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authorPekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>2012-01-11 21:11:29 +0200
committerPekka Enberg <penberg@kernel.org>2012-01-11 21:11:29 +0200
commit5878cf431ca7233a56819ca6970153ac0b129599 (patch)
treee5d21d04a0b468d2dabbe3a3824f23b5537fc6a7 /Documentation
parent74ee4ef1f901fbb014bdcdc9171d126490ce2b62 (diff)
parentb13683d1cc14d1dd30b8e20f3ebea3f814ad029f (diff)
downloadlinux-linaro-stable-5878cf431ca7233a56819ca6970153ac0b129599.tar.gz
Merge branch 'slab/urgent' into slab/for-linus
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block13
-rw-r--r--Documentation/DocBook/drm.tmpl308
-rw-r--r--Documentation/DocBook/uio-howto.tmpl7
-rw-r--r--Documentation/blockdev/cciss.txt14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/cgroups/freezer-subsystem.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/devicetree/bindings/vendor-prefixes.txt1
-rw-r--r--Documentation/filesystems/btrfs.txt4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/i2c/ten-bit-addresses36
-rw-r--r--Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt12
-rw-r--r--Documentation/power/devices.txt111
-rw-r--r--Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt40
-rw-r--r--Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt14
-rw-r--r--Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio-Models.txt1
-rw-r--r--Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt8
-rw-r--r--Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/machine.txt6
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/linux-cdc-acm.inf4
17 files changed, 326 insertions, 263 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block
index 2b5d56127fce..c1eb41cb9876 100644
--- a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block
+++ b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-block
@@ -206,16 +206,3 @@ Description:
when a discarded area is read the discard_zeroes_data
parameter will be set to one. Otherwise it will be 0 and
the result of reading a discarded area is undefined.
-What: /sys/block/<disk>/alias
-Date: Aug 2011
-Contact: Nao Nishijima <nao.nishijima.xt@hitachi.com>
-Description:
- A raw device name of a disk does not always point a same disk
- each boot-up time. Therefore, users have to use persistent
- device names, which udev creates when the kernel finds a disk,
- instead of raw device name. However, kernel doesn't show those
- persistent names on its messages (e.g. dmesg).
- This file can store an alias of the disk and it would be
- appeared in kernel messages if it is set. A disk can have an
- alias which length is up to 255bytes. Users can use alphabets,
- numbers, "-" and "_" in alias name. This file is writeonce.
diff --git a/Documentation/DocBook/drm.tmpl b/Documentation/DocBook/drm.tmpl
index c27915893974..196b8b9dba11 100644
--- a/Documentation/DocBook/drm.tmpl
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/drm.tmpl
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@
The Linux DRM layer contains code intended to support the needs
of complex graphics devices, usually containing programmable
pipelines well suited to 3D graphics acceleration. Graphics
- drivers in the kernel can make use of DRM functions to make
+ drivers in the kernel may make use of DRM functions to make
tasks like memory management, interrupt handling and DMA easier,
and provide a uniform interface to applications.
</para>
@@ -57,10 +57,10 @@
existing drivers.
</para>
<para>
- First, we'll go over some typical driver initialization
+ First, we go over some typical driver initialization
requirements, like setting up command buffers, creating an
initial output configuration, and initializing core services.
- Subsequent sections will cover core internals in more detail,
+ Subsequent sections cover core internals in more detail,
providing implementation notes and examples.
</para>
<para>
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@
</para>
<para>
The core of every DRM driver is struct drm_driver. Drivers
- will typically statically initialize a drm_driver structure,
+ typically statically initialize a drm_driver structure,
then pass it to drm_init() at load time.
</para>
@@ -88,8 +88,8 @@
</para>
<programlisting>
static struct drm_driver driver = {
- /* don't use mtrr's here, the Xserver or user space app should
- * deal with them for intel hardware.
+ /* Don't use MTRRs here; the Xserver or userspace app should
+ * deal with them for Intel hardware.
