aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiff
path: root/include/linux/kernel.h
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
authorPaul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com>2011-11-16 23:51:05 -0500
committerPaul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com>2012-03-04 17:54:35 -0500
commit35edd9103c84f2b37f63227d12765c38f30495c5 (patch)
treefd8afa6aee69f6353f7d0d6f927c6c5c2a6ecdd4 /include/linux/kernel.h
parent187f1882b5b0748b3c4c22274663fdb372ac0452 (diff)
downloadlinux-linaro-stable-35edd9103c84f2b37f63227d12765c38f30495c5.tar.gz
bug: consolidate BUILD_BUG_ON with other bug code
The support for BUILD_BUG in linux/kernel.h predates the addition of linux/bug.h -- with this chunk off separate, you can run into situations where a person gets a compile fail even when they've included linux/bug.h, like this: CC lib/string.o lib/string.c: In function 'strlcat': lib/string.c:225:2: error: implicit declaration of function 'BUILD_BUG_ON' make[2]: *** [lib/string.o] Error 1 $ $ grep linux/bug.h lib/string.c #include <linux/bug.h> $ Since the above violates the principle of least surprise, move the BUG chunks from kernel.h to bug.h so it is all together. Signed-off-by: Paul Gortmaker <paul.gortmaker@windriver.com>
Diffstat (limited to 'include/linux/kernel.h')
-rw-r--r--include/linux/kernel.h61
1 files changed, 0 insertions, 61 deletions
diff --git a/include/linux/kernel.h b/include/linux/kernel.h
index e8343422240a..5dba983b8d65 100644
--- a/include/linux/kernel.h
+++ b/include/linux/kernel.h
@@ -662,67 +662,6 @@ static inline void ftrace_dump(enum ftrace_dump_mode oops_dump_mode) { }
const typeof( ((type *)0)->member ) *__mptr = (ptr); \
(type *)( (char *)__mptr - offsetof(type,member) );})
-#ifdef __CHECKER__
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON_NOT_POWER_OF_2(n)
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON_ZERO(e) (0)
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON_NULL(e) ((void*)0)
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON(condition)
-#define BUILD_BUG() (0)
-#else /* __CHECKER__ */
-
-/* Force a compilation error if a constant expression is not a power of 2 */
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON_NOT_POWER_OF_2(n) \
- BUILD_BUG_ON((n) == 0 || (((n) & ((n) - 1)) != 0))
-
-/* Force a compilation error if condition is true, but also produce a
- result (of value 0 and type size_t), so the expression can be used
- e.g. in a structure initializer (or where-ever else comma expressions
- aren't permitted). */
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON_ZERO(e) (sizeof(struct { int:-!!(e); }))
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON_NULL(e) ((void *)sizeof(struct { int:-!!(e); }))
-
-/**
- * BUILD_BUG_ON - break compile if a condition is true.
- * @condition: the condition which the compiler should know is false.
- *
- * If you have some code which relies on certain constants being equal, or
- * other compile-time-evaluated condition, you should use BUILD_BUG_ON to
- * detect if someone changes it.
- *
- * The implementation uses gcc's reluctance to create a negative array, but
- * gcc (as of 4.4) only emits that error for obvious cases (eg. not arguments
- * to inline functions). So as a fallback we use the optimizer; if it can't
- * prove the condition is false, it will cause a link error on the undefined
- * "__build_bug_on_failed". This error message can be harder to track down
- * though, hence the two different methods.
- */
-#ifndef __OPTIMIZE__
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON(condition) ((void)sizeof(char[1 - 2*!!(condition)]))
-#else
-extern int __build_bug_on_failed;
-#define BUILD_BUG_ON(condition) \
- do { \
- ((void)sizeof(char[1 - 2*!!(condition)])); \
- if (condition) __build_bug_on_failed = 1; \
- } while(0)
-#endif
-
-/**
- * BUILD_BUG - break compile if used.
- *
- * If you have some code that you expect the compiler to eliminate at
- * build time, you should use BUILD_BUG to detect if it is
- * unexpectedly used.
- */
-#define BUILD_BUG() \
- do { \
- extern void __build_bug_failed(void) \
- __linktime_error("BUILD_BUG failed"); \
- __build_bug_failed(); \
- } while (0)
-
-#endif /* __CHECKER__ */
-
/* Trap pasters of __FUNCTION__ at compile-time */
#define __FUNCTION__ (__func__)