,rrfile=filename,rrsnapshot=snapshot]``
Enable virtual instruction counter. The virtual cpu will execute one
@@ -7036,30 +3923,6 @@ DEF("watchdog", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_watchdog, \
"-watchdog model\n" \
" enable virtual hardware watchdog [default=none]\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -watchdog @var{model}
-@findex -watchdog
-Create a virtual hardware watchdog device. Once enabled (by a guest
-action), the watchdog must be periodically polled by an agent inside
-the guest or else the guest will be restarted. Choose a model for
-which your guest has drivers.
-
-The @var{model} is the model of hardware watchdog to emulate. Use
-@code{-watchdog help} to list available hardware models. Only one
-watchdog can be enabled for a guest.
-
-The following models may be available:
-@table @option
-@item ib700
-iBASE 700 is a very simple ISA watchdog with a single timer.
-@item i6300esb
-Intel 6300ESB I/O controller hub is a much more featureful PCI-based
-dual-timer watchdog.
-@item diag288
-A virtual watchdog for s390x backed by the diagnose 288 hypercall
-(currently KVM only).
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-watchdog model``
Create a virtual hardware watchdog device. Once enabled (by a guest
@@ -7089,34 +3952,6 @@ DEF("watchdog-action", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_watchdog_action, \
"-watchdog-action reset|shutdown|poweroff|inject-nmi|pause|debug|none\n" \
" action when watchdog fires [default=reset]\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -watchdog-action @var{action}
-@findex -watchdog-action
-
-The @var{action} controls what QEMU will do when the watchdog timer
-expires.
-The default is
-@code{reset} (forcefully reset the guest).
-Other possible actions are:
-@code{shutdown} (attempt to gracefully shutdown the guest),
-@code{poweroff} (forcefully poweroff the guest),
-@code{inject-nmi} (inject a NMI into the guest),
-@code{pause} (pause the guest),
-@code{debug} (print a debug message and continue), or
-@code{none} (do nothing).
-
-Note that the @code{shutdown} action requires that the guest responds
-to ACPI signals, which it may not be able to do in the sort of
-situations where the watchdog would have expired, and thus
-@code{-watchdog-action shutdown} is not recommended for production use.
-
-Examples:
-
-@table @code
-@item -watchdog i6300esb -watchdog-action pause
-@itemx -watchdog ib700
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-watchdog-action action``
The action controls what QEMU will do when the watchdog timer
@@ -7141,22 +3976,6 @@ ERST
DEF("echr", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_echr, \
"-echr chr set terminal escape character instead of ctrl-a\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-
-@item -echr @var{numeric_ascii_value}
-@findex -echr
-Change the escape character used for switching to the monitor when using
-monitor and serial sharing. The default is @code{0x01} when using the
-@code{-nographic} option. @code{0x01} is equal to pressing
-@code{Control-a}. You can select a different character from the ascii
-control keys where 1 through 26 map to Control-a through Control-z. For
-instance you could use the either of the following to change the escape
-character to Control-t.
-@table @code
-@item -echr 0x14
-@itemx -echr 20
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-echr numeric_ascii_value``
Change the escape character used for switching to the monitor when
@@ -7173,11 +3992,6 @@ ERST
DEF("show-cursor", 0, QEMU_OPTION_show_cursor, \
"-show-cursor show cursor\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -show-cursor
-@findex -show-cursor
-Show cursor.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-show-cursor``
Show cursor.
@@ -7185,12 +3999,6 @@ ERST
DEF("tb-size", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_tb_size, \
"-tb-size n set TB size\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -tb-size @var{n}
-@findex -tb-size
-Set TCG translation block cache size. Deprecated, use @samp{-accel tcg,tb-size=@var{n}}
-instead.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-tb-size n``
Set TCG translation block cache size. Deprecated, use
@@ -7210,26 +4018,6 @@ DEF("incoming", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_incoming, \
"-incoming defer\n" \
" wait for the URI to be specified via migrate_incoming\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -incoming tcp:[@var{host}]:@var{port}[,to=@var{maxport}][,ipv4][,ipv6]
-@itemx -incoming rdma:@var{host}:@var{port}[,ipv4][,ipv6]
-@findex -incoming
-Prepare for incoming migration, listen on a given tcp port.
-
-@item -incoming unix:@var{socketpath}
-Prepare for incoming migration, listen on a given unix socket.
-
-@item -incoming fd:@var{fd}
-Accept incoming migration from a given filedescriptor.
-
-@item -incoming exec:@var{cmdline}
-Accept incoming migration as an output from specified external command.
-
-@item -incoming defer
-Wait for the URI to be specified via migrate_incoming. The monitor can
-be used to change settings (such as migration parameters) prior to issuing
-the migrate_incoming to allow the migration to begin.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-incoming tcp:[host]:port[,to=maxport][,ipv4][,ipv6]``
\
@@ -7254,12 +4042,6 @@ ERST
DEF("only-migratable", 0, QEMU_OPTION_only_migratable, \
"-only-migratable allow only migratable devices\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -only-migratable
-@findex -only-migratable
-Only allow migratable devices. Devices will not be allowed to enter an
-unmigratable state.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-only-migratable``
Only allow migratable devices. Devices will not be allowed to enter
@@ -7268,14 +4050,6 @@ ERST
DEF("nodefaults", 0, QEMU_OPTION_nodefaults, \
"-nodefaults don't create default devices\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -nodefaults
-@findex -nodefaults
-Don't create default devices. Normally, QEMU sets the default devices like serial
-port, parallel port, virtual console, monitor device, VGA adapter, floppy and
-CD-ROM drive and others. The @code{-nodefaults} option will disable all those
-default devices.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-nodefaults``
Don't create default devices. Normally, QEMU sets the default
@@ -7289,12 +4063,6 @@ DEF("chroot", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_chroot, \
"-chroot dir chroot to dir just before starting the VM\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
#endif
-STEXI
-@item -chroot @var{dir}
-@findex -chroot
-Immediately before starting guest execution, chroot to the specified
-directory. Especially useful in combination with -runas.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-chroot dir``
Immediately before starting guest execution, chroot to the specified
@@ -7307,12 +4075,6 @@ DEF("runas", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_runas, \
" user can be numeric uid:gid instead\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
#endif
-STEXI
-@item -runas @var{user}
-@findex -runas
-Immediately before starting guest execution, drop root privileges, switching
-to the specified user.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-runas user``
Immediately before starting guest execution, drop root privileges,
@@ -7323,23 +4085,6 @@ DEF("prom-env", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_prom_env,
"-prom-env variable=value\n"
" set OpenBIOS nvram variables\n",
QEMU_ARCH_PPC | QEMU_ARCH_SPARC)
-STEXI
-@item -prom-env @var{variable}=@var{value}
-@findex -prom-env
-Set OpenBIOS nvram @var{variable} to given @var{value} (PPC, SPARC only).