*/
.driver_features =
DRIVER_USE_AGP | DRIVER_REQUIRE_AGP |
@@ -154,8 +154,8 @@
</programlisting>
<para>
In the example above, taken from the i915 DRM driver, the driver
- sets several flags indicating what core features it supports.
- We'll go over the individual callbacks in later sections. Since
+ sets several flags indicating what core features it supports;
+ we go over the individual callbacks in later sections. Since
flags indicate which features your driver supports to the DRM
core, you need to set most of them prior to calling drm_init(). Some,
like DRIVER_MODESET can be set later based on user supplied parameters,
@@ -203,8 +203,8 @@
<term>DRIVER_HAVE_IRQ</term><term>DRIVER_IRQ_SHARED</term>
<listitem>
<para>
- DRIVER_HAVE_IRQ indicates whether the driver has a IRQ
- handler, DRIVER_IRQ_SHARED indicates whether the device &amp;
+ DRIVER_HAVE_IRQ indicates whether the driver has an IRQ
+ handler. DRIVER_IRQ_SHARED indicates whether the device &amp;
handler support shared IRQs (note that this is required of
PCI drivers).
</para>
@@ -214,8 +214,8 @@
<term>DRIVER_DMA_QUEUE</term>
<listitem>
<para>
- If the driver queues DMA requests and completes them
- asynchronously, this flag should be set. Deprecated.
+ Should be set if the driver queues DMA requests and completes them
+ asynchronously. Deprecated.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
@@ -238,7 +238,7 @@
</variablelist>
<para>
In this specific case, the driver requires AGP and supports
- IRQs. DMA, as we'll see, is handled by device specific ioctls
+ IRQs. DMA, as discussed later, is handled by device-specific ioctls
in this case. It also supports the kernel mode setting APIs, though
unlike in the actual i915 driver source, this example unconditionally
exports KMS capability.
@@ -269,36 +269,34 @@
initial output configuration.
</para>
<para>
- Note that the tasks performed at driver load time must not
- conflict with DRM client requirements. For instance, if user
+ If compatibility is a concern (e.g. with drivers converted over
+ to the new interfaces from the old ones), care must be taken to
+ prevent device initialization and control that is incompatible with
+ currently active userspace drivers. For instance, if user
level mode setting drivers are in use, it would be problematic
to perform output discovery &amp; configuration at load time.
- Likewise, if pre-memory management aware user level drivers are
+ Likewise, if user-level drivers unaware of memory management are
in use, memory management and command buffer setup may need to
- be omitted. These requirements are driver specific, and care
+ be omitted. These requirements are driver-specific, and care
needs to be taken to keep both old and new applications and
libraries working. The i915 driver supports the "modeset"
module parameter to control whether advanced features are
- enabled at load time or in legacy fashion. If compatibility is
- a concern (e.g. with drivers converted over to the new interfaces
- from the old ones), care must be taken to prevent incompatible
- device initialization and control with the currently active
- userspace drivers.
+ enabled at load time or in legacy fashion.
</para>
<sect2>
<title>Driver private &amp; performance counters</title>
<para>
The driver private hangs off the main drm_device structure and
- can be used for tracking various device specific bits of
+ can be used for tracking various device-specific bits of
information, like register offsets, command buffer status,
register state for suspend/resume, etc. At load time, a
- driver can simply allocate one and set drm_device.dev_priv
- appropriately; at unload the driver can free it and set
- drm_device.dev_priv to NULL.
+ driver may simply allocate one and set drm_device.dev_priv
+ appropriately; it should be freed and drm_device.dev_priv set
+ to NULL when the driver is unloaded.
</para>
<para>
- The DRM supports several counters which can be used for rough
+ The DRM supports several counters which may be used for rough
performance characterization. Note that the DRM stat counter
system is not often used by applications, and supporting
additional counters is completely optional.
@@ -307,15 +305,15 @@
These interfaces are deprecated and should not be used. If performance
monitoring is desired, the developer should investigate and
potentially enhance the kernel perf and tracing infrastructure to export
- GPU related performance information to performance monitoring
- tools and applications.
+ GPU related performance information for consumption by performance
+ monitoring tools and applications.
