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Diffstat (limited to 'arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/types.h')
-rw-r--r--arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/types.h72
1 files changed, 38 insertions, 34 deletions
diff --git a/arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/types.h b/arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/types.h
index 0637826292de..c49c5173158e 100644
--- a/arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/types.h
+++ b/arch/x86/include/asm/fpu/types.h
@@ -189,6 +189,7 @@ union fpregs_state {
struct fxregs_state fxsave;
struct swregs_state soft;
struct xregs_state xsave;
+ u8 __padding[PAGE_SIZE];
};
/*
@@ -198,40 +199,6 @@ union fpregs_state {
*/
struct fpu {
/*
- * @state:
- *
- * In-memory copy of all FPU registers that we save/restore
- * over context switches. If the task is using the FPU then
- * the registers in the FPU are more recent than this state
- * copy. If the task context-switches away then they get
- * saved here and represent the FPU state.
- *
- * After context switches there may be a (short) time period
- * during which the in-FPU hardware registers are unchanged
- * and still perfectly match this state, if the tasks
- * scheduled afterwards are not using the FPU.
- *
- * This is the 'lazy restore' window of optimization, which
- * we track though 'fpu_fpregs_owner_ctx' and 'fpu->last_cpu'.
- *
- * We detect whether a subsequent task uses the FPU via setting
- * CR0::TS to 1, which causes any FPU use to raise a #NM fault.
- *
- * During this window, if the task gets scheduled again, we
- * might be able to skip having to do a restore from this
- * memory buffer to the hardware registers - at the cost of
- * incurring the overhead of #NM fault traps.
- *
- * Note that on modern CPUs that support the XSAVEOPT (or other
- * optimized XSAVE instructions), we don't use #NM traps anymore,
- * as the hardware can track whether FPU registers need saving
- * or not. On such CPUs we activate the non-lazy ('eagerfpu')
- * logic, which unconditionally saves/restores all FPU state
- * across context switches. (if FPU state exists.)
- */
- union fpregs_state state;
-
- /*
* @last_cpu:
*
* Records the last CPU on which this context was loaded into
@@ -288,6 +255,43 @@ struct fpu {
* deal with bursty apps that only use the FPU for a short time:
*/
unsigned char counter;
+ /*
+ * @state:
+ *
+ * In-memory copy of all FPU registers that we save/restore
+ * over context switches. If the task is using the FPU then
+ * the registers in the FPU are more recent than this state
+ * copy. If the task context-switches away then they get
+ * saved here and represent the FPU state.
+ *
+ * After context switches there may be a (short) time period
+ * during which the in-FPU hardware registers are unchanged
+ * and still perfectly match this state, if the tasks
+ * scheduled afterwards are not using the FPU.
+ *
+ * This is the 'lazy restore' window of optimization, which
+ * we track though 'fpu_fpregs_owner_ctx' and 'fpu->last_cpu'.
+ *
+ * We detect whether a subsequent task uses the FPU via setting
+ * CR0::TS to 1, which causes any FPU use to raise a #NM fault.
+ *
+ * During this window, if the task gets scheduled again, we
+ * might be able to skip having to do a restore from this
+ * memory buffer to the hardware registers - at the cost of
+ * incurring the overhead of #NM fault traps.
+ *
+ * Note that on modern CPUs that support the XSAVEOPT (or other
+ * optimized XSAVE instructions), we don't use #NM traps anymore,
+ * as the hardware can track whether FPU registers need saving
+ * or not. On such CPUs we activate the non-lazy ('eagerfpu')
+ * logic, which unconditionally saves/restores all FPU state
+ * across context switches. (if FPU state exists.)
+ */
+ union fpregs_state state;
+ /*
+ * WARNING: 'state' is dynamically-sized. Do not put
+ * anything after it here.
+ */
};
#endif /* _ASM_X86_FPU_H */