-
-@example
-qemu-system-sparc -prom-env 'auto-boot?=false' \
- -prom-env 'boot-device=sd(0,2,0):d' -prom-env 'boot-args=linux single'
-@end example
-
-@example
-qemu-system-ppc -prom-env 'auto-boot?=false' \
- -prom-env 'boot-device=hd:2,\yaboot' \
- -prom-env 'boot-args=conf=hd:2,\yaboot.conf'
-@end example
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-prom-env variable=value``
Set OpenBIOS nvram variable to given value (PPC, SPARC only).
@@ -7359,17 +4104,6 @@ DEF("semihosting", 0, QEMU_OPTION_semihosting,
"-semihosting semihosting mode\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ARM | QEMU_ARCH_M68K | QEMU_ARCH_XTENSA | QEMU_ARCH_LM32 |
QEMU_ARCH_MIPS | QEMU_ARCH_NIOS2)
-STEXI
-@item -semihosting
-@findex -semihosting
-Enable semihosting mode (ARM, M68K, Xtensa, MIPS, Nios II only).
-
-Note that this allows guest direct access to the host filesystem, so
-should only be used with a trusted guest OS.
-
-See the -semihosting-config option documentation for further information
-about the facilities this enables.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-semihosting``
Enable semihosting mode (ARM, M68K, Xtensa, MIPS, Nios II only).
@@ -7385,37 +4119,6 @@ DEF("semihosting-config", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_semihosting_config,
" semihosting configuration\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ARM | QEMU_ARCH_M68K | QEMU_ARCH_XTENSA | QEMU_ARCH_LM32 |
QEMU_ARCH_MIPS | QEMU_ARCH_NIOS2)
-STEXI
-@item -semihosting-config [enable=on|off][,target=native|gdb|auto][,chardev=id][,arg=str[,...]]
-@findex -semihosting-config
-Enable and configure semihosting (ARM, M68K, Xtensa, MIPS, Nios II only).
-
-Note that this allows guest direct access to the host filesystem, so
-should only be used with a trusted guest OS.
-
-On Arm this implements the standard semihosting API, version 2.0.
-
-On M68K this implements the "ColdFire GDB" interface used by libgloss.
-
-Xtensa semihosting provides basic file IO calls, such as
-open/read/write/seek/select. Tensilica baremetal libc for ISS and
-linux platform "sim" use this interface.
-
-@table @option
-@item target=@code{native|gdb|auto}
-Defines where the semihosting calls will be addressed, to QEMU (@code{native})
-or to GDB (@code{gdb}). The default is @code{auto}, which means @code{gdb}
-during debug sessions and @code{native} otherwise.
-@item chardev=@var{str1}
-Send the output to a chardev backend output for native or auto output when not in gdb
-@item arg=@var{str1},arg=@var{str2},...
-Allows the user to pass input arguments, and can be used multiple times to build
-up a list. The old-style @code{-kernel}/@code{-append} method of passing a
-command line is still supported for backward compatibility. If both the
-@code{--semihosting-config arg} and the @code{-kernel}/@code{-append} are
-specified, the former is passed to semihosting as it always takes precedence.
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-semihosting-config [enable=on|off][,target=native|gdb|auto][,chardev=id][,arg=str[,...]]``
Enable and configure semihosting (ARM, M68K, Xtensa, MIPS, Nios II
@@ -7453,11 +4156,6 @@ SRST
ERST
DEF("old-param", 0, QEMU_OPTION_old_param,
"-old-param old param mode\n", QEMU_ARCH_ARM)
-STEXI
-@item -old-param
-@findex -old-param (ARM)
-Old param mode (ARM only).
-ETEXI
SRST
``-old-param``
Old param mode (ARM only).
@@ -7478,22 +4176,6 @@ DEF("sandbox", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_sandbox, \
" blacklisting *fork and execve\n" \
" use 'resourcecontrol' to disable process affinity and schedular priority\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -sandbox @var{arg}[,obsolete=@var{string}][,elevateprivileges=@var{string}][,spawn=@var{string}][,resourcecontrol=@var{string}]
-@findex -sandbox
-Enable Seccomp mode 2 system call filter. 'on' will enable syscall filtering and 'off' will
-disable it. The default is 'off'.