</para>
</sect2>
<sect2>
<title>Configuring the device</title>
<para>
- Obviously, device configuration will be device specific.
+ Obviously, device configuration is device-specific.
However, there are several common operations: finding a
device's PCI resources, mapping them, and potentially setting
up an IRQ handler.
@@ -323,10 +321,10 @@
<para>
Finding &amp; mapping resources is fairly straightforward. The
DRM wrapper functions, drm_get_resource_start() and
- drm_get_resource_len() can be used to find BARs on the given
+ drm_get_resource_len(), may be used to find BARs on the given
drm_device struct. Once those values have been retrieved, the
driver load function can call drm_addmap() to create a new
- mapping for the BAR in question. Note you'll probably want a
+ mapping for the BAR in question. Note that you probably want a
drm_local_map_t in your driver private structure to track any
mappings you create.
<!-- !Fdrivers/gpu/drm/drm_bufs.c drm_get_resource_* -->
@@ -335,20 +333,20 @@
<para>
if compatibility with other operating systems isn't a concern
(DRM drivers can run under various BSD variants and OpenSolaris),
- native Linux calls can be used for the above, e.g. pci_resource_*
+ native Linux calls may be used for the above, e.g. pci_resource_*
and iomap*/iounmap. See the Linux device driver book for more
info.
</para>
<para>
- Once you have a register map, you can use the DRM_READn() and
+ Once you have a register map, you may use the DRM_READn() and
DRM_WRITEn() macros to access the registers on your device, or
- use driver specific versions to offset into your MMIO space
- relative to a driver specific base pointer (see I915_READ for
- example).
+ use driver-specific versions to offset into your MMIO space
+ relative to a driver-specific base pointer (see I915_READ for
+ an example).
</para>
<para>
If your device supports interrupt generation, you may want to
- setup an interrupt handler at driver load time as well. This
+ set up an interrupt handler when the driver is loaded. This
is done using the drm_irq_install() function. If your device
supports vertical blank interrupts, it should call
drm_vblank_init() to initialize the core vblank handling code before
@@ -357,7 +355,7 @@
</para>
<!--!Fdrivers/char/drm/drm_irq.c drm_irq_install-->
<para>
- Once your interrupt handler is registered (it'll use your
+ Once your interrupt handler is registered (it uses your
drm_driver.irq_handler as the actual interrupt handling
function), you can safely enable interrupts on your device,
assuming any other state your interrupt handler uses is also
@@ -371,10 +369,10 @@
using the pci_map_rom() call, a convenience function that
takes care of mapping the actual ROM, whether it has been
shadowed into memory (typically at address 0xc0000) or exists
- on the PCI device in the ROM BAR. Note that once you've
- mapped the ROM and extracted any necessary information, be
- sure to unmap it; on many devices the ROM address decoder is
- shared with other BARs, so leaving it mapped can cause
+ on the PCI device in the ROM BAR. Note that after the ROM
+ has been mapped and any necessary information has been extracted,
+ it should be unmapped; on many devices, the ROM address decoder is
+ shared with other BARs, so leaving it mapped could cause
undesired behavior like hangs or memory corruption.
<!--!Fdrivers/pci/rom.c pci_map_rom-->
</para>
@@ -389,9 +387,9 @@
should support a memory manager.
</para>
<para>
- If your driver supports memory management (it should!), you'll
+ If your driver supports memory management (it should!), you
need to set that up at load time as well. How you initialize
- it depends on which memory manager you're using, TTM or GEM.
+ it depends on which memory manager you're using: TTM or GEM.
</para>
<sect3>
<title>TTM initialization</title>
@@ -401,7 +399,7 @@
and devices with dedicated video RAM (VRAM), i.e. most discrete
graphics devices. If your device has dedicated RAM, supporting
TTM is desirable. TTM also integrates tightly with your
- driver specific buffer execution function. See the radeon
+ driver-specific buffer execution function. See the radeon
driver for examples.