-@table @option
-@item obsolete=@var{string}
-Enable Obsolete system calls
-@item elevateprivileges=@var{string}
-Disable set*uid|gid system calls
-@item spawn=@var{string}
-Disable *fork and execve
-@item resourcecontrol=@var{string}
-Disable process affinity and schedular priority
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-sandbox arg[,obsolete=string][,elevateprivileges=string][,spawn=string][,resourcecontrol=string]``
Enable Seccomp mode 2 system call filter. 'on' will enable syscall
@@ -7514,13 +4196,6 @@ ERST
DEF("readconfig", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_readconfig,
"-readconfig <file>\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -readconfig @var{file}
-@findex -readconfig
-Read device configuration from @var{file}. This approach is useful when you want to spawn
-QEMU process with many command line options but you don't want to exceed the command line
-character limit.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-readconfig file``
Read device configuration from file. This approach is useful when
@@ -7530,13 +4205,6 @@ ERST
DEF("writeconfig", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_writeconfig,
"-writeconfig <file>\n"
" read/write config file\n", QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -writeconfig @var{file}
-@findex -writeconfig
-Write device configuration to @var{file}. The @var{file} can be either filename to save
-command line and device configuration into file or dash @code{-}) character to print the
-output to stdout. This can be later used as input file for @code{-readconfig} option.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-writeconfig file``
Write device configuration to file. The file can be either filename
@@ -7549,12 +4217,6 @@ DEF("no-user-config", 0, QEMU_OPTION_nouserconfig,
"-no-user-config\n"
" do not load default user-provided config files at startup\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -no-user-config
-@findex -no-user-config
-The @code{-no-user-config} option makes QEMU not load any of the user-provided
-config files on @var{sysconfdir}.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-no-user-config``
The ``-no-user-config`` option makes QEMU not load any of the
@@ -7565,13 +4227,6 @@ DEF("trace", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_trace,
"-trace [[enable=]<pattern>][,events=<file>][,file=<file>]\n"
" specify tracing options\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-HXCOMM This line is not accurate, as some sub-options are backend-specific but
-HXCOMM HX does not support conditional compilation of text.
-@item -trace [[enable=]@var{pattern}][,events=@var{file}][,file=@var{file}]
-@findex -trace
-@include docs/system/qemu-option-trace.texi
-ETEXI
SRST
``-trace [[enable=]pattern][,events=file][,file=file]``
.. include:: ../qemu-option-trace.rst.inc
@@ -7581,19 +4236,6 @@ DEF("plugin", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_plugin,
"-plugin [file=]<file>[,arg=<string>]\n"
" load a plugin\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -plugin file=@var{file}[,arg=@var{string}]
-@findex -plugin
-
-Load a plugin.
-
-@table @option
-@item file=@var{file}
-Load the given plugin from a shared library file.
-@item arg=@var{string}
-Argument string passed to the plugin. (Can be given multiple times.)
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-plugin file=file[,arg=string]``
Load a plugin.
@@ -7615,11 +4257,6 @@ DEF("enable-fips", 0, QEMU_OPTION_enablefips,
"-enable-fips enable FIPS 140-2 compliance\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
#endif
-STEXI
-@item -enable-fips
-@findex -enable-fips
-Enable FIPS 140-2 compliance mode.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-enable-fips``
Enable FIPS 140-2 compliance mode.
@@ -7633,15 +4270,6 @@ DEF("msg", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_msg,
" control error message format\n"
" timestamp=on enables timestamps (default: off)\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -msg timestamp[=on|off]
-@findex -msg
-Control error message format.
-@table @option
-@item timestamp=on|off
-Prefix messages with a timestamp. Default is off.
-@end table
-ETEXI
SRST
``-msg timestamp[=on|off]``
Control error message format.
@@ -7657,12 +4285,6 @@ DEF("dump-vmstate", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_dump_vmstate,
" check for possible regressions in migration code\n"
" by comparing two such vmstate dumps.\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -dump-vmstate @var{file}
-@findex -dump-vmstate
-Dump json-encoded vmstate information for current machine type to file
-in @var{file}
-ETEXI
SRST
``-dump-vmstate file``
Dump json-encoded vmstate information for current machine type to
@@ -7673,25 +4295,14 @@ DEF("enable-sync-profile", 0, QEMU_OPTION_enable_sync_profile,
"-enable-sync-profile\n"
" enable synchronization profiling\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -enable-sync-profile
-@findex -enable-sync-profile
-Enable synchronization profiling.
-ETEXI
SRST
``-enable-sync-profile``
Enable synchronization profiling.
ERST
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI
DEFHEADING()
DEFHEADING(Generic object creation:)
-STEXI
-@table @option
-ETEXI
DEF("object", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_object,
"-object TYPENAME[,PROP1=VALUE1,...]\n"
@@ -7700,689 +4311,6 @@ DEF("object", HAS_ARG, QEMU_OPTION_object,
" property must be set. These objects are placed in the\n"
" '/objects' path.\n",
QEMU_ARCH_ALL)
-STEXI
-@item -object @var{typename}[,@var{prop1}=@var{value1},...]
-@findex -object
-Create a new object of type @var{typename} setting properties
-in the order they are specified. Note that the 'id'
-property must be set. These objects are placed in the
-'/objects' path.
-
-@table @option
-
-@item -object memory-backend-file,id=@var{id},size=@var{size},mem-path=@var{dir},share=@var{on|off},discard-data=@var{on|off},merge=@var{on|off},dump=@var{on|off},prealloc=@var{on|off},host-nodes=@var{host-nodes},policy=@var{default|preferred|bind|interleave},align=@var{align}
-
-Creates a memory file backend object, which can be used to back
-the guest RAM with huge pages.
-
-The @option{id} parameter is a unique ID that will be used to reference this
-memory region when configuring the @option{-numa} argument.
-
-The @option{size} option provides the size of the memory region, and accepts
-common suffixes, eg @option{500M}.
-
-The @option{mem-path} provides the path to either a shared memory or huge page
-filesystem mount.
-
-The @option{share} boolean option determines whether the memory
-region is marked as private to QEMU, or shared. The latter allows
-a co-operating external process to access the QEMU memory region.
-
-The @option{share} is also required for pvrdma devices due to
-limitations in the RDMA API provided by Linux.
-
-Setting share=on might affect the ability to configure NUMA
-bindings for the memory backend under some circumstances, see
-Documentation/vm/numa_memory_policy.txt on the Linux kernel
-source tree for additional details.
-
-Setting the @option{discard-data} boolean option to @var{on}
-indicates that file contents can be destroyed when QEMU exits,
-to avoid unnecessarily flushing data to the backing file. Note
-that @option{discard-data} is only an optimization, and QEMU
-might not discard file contents if it aborts unexpectedly or is
-terminated using SIGKILL.