</para>
<para>
@@ -429,21 +427,21 @@
created by the memory manager at runtime. Your global TTM should
have a type of TTM_GLOBAL_TTM_MEM. The size field for the global
object should be sizeof(struct ttm_mem_global), and the init and
- release hooks should point at your driver specific init and
- release routines, which will probably eventually call
- ttm_mem_global_init and ttm_mem_global_release respectively.
+ release hooks should point at your driver-specific init and
+ release routines, which probably eventually call
+ ttm_mem_global_init and ttm_mem_global_release, respectively.
</para>
<para>
Once your global TTM accounting structure is set up and initialized
- (done by calling ttm_global_item_ref on the global object you
- just created), you'll need to create a buffer object TTM to
+ by calling ttm_global_item_ref() on it,
+ you need to create a buffer object TTM to
provide a pool for buffer object allocation by clients and the
kernel itself. The type of this object should be TTM_GLOBAL_TTM_BO,
and its size should be sizeof(struct ttm_bo_global). Again,
- driver specific init and release functions can be provided,
- likely eventually calling ttm_bo_global_init and
- ttm_bo_global_release, respectively. Also like the previous
- object, ttm_global_item_ref is used to create an initial reference
+ driver-specific init and release functions may be provided,
+ likely eventually calling ttm_bo_global_init() and
+ ttm_bo_global_release(), respectively. Also, like the previous
+ object, ttm_global_item_ref() is used to create an initial reference
count for the TTM, which will call your initialization function.
</para>
</sect3>
@@ -453,27 +451,26 @@
GEM is an alternative to TTM, designed specifically for UMA
devices. It has simpler initialization and execution requirements
than TTM, but has no VRAM management capability. Core GEM
- initialization is comprised of a basic drm_mm_init call to create
+ is initialized by calling drm_mm_init() to create
a GTT DRM MM object, which provides an address space pool for
- object allocation. In a KMS configuration, the driver will
- need to allocate and initialize a command ring buffer following
- basic GEM initialization. Most UMA devices have a so-called
+ object allocation. In a KMS configuration, the driver
+ needs to allocate and initialize a command ring buffer following
+ core GEM initialization. A UMA device usually has what is called a
"stolen" memory region, which provides space for the initial
framebuffer and large, contiguous memory regions required by the
- device. This space is not typically managed by GEM, and must
+ device. This space is not typically managed by GEM, and it must
be initialized separately into its own DRM MM object.
</para>
<para>
- Initialization will be driver specific, and will depend on
- the architecture of the device. In the case of Intel
+ Initialization is driver-specific. In the case of Intel
integrated graphics chips like 965GM, GEM initialization can
be done by calling the internal GEM init function,
i915_gem_do_init(). Since the 965GM is a UMA device
- (i.e. it doesn't have dedicated VRAM), GEM will manage
+ (i.e. it doesn't have dedicated VRAM), GEM manages
making regular RAM available for GPU operations. Memory set
aside by the BIOS (called "stolen" memory by the i915
- driver) will be managed by the DRM memrange allocator; the
- rest of the aperture will be managed by GEM.
+ driver) is managed by the DRM memrange allocator; the
+ rest of the aperture is managed by GEM.
<programlisting>
/* Basic memrange allocator for stolen space (aka vram) */
drm_memrange_init(&amp;dev_priv->vram, 0, prealloc_size);
@@ -483,7 +480,7 @@
<!--!Edrivers/char/drm/drm_memrange.c-->
</para>
<para>
- Once the memory manager has been set up, we can allocate the
+ Once the memory manager has been set up, we may allocate the
command buffer. In the i915 case, this is also done with a
GEM function, i915_gem_init_ringbuffer().
</para>
@@ -493,16 +490,25 @@
<sect2>
<title>Output configuration</title>
<para>
- The final initialization task is output configuration. This involves
- finding and initializing the CRTCs, encoders and connectors
- for your device, creating an initial configuration and
- registering a framebuffer console driver.
+ The final initialization task is output configuration. This involves:
+ <itemizedlist>
+ <listitem>
+ Finding and initializing the CRTCs, encoders, and connectors
+ for the device.
+ </listitem>
+ <listitem>
+ Creating an initial configuration.
+ </listitem>
+ <listitem>
+ Registering a framebuffer console driver.
+ </listitem>
+ </itemizedlist>
</para>
<sect3>
<title>Output discovery and initialization</title>
<para>
- Several core functions exist to create CRTCs, encoders and
- connectors, namely drm_crtc_init(), drm_connector_init() and
+ Several core functions exist to create CRTCs, encoders, and
+ connectors, namely: drm_crtc_init(), drm_connector_init(), and
drm_encoder_init(), along with several "helper" functions to
perform common tasks.
</para>
@@ -555,10 +561,10 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
</programlisting>
<para>
In the example above (again, taken from the i915 driver), a
- CRT connector and encoder combination is created. A device
- specific i2c bus is also created, for fetching EDID data and
+ CRT connector and encoder combination is created. A device-specific
+ i2c bus is also created for fetching EDID data and
performing monitor detection. Once the process is complete,
- the new connector is registered with sysfs, to make its
+ the new connector is registered with sysfs to make its
properties available to applications.
</para>
<sect4>
@@ -567,12 +573,12 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
Since many PC-class graphics devices have similar display output
designs, the DRM provides a set of helper functions to make
output management easier. The core helper routines handle
- encoder re-routing and disabling of unused functions following
- mode set. Using the helpers is optional, but recommended for
+ encoder re-routing and the disabling of unused functions following
+ mode setting. Using the helpers is optional, but recommended for
devices with PC-style architectures (i.e. a set of display planes
for feeding pixels to encoders which are in turn routed to
connectors). Devices with more complex requirements needing
- finer grained management can opt to use the core callbacks
+ finer grained management may opt to use the core callbacks
directly.
</para>
<para>
@@ -580,17 +586,25 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
</para>
</sect4>
<para>
- For each encoder, CRTC and connector, several functions must
- be provided, depending on the object type. Encoder objects
- need to provide a DPMS (basically on/off) function, mode fixup
- (for converting requested modes into native hardware timings),
- and prepare, set and commit functions for use by the core DRM
- helper functions. Connector helpers need to provide mode fetch and
- validity functions as well as an encoder matching function for
- returning an ideal encoder for a given connector. The core
- connector functions include a DPMS callback, (deprecated)
- save/restore routines, detection, mode probing, property handling,
- and cleanup functions.
+ Each encoder object needs to provide:
+ <itemizedlist>
+ <listitem>
+ A DPMS (basically on/off) function.
+ </listitem>
+ <listitem>
+ A mode-fixup function (for converting requested modes into
+ native hardware timings).
+ </listitem>
+ <listitem>
+ Functions (prepare, set, and commit) for use by the core DRM
+ helper functions.
+ </listitem>
+ </itemizedlist>
+ Connector helpers need to provide functions (mode-fetch, validity,
+ and encoder-matching) for returning an ideal encoder for a given
+ connector. The core connector functions include a DPMS callback,
+ save/restore routines (deprecated), detection, mode probing,
+ property handling, and cleanup functions.
</para>
<!--!Edrivers/char/drm/drm_crtc.h-->
<!--!Edrivers/char/drm/drm_crtc.c-->
@@ -605,23 +619,34 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
<title>VBlank event handling</title>
<para>
The DRM core exposes two vertical blank related ioctls:
- DRM_IOCTL_WAIT_VBLANK and DRM_IOCTL_MODESET_CTL.
+ <variablelist>
+ <varlistentry>
+ <term>DRM_IOCTL_WAIT_VBLANK</term>
+ <listitem>
+ <para>
+ This takes a struct drm_wait_vblank structure as its argument,
+ and it is used to block or request a signal when a specified
+ vblank event occurs.
+ </para>
+ </listitem>
+ </varlistentry>
+ <varlistentry>
+ <term>DRM_IOCTL_MODESET_CTL</term>
+ <listitem>
+ <para>
+ This should be called by application level drivers before and
+ after mode setting, since on many devices the vertical blank
+ counter is reset at that time. Internally, the DRM snapshots
+ the last vblank count when the ioctl is called with the
+ _DRM_PRE_MODESET command, so that the counter won't go backwards
+ (which is dealt with when _DRM_POST_MODESET is used).