-
-The @option{merge} boolean option enables memory merge, also known as
-MADV_MERGEABLE, so that Kernel Samepage Merging will consider the pages for
-memory deduplication.
-
-Setting the @option{dump} boolean option to @var{off} excludes the memory from
-core dumps. This feature is also known as MADV_DONTDUMP.
-
-The @option{prealloc} boolean option enables memory preallocation.
-
-The @option{host-nodes} option binds the memory range to a list of NUMA host
-nodes.
-
-The @option{policy} option sets the NUMA policy to one of the following values:
-
-@table @option
-@item @var{default}
-default host policy
-
-@item @var{preferred}
-prefer the given host node list for allocation
-
-@item @var{bind}
-restrict memory allocation to the given host node list
-
-@item @var{interleave}
-interleave memory allocations across the given host node list
-@end table
-
-The @option{align} option specifies the base address alignment when
-QEMU mmap(2) @option{mem-path}, and accepts common suffixes, eg
-@option{2M}. Some backend store specified by @option{mem-path}
-requires an alignment different than the default one used by QEMU, eg
-the device DAX /dev/dax0.0 requires 2M alignment rather than 4K. In
-such cases, users can specify the required alignment via this option.
-
-The @option{pmem} option specifies whether the backing file specified
-by @option{mem-path} is in host persistent memory that can be accessed
-using the SNIA NVM programming model (e.g. Intel NVDIMM).
-If @option{pmem} is set to 'on', QEMU will take necessary operations to
-guarantee the persistence of its own writes to @option{mem-path}
-(e.g. in vNVDIMM label emulation and live migration).
-Also, we will map the backend-file with MAP_SYNC flag, which ensures the
-file metadata is in sync for @option{mem-path} in case of host crash
-or a power failure. MAP_SYNC requires support from both the host kernel
-(since Linux kernel 4.15) and the filesystem of @option{mem-path} mounted
-with DAX option.
-
-@item -object memory-backend-ram,id=@var{id},merge=@var{on|off},dump=@var{on|off},share=@var{on|off},prealloc=@var{on|off},size=@var{size},host-nodes=@var{host-nodes},policy=@var{default|preferred|bind|interleave}
-
-Creates a memory backend object, which can be used to back the guest RAM.
-Memory backend objects offer more control than the @option{-m} option that is
-traditionally used to define guest RAM. Please refer to
-@option{memory-backend-file} for a description of the options.
-
-@item -object memory-backend-memfd,id=@var{id},merge=@var{on|off},dump=@var{on|off},share=@var{on|off},prealloc=@var{on|off},size=@var{size},host-nodes=@var{host-nodes},policy=@var{default|preferred|bind|interleave},seal=@var{on|off},hugetlb=@var{on|off},hugetlbsize=@var{size}
-
-Creates an anonymous memory file backend object, which allows QEMU to
-share the memory with an external process (e.g. when using
-vhost-user). The memory is allocated with memfd and optional
-sealing. (Linux only)
-
-The @option{seal} option creates a sealed-file, that will block
-further resizing the memory ('on' by default).
-
-The @option{hugetlb} option specify the file to be created resides in
-the hugetlbfs filesystem (since Linux 4.14). Used in conjunction with
-the @option{hugetlb} option, the @option{hugetlbsize} option specify
-the hugetlb page size on systems that support multiple hugetlb page
-sizes (it must be a power of 2 value supported by the system).
-
-In some versions of Linux, the @option{hugetlb} option is incompatible
-with the @option{seal} option (requires at least Linux 4.16).
-
-Please refer to @option{memory-backend-file} for a description of the
-other options.
-
-The @option{share} boolean option is @var{on} by default with memfd.
-
-@item -object rng-builtin,id=@var{id}
-
-Creates a random number generator backend which obtains entropy from
-QEMU builtin functions. The @option{id} parameter is a unique ID that
-will be used to reference this entropy backend from the @option{virtio-rng}
-device. By default, the @option{virtio-rng} device uses this RNG backend.
-
-@item -object rng-random,id=@var{id},filename=@var{/dev/random}
-
-Creates a random number generator backend which obtains entropy from
-a device on the host. The @option{id} parameter is a unique ID that
-will be used to reference this entropy backend from the @option{virtio-rng}
-device. The @option{filename} parameter specifies which file to obtain
-entropy from and if omitted defaults to @option{/dev/urandom}.
-
-@item -object rng-egd,id=@var{id},chardev=@var{chardevid}
-
-Creates a random number generator backend which obtains entropy from
-an external daemon running on the host. The @option{id} parameter is
-a unique ID that will be used to reference this entropy backend from
-the @option{virtio-rng} device. The @option{chardev} parameter is
-the unique ID of a character device backend that provides the connection
-to the RNG daemon.
-
-@item -object tls-creds-anon,id=@var{id},endpoint=@var{endpoint},dir=@var{/path/to/cred/dir},verify-peer=@var{on|off}
-
-Creates a TLS anonymous credentials object, which can be used to provide
-TLS support on network backends. The @option{id} parameter is a unique
-ID which network backends will use to access the credentials. The
-@option{endpoint} is either @option{server} or @option{client} depending
-on whether the QEMU network backend that uses the credentials will be
-acting as a client or as a server. If @option{verify-peer} is enabled
-(the default) then once the handshake is completed, the peer credentials
-will be verified, though this is a no-op for anonymous credentials.
-
-The @var{dir} parameter tells QEMU where to find the credential
-files. For server endpoints, this directory may contain a file
-@var{dh-params.pem} providing diffie-hellman parameters to use
-for the TLS server. If the file is missing, QEMU will generate
-a set of DH parameters at startup. This is a computationally
-expensive operation that consumes random pool entropy, so it is
-recommended that a persistent set of parameters be generated
-upfront and saved.
-
-@item -object tls-creds-psk,id=@var{id},endpoint=@var{endpoint},dir=@var{/path/to/keys/dir}[,username=@var{username}]
-
-Creates a TLS Pre-Shared Keys (PSK) credentials object, which can be used to provide
-TLS support on network backends. The @option{id} parameter is a unique
-ID which network backends will use to access the credentials. The
-@option{endpoint} is either @option{server} or @option{client} depending
-on whether the QEMU network backend that uses the credentials will be
-acting as a client or as a server. For clients only, @option{username}
-is the username which will be sent to the server. If omitted
-it defaults to ``qemu''.
-
-The @var{dir} parameter tells QEMU where to find the keys file.
-It is called ``@var{dir}/keys.psk'' and contains ``username:key''
-pairs. This file can most easily be created using the GnuTLS
-@code{psktool} program.
-
-For server endpoints, @var{dir} may also contain a file
-@var{dh-params.pem} providing diffie-hellman parameters to use
-for the TLS server. If the file is missing, QEMU will generate
-a set of DH parameters at startup. This is a computationally
-expensive operation that consumes random pool entropy, so it is
-recommended that a persistent set of parameters be generated
-up front and saved.
-
-@item -object tls-creds-x509,id=@var{id},endpoint=@var{endpoint},dir=@var{/path/to/cred/dir},priority=@var{priority},verify-peer=@var{on|off},passwordid=@var{id}
-
-Creates a TLS anonymous credentials object, which can be used to provide
-TLS support on network backends. The @option{id} parameter is a unique
-ID which network backends will use to access the credentials. The
-@option{endpoint} is either @option{server} or @option{client} depending
-on whether the QEMU network backend that uses the credentials will be
-acting as a client or as a server. If @option{verify-peer} is enabled
-(the default) then once the handshake is completed, the peer credentials
-will be verified. With x509 certificates, this implies that the clients
-must be provided with valid client certificates too.
-
-The @var{dir} parameter tells QEMU where to find the credential
-files. For server endpoints, this directory may contain a file
-@var{dh-params.pem} providing diffie-hellman parameters to use
-for the TLS server. If the file is missing, QEMU will generate
-a set of DH parameters at startup. This is a computationally
-expensive operation that consumes random pool entropy, so it is
-recommended that a persistent set of parameters be generated
-upfront and saved.
-
-For x509 certificate credentials the directory will contain further files
-providing the x509 certificates. The certificates must be stored
-in PEM format, in filenames @var{ca-cert.pem}, @var{ca-crl.pem} (optional),
-@var{server-cert.pem} (only servers), @var{server-key.pem} (only servers),
-@var{client-cert.pem} (only clients), and @var{client-key.pem} (only clients).
-
-For the @var{server-key.pem} and @var{client-key.pem} files which
-contain sensitive private keys, it is possible to use an encrypted
-version by providing the @var{passwordid} parameter. This provides
-the ID of a previously created @code{secret} object containing the
-password for decryption.
-
-The @var{priority} parameter allows to override the global default
-priority used by gnutls. This can be useful if the system administrator
-needs to use a weaker set of crypto priorities for QEMU without
-potentially forcing the weakness onto all applications. Or conversely
-if one wants wants a stronger default for QEMU than for all other
-applications, they can do this through this parameter. Its format is
-a gnutls priority string as described at
-@url{https://gnutls.org/manual/html_node/Priority-Strings.html}.
-
-@item -object filter-buffer,id=@var{id},netdev=@var{netdevid},interval=@var{t}[,queue=@var{all|rx|tx}][,status=@var{on|off}][,position=@var{head|tail|id=<id>}][,insert=@var{behind|before}]
-
-Interval @var{t} can't be 0, this filter batches the packet delivery: all
-packets arriving in a given interval on netdev @var{netdevid} are delayed
-until the end of the interval. Interval is in microseconds.
-@option{status} is optional that indicate whether the netfilter is
-on (enabled) or off (disabled), the default status for netfilter will be 'on'.
-
-queue @var{all|rx|tx} is an option that can be applied to any netfilter.
-
-@option{all}: the filter is attached both to the receive and the transmit
- queue of the netdev (default).
-
-@option{rx}: the filter is attached to the receive queue of the netdev,
- where it will receive packets sent to the netdev.
-
-@option{tx}: the filter is attached to the transmit queue of the netdev,
- where it will receive packets sent by the netdev.
-
-position @var{head|tail|id=<id>} is an option to specify where the
-filter should be inserted in the filter list. It can be applied to any
-netfilter.
-
-@option{head}: the filter is inserted at the head of the filter
- list, before any existing filters.
-
-@option{tail}: the filter is inserted at the tail of the filter
- list, behind any existing filters (default).
-
-@option{id=<id>}: the filter is inserted before or behind the filter
- specified by <id>, see the insert option below.
-
-insert @var{behind|before} is an option to specify where to insert the
-new filter relative to the one specified with position=id=<id>. It can
-be applied to any netfilter.
-
-@option{before}: insert before the specified filter.
-
-@option{behind}: insert behind the specified filter (default).
-
-@item -object filter-mirror,id=@var{id},netdev=@var{netdevid},outdev=@var{chardevid},queue=@var{all|rx|tx}[,vnet_hdr_support][,position=@var{head|tail|id=<id>}][,insert=@var{behind|before}]
-
-filter-mirror on netdev @var{netdevid},mirror net packet to chardev@var{chardevid}, if it has the vnet_hdr_support flag, filter-mirror will mirror packet with vnet_hdr_len.
-
-@item -object filter-redirector,id=@var{id},netdev=@var{netdevid},indev=@var{chardevid},outdev=@var{chardevid},queue=@var{all|rx|tx}[,vnet_hdr_support][,position=@var{head|tail|id=<id>}][,insert=@var{behind|before}]
-
-filter-redirector on netdev @var{netdevid},redirect filter's net packet to chardev
-@var{chardevid},and redirect indev's packet to filter.if it has the vnet_hdr_support flag,
-filter-redirector will redirect packet with vnet_hdr_len.