+ </para>
+ </listitem>
+ </varlistentry>
+ </variablelist>
<!--!Edrivers/char/drm/drm_irq.c-->
</para>
<para>
- DRM_IOCTL_WAIT_VBLANK takes a struct drm_wait_vblank structure
- as its argument, and is used to block or request a signal when a
- specified vblank event occurs.
- </para>
- <para>
- DRM_IOCTL_MODESET_CTL should be called by application level
- drivers before and after mode setting, since on many devices the
- vertical blank counter will be reset at that time. Internally,
- the DRM snapshots the last vblank count when the ioctl is called
- with the _DRM_PRE_MODESET command so that the counter won't go
- backwards (which is dealt with when _DRM_POST_MODESET is used).
- </para>
- <para>
To support the functions above, the DRM core provides several
helper functions for tracking vertical blank counters, and
requires drivers to provide several callbacks:
@@ -632,24 +657,24 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
register. The enable and disable vblank callbacks should enable
and disable vertical blank interrupts, respectively. In the
absence of DRM clients waiting on vblank events, the core DRM
- code will use the disable_vblank() function to disable
- interrupts, which saves power. They'll be re-enabled again when
+ code uses the disable_vblank() function to disable
+ interrupts, which saves power. They are re-enabled again when
a client calls the vblank wait ioctl above.
</para>
<para>
- Devices that don't provide a count register can simply use an
+ A device that doesn't provide a count register may simply use an
internal atomic counter incremented on every vertical blank
- interrupt, and can make their enable and disable vblank
- functions into no-ops.
+ interrupt (and then treat the enable_vblank() and disable_vblank()
+ callbacks as no-ops).
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1>
<title>Memory management</title>
<para>
- The memory manager lies at the heart of many DRM operations, and
- is also required to support advanced client features like OpenGL
- pbuffers. The DRM currently contains two memory managers, TTM
+ The memory manager lies at the heart of many DRM operations; it
+ is required to support advanced client features like OpenGL
+ pbuffers. The DRM currently contains two memory managers: TTM
and GEM.
</para>
@@ -679,41 +704,46 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
<para>
GEM-enabled drivers must provide gem_init_object() and
gem_free_object() callbacks to support the core memory
- allocation routines. They should also provide several driver
- specific ioctls to support command execution, pinning, buffer
+ allocation routines. They should also provide several driver-specific
+ ioctls to support command execution, pinning, buffer
read &amp; write, mapping, and domain ownership transfers.
</para>
<para>
- On a fundamental level, GEM involves several operations: memory
- allocation and freeing, command execution, and aperture management
- at command execution time. Buffer object allocation is relatively
+ On a fundamental level, GEM involves several operations:
+ <itemizedlist>
+ <listitem>Memory allocation and freeing</listitem>
+ <listitem>Command execution</listitem>
+ <listitem>Aperture management at command execution time</listitem>
+ </itemizedlist>
+ Buffer object allocation is relatively
straightforward and largely provided by Linux's shmem layer, which
provides memory to back each object. When mapped into the GTT
or used in a command buffer, the backing pages for an object are
flushed to memory and marked write combined so as to be coherent
- with the GPU. Likewise, when the GPU finishes rendering to an object,
- if the CPU accesses it, it must be made coherent with the CPU's view
+ with the GPU. Likewise, if the CPU accesses an object after the GPU
+ has finished rendering to the object, then the object must be made
+ coherent with the CPU's view
of memory, usually involving GPU cache flushing of various kinds.
- This core CPU&lt;-&gt;GPU coherency management is provided by the GEM
- set domain function, which evaluates an object's current domain and
+ This core CPU&lt;-&gt;GPU coherency management is provided by a
+ device-specific ioctl, which evaluates an object's current domain and
performs any necessary flushing or synchronization to put the object
into the desired coherency domain (note that the object may be busy,
- i.e. an active render target; in that case the set domain function
- will block the client and wait for rendering to complete before
+ i.e. an active render target; in that case, setting the domain
+ blocks the client and waits for rendering to complete before
performing any necessary flushing operations).