-Create a filter-redirector we need to differ outdev id from indev id, id can not
-be the same. we can just use indev or outdev, but at least one of indev or outdev
-need to be specified.
-
-@item -object filter-rewriter,id=@var{id},netdev=@var{netdevid},queue=@var{all|rx|tx},[vnet_hdr_support][,position=@var{head|tail|id=<id>}][,insert=@var{behind|before}]
-
-Filter-rewriter is a part of COLO project.It will rewrite tcp packet to
-secondary from primary to keep secondary tcp connection,and rewrite
-tcp packet to primary from secondary make tcp packet can be handled by
-client.if it has the vnet_hdr_support flag, we can parse packet with vnet header.
-
-usage:
-colo secondary:
--object filter-redirector,id=f1,netdev=hn0,queue=tx,indev=red0
--object filter-redirector,id=f2,netdev=hn0,queue=rx,outdev=red1
--object filter-rewriter,id=rew0,netdev=hn0,queue=all
-
-@item -object filter-dump,id=@var{id},netdev=@var{dev}[,file=@var{filename}][,maxlen=@var{len}][,position=@var{head|tail|id=<id>}][,insert=@var{behind|before}]
-
-Dump the network traffic on netdev @var{dev} to the file specified by
-@var{filename}. At most @var{len} bytes (64k by default) per packet are stored.
-The file format is libpcap, so it can be analyzed with tools such as tcpdump
-or Wireshark.
-
-@item -object colo-compare,id=@var{id},primary_in=@var{chardevid},secondary_in=@var{chardevid},outdev=@var{chardevid},iothread=@var{id}[,vnet_hdr_support][,notify_dev=@var{id}]
-
-Colo-compare gets packet from primary_in@var{chardevid} and secondary_in@var{chardevid}, than compare primary packet with
-secondary packet. If the packets are same, we will output primary
-packet to outdev@var{chardevid}, else we will notify colo-frame
-do checkpoint and send primary packet to outdev@var{chardevid}.
-In order to improve efficiency, we need to put the task of comparison
-in another thread. If it has the vnet_hdr_support flag, colo compare
-will send/recv packet with vnet_hdr_len.
-If you want to use Xen COLO, will need the notify_dev to notify Xen
-colo-frame to do checkpoint.
-
-we must use it with the help of filter-mirror and filter-redirector.
-
-@example
-
-KVM COLO
-
-primary:
--netdev tap,id=hn0,vhost=off,script=/etc/qemu-ifup,downscript=/etc/qemu-ifdown
--device e1000,id=e0,netdev=hn0,mac=52:a4:00:12:78:66
--chardev socket,id=mirror0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9003,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare1,host=3.3.3.3,port=9004,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9001,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare0-0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9001
--chardev socket,id=compare_out,host=3.3.3.3,port=9005,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare_out0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9005
--object iothread,id=iothread1
--object filter-mirror,id=m0,netdev=hn0,queue=tx,outdev=mirror0
--object filter-redirector,netdev=hn0,id=redire0,queue=rx,indev=compare_out
--object filter-redirector,netdev=hn0,id=redire1,queue=rx,outdev=compare0
--object colo-compare,id=comp0,primary_in=compare0-0,secondary_in=compare1,outdev=compare_out0,iothread=iothread1
-
-secondary:
--netdev tap,id=hn0,vhost=off,script=/etc/qemu-ifup,down script=/etc/qemu-ifdown
--device e1000,netdev=hn0,mac=52:a4:00:12:78:66
--chardev socket,id=red0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9003
--chardev socket,id=red1,host=3.3.3.3,port=9004
--object filter-redirector,id=f1,netdev=hn0,queue=tx,indev=red0
--object filter-redirector,id=f2,netdev=hn0,queue=rx,outdev=red1
-
-
-Xen COLO
-
-primary:
--netdev tap,id=hn0,vhost=off,script=/etc/qemu-ifup,downscript=/etc/qemu-ifdown
--device e1000,id=e0,netdev=hn0,mac=52:a4:00:12:78:66
--chardev socket,id=mirror0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9003,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare1,host=3.3.3.3,port=9004,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9001,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare0-0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9001
--chardev socket,id=compare_out,host=3.3.3.3,port=9005,server,nowait
--chardev socket,id=compare_out0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9005
--chardev socket,id=notify_way,host=3.3.3.3,port=9009,server,nowait
--object filter-mirror,id=m0,netdev=hn0,queue=tx,outdev=mirror0
--object filter-redirector,netdev=hn0,id=redire0,queue=rx,indev=compare_out
--object filter-redirector,netdev=hn0,id=redire1,queue=rx,outdev=compare0
--object iothread,id=iothread1
--object colo-compare,id=comp0,primary_in=compare0-0,secondary_in=compare1,outdev=compare_out0,notify_dev=nofity_way,iothread=iothread1
-
-secondary:
--netdev tap,id=hn0,vhost=off,script=/etc/qemu-ifup,down script=/etc/qemu-ifdown
--device e1000,netdev=hn0,mac=52:a4:00:12:78:66
--chardev socket,id=red0,host=3.3.3.3,port=9003
--chardev socket,id=red1,host=3.3.3.3,port=9004
--object filter-redirector,id=f1,netdev=hn0,queue=tx,indev=red0
--object filter-redirector,id=f2,netdev=hn0,queue=rx,outdev=red1
-
-@end example
-
-If you want to know the detail of above command line, you can read
-the colo-compare git log.
-
-@item -object cryptodev-backend-builtin,id=@var{id}[,queues=@var{queues}]
-
-Creates a cryptodev backend which executes crypto opreation from
-the QEMU cipher APIS. The @var{id} parameter is
-a unique ID that will be used to reference this cryptodev backend from
-the @option{virtio-crypto} device. The @var{queues} parameter is optional,
-which specify the queue number of cryptodev backend, the default of
-@var{queues} is 1.