</para>
<para>
Perhaps the most important GEM function is providing a command
execution interface to clients. Client programs construct command
- buffers containing references to previously allocated memory objects
- and submit them to GEM. At that point, GEM will take care to bind
+ buffers containing references to previously allocated memory objects,
+ and then submit them to GEM. At that point, GEM takes care to bind
all the objects into the GTT, execute the buffer, and provide
necessary synchronization between clients accessing the same buffers.
This often involves evicting some objects from the GTT and re-binding
others (a fairly expensive operation), and providing relocation
support which hides fixed GTT offsets from clients. Clients must
take care not to submit command buffers that reference more objects
- than can fit in the GTT or GEM will reject them and no rendering
+ than can fit in the GTT; otherwise, GEM will reject them and no rendering
will occur. Similarly, if several objects in the buffer require
fence registers to be allocated for correct rendering (e.g. 2D blits
on pre-965 chips), care must be taken not to require more fence
@@ -729,7 +759,7 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
<title>Output management</title>
<para>
At the core of the DRM output management code is a set of
- structures representing CRTCs, encoders and connectors.
+ structures representing CRTCs, encoders, and connectors.
</para>
<para>
A CRTC is an abstraction representing a part of the chip that
@@ -765,21 +795,19 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
<sect1>
<title>Framebuffer management</title>
<para>
- In order to set a mode on a given CRTC, encoder and connector
- configuration, clients need to provide a framebuffer object which
- will provide a source of pixels for the CRTC to deliver to the encoder(s)
- and ultimately the connector(s) in the configuration. A framebuffer
- is fundamentally a driver specific memory object, made into an opaque
- handle by the DRM addfb function. Once an fb has been created this
- way it can be passed to the KMS mode setting routines for use in
- a configuration.
+ Clients need to provide a framebuffer object which provides a source
+ of pixels for a CRTC to deliver to the encoder(s) and ultimately the
+ connector(s). A framebuffer is fundamentally a driver-specific memory
+ object, made into an opaque handle by the DRM's addfb() function.
+ Once a framebuffer has been created this way, it may be passed to the
+ KMS mode setting routines for use in a completed configuration.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1>
<title>Command submission &amp; fencing</title>
<para>
- This should cover a few device specific command submission
+ This should cover a few device-specific command submission
implementations.
</para>
</sect1>
@@ -789,7 +817,7 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
<para>
The DRM core provides some suspend/resume code, but drivers
wanting full suspend/resume support should provide save() and
- restore() functions. These will be called at suspend,
+ restore() functions. These are called at suspend,
hibernate, or resume time, and should perform any state save or
restore required by your device across suspend or hibernate
states.
@@ -812,8 +840,8 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
<para>
The DRM core exports several interfaces to applications,
generally intended to be used through corresponding libdrm
- wrapper functions. In addition, drivers export device specific
- interfaces for use by userspace drivers &amp; device aware
+ wrapper functions. In addition, drivers export device-specific
+ interfaces for use by userspace drivers &amp; device-aware
applications through ioctls and sysfs files.
</para>
<para>
@@ -822,8 +850,8 @@ void intel_crt_init(struct drm_device *dev)
management, memory management, and output management.
</para>
<para>
- Cover generic ioctls and sysfs layout here. Only need high
- level info, since man pages will cover the rest.
+ Cover generic ioctls and sysfs layout here. We only need high-level
+ info, since man pages should cover the rest.
</para>
</chapter>
diff --git a/Documentation/DocBook/uio-howto.tmpl b/Documentation/DocBook/uio-howto.tmpl
index 54883de5d5f9..ac3d0018140c 100644
--- a/Documentation/DocBook/uio-howto.tmpl
+++ b/Documentation/DocBook/uio-howto.tmpl
@@ -521,6 +521,11 @@ Here's a description of the fields of <varname>struct uio_mem</varname>:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>
+<varname>const char *name</varname>: Optional. Set this to help identify
+the memory region, it will show up in the corresponding sysfs node.