-
-@example
-
- # @value{qemu_system} \
- [...] \
- -object cryptodev-backend-builtin,id=cryptodev0 \
- -device virtio-crypto-pci,id=crypto0,cryptodev=cryptodev0 \
- [...]
-@end example
-
-@item -object cryptodev-vhost-user,id=@var{id},chardev=@var{chardevid}[,queues=@var{queues}]
-
-Creates a vhost-user cryptodev backend, backed by a chardev @var{chardevid}.
-The @var{id} parameter is a unique ID that will be used to reference this
-cryptodev backend from the @option{virtio-crypto} device.
-The chardev should be a unix domain socket backed one. The vhost-user uses
-a specifically defined protocol to pass vhost ioctl replacement messages
-to an application on the other end of the socket.
-The @var{queues} parameter is optional, which specify the queue number
-of cryptodev backend for multiqueue vhost-user, the default of @var{queues} is 1.
-
-@example
-
- # @value{qemu_system} \
- [...] \
- -chardev socket,id=chardev0,path=/path/to/socket \
- -object cryptodev-vhost-user,id=cryptodev0,chardev=chardev0 \
- -device virtio-crypto-pci,id=crypto0,cryptodev=cryptodev0 \
- [...]
-@end example
-
-@item -object secret,id=@var{id},data=@var{string},format=@var{raw|base64}[,keyid=@var{secretid},iv=@var{string}]
-@item -object secret,id=@var{id},file=@var{filename},format=@var{raw|base64}[,keyid=@var{secretid},iv=@var{string}]
-
-Defines a secret to store a password, encryption key, or some other sensitive
-data. The sensitive data can either be passed directly via the @var{data}
-parameter, or indirectly via the @var{file} parameter. Using the @var{data}
-parameter is insecure unless the sensitive data is encrypted.
-
-The sensitive data can be provided in raw format (the default), or base64.
-When encoded as JSON, the raw format only supports valid UTF-8 characters,
-so base64 is recommended for sending binary data. QEMU will convert from
-which ever format is provided to the format it needs internally. eg, an
-RBD password can be provided in raw format, even though it will be base64
-encoded when passed onto the RBD sever.
-
-For added protection, it is possible to encrypt the data associated with
-a secret using the AES-256-CBC cipher. Use of encryption is indicated
-by providing the @var{keyid} and @var{iv} parameters. The @var{keyid}
-parameter provides the ID of a previously defined secret that contains
-the AES-256 decryption key. This key should be 32-bytes long and be
-base64 encoded. The @var{iv} parameter provides the random initialization
-vector used for encryption of this particular secret and should be a
-base64 encrypted string of the 16-byte IV.
-
-The simplest (insecure) usage is to provide the secret inline
-
-@example
-
- # @value{qemu_system} -object secret,id=sec0,data=letmein,format=raw
-
-@end example
-
-The simplest secure usage is to provide the secret via a file
-
- # printf "letmein" > mypasswd.txt
- # @value{qemu_system} -object secret,id=sec0,file=mypasswd.txt,format=raw
-
-For greater security, AES-256-CBC should be used. To illustrate usage,
-consider the openssl command line tool which can encrypt the data. Note
-that when encrypting, the plaintext must be padded to the cipher block
-size (32 bytes) using the standard PKCS#5/6 compatible padding algorithm.
-
-First a master key needs to be created in base64 encoding:
-
-@example
- # openssl rand -base64 32 > key.b64
- # KEY=$(base64 -d key.b64 | hexdump -v -e '/1 "%02X"')
-@end example
-
-Each secret to be encrypted needs to have a random initialization vector
-generated. These do not need to be kept secret
-
-@example
- # openssl rand -base64 16 > iv.b64
- # IV=$(base64 -d iv.b64 | hexdump -v -e '/1 "%02X"')
-@end example
-
-The secret to be defined can now be encrypted, in this case we're
-telling openssl to base64 encode the result, but it could be left
-as raw bytes if desired.
-
-@example
- # SECRET=$(printf "letmein" |
- openssl enc -aes-256-cbc -a -K $KEY -iv $IV)
-@end example
-
-When launching QEMU, create a master secret pointing to @code{key.b64}
-and specify that to be used to decrypt the user password. Pass the
-contents of @code{iv.b64} to the second secret
-
-@example
- # @value{qemu_system} \
- -object secret,id=secmaster0,format=base64,file=key.b64 \
- -object secret,id=sec0,keyid=secmaster0,format=base64,\
- data=$SECRET,iv=$(<iv.b64)
-@end example
-
-@item -object sev-guest,id=@var{id},cbitpos=@var{cbitpos},reduced-phys-bits=@var{val},[sev-device=@var{string},policy=@var{policy},handle=@var{handle},dh-cert-file=@var{file},session-file=@var{file}]
-
-Create a Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) guest object, which can be used
-to provide the guest memory encryption support on AMD processors.
-
-When memory encryption is enabled, one of the physical address bit (aka the
-C-bit) is utilized to mark if a memory page is protected. The @option{cbitpos}
-is used to provide the C-bit position. The C-bit position is Host family dependent
-hence user must provide this value. On EPYC, the value should be 47.
-
-When memory encryption is enabled, we loose certain bits in physical address space.
-The @option{reduced-phys-bits} is used to provide the number of bits we loose in
-physical address space. Similar to C-bit, the value is Host family dependent.
-On EPYC, the value should be 5.
-
-The @option{sev-device} provides the device file to use for communicating with
-the SEV firmware running inside AMD Secure Processor. The default device is
-'/dev/sev'. If hardware supports memory encryption then /dev/sev devices are
-created by CCP driver.
-
-The @option{policy} provides the guest policy to be enforced by the SEV firmware
-and restrict what configuration and operational commands can be performed on this
-guest by the hypervisor. The policy should be provided by the guest owner and is
-bound to the guest and cannot be changed throughout the lifetime of the guest.
-The default is 0.
-
-If guest @option{policy} allows sharing the key with another SEV guest then
-@option{handle} can be use to provide handle of the guest from which to share
-the key.
-
-The @option{dh-cert-file} and @option{session-file} provides the guest owner's
-Public Diffie-Hillman key defined in SEV spec. The PDH and session parameters
-are used for establishing a cryptographic session with the guest owner to
-negotiate keys used for attestation. The file must be encoded in base64.
-
-e.g to launch a SEV guest
-@example
- # @value{qemu_system_x86} \
- ......
- -object sev-guest,id=sev0,cbitpos=47,reduced-phys-bits=5 \
- -machine ...,memory-encryption=sev0
- .....
-
-@end example
-
-
-@item -object authz-simple,id=@var{id},identity=@var{string}
-
-Create an authorization object that will control access to network services.
-
-The @option{identity} parameter is identifies the user and its format
-depends on the network service that authorization object is associated
-with. For authorizing based on TLS x509 certificates, the identity must
-be the x509 distinguished name. Note that care must be taken to escape
-any commas in the distinguished name.
-
-An example authorization object to validate a x509 distinguished name
-would look like:
-@example
- # @value{qemu_system} \
- ...
- -object 'authz-simple,id=auth0,identity=CN=laptop.example.com,,O=Example Org,,L=London,,ST=London,,C=GB' \
- ...
-@end example
-
-Note the use of quotes due to the x509 distinguished name containing
-whitespace, and escaping of ','.
-
-@item -object authz-listfile,id=@var{id},filename=@var{path},refresh=@var{yes|no}
-
-Create an authorization object that will control access to network services.
-
-The @option{filename} parameter is the fully qualified path to a file
-containing the access control list rules in JSON format.
-
-An example set of rules that match against SASL usernames might look
-like:
-
-@example
- @{
- "rules": [
- @{ "match": "fred", "policy": "allow", "format": "exact" @},
- @{ "match": "bob", "policy": "allow", "format": "exact" @},
- @{ "match": "danb", "policy": "deny", "format": "glob" @},
- @{ "match": "dan*", "policy": "allow", "format": "exact" @},
- ],
- "policy": "deny"
- @}
-@end example
-
-When checking access the object will iterate over all the rules and
-the first rule to match will have its @option{policy} value returned
-as the result. If no rules match, then the default @option{policy}
-value is returned.
-
-The rules can either be an exact string match, or they can use the
-simple UNIX glob pattern matching to allow wildcards to be used.
-
-If @option{refresh} is set to true the file will be monitored
-and automatically reloaded whenever its content changes.
-
-As with the @code{authz-simple} object, the format of the identity
-strings being matched depends on the network service, but is usually
-a TLS x509 distinguished name, or a SASL username.
-
-An example authorization object to validate a SASL username
-would look like:
-@example
- # @value{qemu_system} \
- ...
- -object authz-simple,id=auth0,filename=/etc/qemu/vnc-sasl.acl,refresh=yes
- ...
-@end example
-
-@item -object authz-pam,id=@var{id},service=@var{string}
-
-Create an authorization object that will control access to network services.
-
-The @option{service} parameter provides the name of a PAM service to use
-for authorization. It requires that a file @code{/etc/pam.d/@var{service}}
-exist to provide the configuration for the @code{account} subsystem.
-
-An example authorization object to validate a TLS x509 distinguished
-name would look like:
-
-@example
- # @value{qemu_system} \
- ...
- -object authz-pam,id=auth0,service=qemu-vnc
- ...
-@end example
-
-There would then be a corresponding config file for PAM at
-@code{/etc/pam.d/qemu-vnc} that contains:
-
-@example
-account requisite pam_listfile.so item=user sense=allow \
- file=/etc/qemu/vnc.allow
-@end example
-
-Finally the @code{/etc/qemu/vnc.allow} file would contain
-the list of x509 distingished names that are permitted
-access
-
-@example
-CN=laptop.example.com,O=Example Home,L=London,ST=London,C=GB
-@end example
-
-@item -object iothread,id=@var{id},poll-max-ns=@var{poll-max-ns},poll-grow=@var{poll-grow},poll-shrink=@var{poll-shrink}
-
-Creates a dedicated event loop thread that devices can be assigned to. This is
-known as an IOThread. By default device emulation happens in vCPU threads or
-the main event loop thread. This can become a scalability bottleneck.
-IOThreads allow device emulation and I/O to run on other host CPUs.
-
-The @option{id} parameter is a unique ID that will be used to reference this
-IOThread from @option{-device ...,iothread=@var{id}}. Multiple devices can be
-assigned to an IOThread. Note that not all devices support an
-@option{iothread} parameter.
-
-The @code{query-iothreads} QMP command lists IOThreads and reports their thread
-IDs so that the user can configure host CPU pinning/affinity.
-
-IOThreads use an adaptive polling algorithm to reduce event loop latency.
-Instead of entering a blocking system call to monitor file descriptors and then
-pay the cost of being woken up when an event occurs, the polling algorithm
-spins waiting for events for a short time. The algorithm's default parameters
-are suitable for many cases but can be adjusted based on knowledge of the
-workload and/or host device latency.
-
-The @option{poll-max-ns} parameter is the maximum number of nanoseconds to busy
-wait for events. Polling can be disabled by setting this value to 0.
-
-The @option{poll-grow} parameter is the multiplier used to increase the polling
-time when the algorithm detects it is missing events due to not polling long
-enough.
-
-The @option{poll-shrink} parameter is the divisor used to decrease the polling
-time when the algorithm detects it is spending too long polling without
-encountering events.
-
-The polling parameters can be modified at run-time using the @code{qom-set} command (where @code{iothread1} is the IOThread's @code{id}):
-
-@example
-(qemu) qom-set /objects/iothread1 poll-max-ns 100000
-@end example
-
-@end table
-
-ETEXI
SRST
``-object typename[,prop1=value1,...]``
Create a new object of type typename setting properties in the order
@@ -9077,6 +5005,3 @@ ERST
HXCOMM This is the last statement. Insert new options before this line!
-STEXI
-@end table
-ETEXI