+</para></listitem>
+
+<listitem><para>
<varname>int memtype</varname>: Required if the mapping is used. Set this to
<varname>UIO_MEM_PHYS</varname> if you you have physical memory on your
card to be mapped. Use <varname>UIO_MEM_LOGICAL</varname> for logical
@@ -553,7 +558,7 @@ instead to remember such an address.
</itemizedlist>
<para>
-Please do not touch the <varname>kobj</varname> element of
+Please do not touch the <varname>map</varname> element of
<varname>struct uio_mem</varname>! It is used by the UIO framework
to set up sysfs files for this mapping. Simply leave it alone.
</para>
diff --git a/Documentation/blockdev/cciss.txt b/Documentation/blockdev/cciss.txt
index 71464e09ec18..b79d0a13e7cd 100644
--- a/Documentation/blockdev/cciss.txt
+++ b/Documentation/blockdev/cciss.txt
@@ -98,14 +98,12 @@ You must enable "SCSI tape drive support for Smart Array 5xxx" and
"SCSI support" in your kernel configuration to be able to use SCSI
tape drives with your Smart Array 5xxx controller.
-Additionally, note that the driver will not engage the SCSI core at init
-time. The driver must be directed to dynamically engage the SCSI core via
-the /proc filesystem entry which the "block" side of the driver creates as
-/proc/driver/cciss/cciss* at runtime. This is because at driver init time,
-the SCSI core may not yet be initialized (because the driver is a block
-driver) and attempting to register it with the SCSI core in such a case
-would cause a hang. This is best done via an initialization script
-(typically in /etc/init.d, but could vary depending on distribution).
+Additionally, note that the driver will engage the SCSI core at init
+time if any tape drives or medium changers are detected. The driver may
+also be directed to dynamically engage the SCSI core via the /proc filesystem
+entry which the "block" side of the driver creates as
+/proc/driver/cciss/cciss* at runtime. This is best done via a script.
+
For example:
for x in /proc/driver/cciss/cciss[0-9]*
diff --git a/Documentation/cgroups/freezer-subsystem.txt b/Documentation/cgroups/freezer-subsystem.txt
index c21d77742a07..7e62de1e59ff 100644
--- a/Documentation/cgroups/freezer-subsystem.txt
+++ b/Documentation/cgroups/freezer-subsystem.txt
@@ -33,9 +33,9 @@ demonstrate this problem using nested bash shells:
From a second, unrelated bash shell:
$ kill -SIGSTOP 16690
- $ kill -SIGCONT 16990
+ $ kill -SIGCONT 16690
- <at this point 16990 exits and causes 16644 to exit too>
+ <at this point 16690 exits and causes 16644 to exit too>
This happens because bash can observe both signals and choose how it
responds to them.
diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/vendor-prefixes.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/vendor-prefixes.txt
index e8552782b440..874921e97802 100644
--- a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/vendor-prefixes.txt
+++ b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/vendor-prefixes.txt
@@ -33,6 +33,7 @@ qcom Qualcomm, Inc.
ramtron Ramtron International
samsung Samsung Semiconductor
schindler Schindler
+sil Silicon Image
simtek
sirf SiRF Technology, Inc.
stericsson ST-Ericsson
diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/btrfs.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/btrfs.txt
index 64087c34327f..7671352216f1 100644
--- a/Documentation/filesystems/btrfs.txt
+++ b/Documentation/filesystems/btrfs.txt
@@ -63,8 +63,8 @@ IRC network.
Userspace tools for creating and manipulating Btrfs file systems are
available from the git repository at the following location:
- http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/mason/btrfs-progs-unstable.git
- git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mason/btrfs-progs-unstable.git
+ http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/mason/btrfs-progs.git
+ git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/mason/btrfs-progs.git
These include the following tools:
diff --git a/Documentation/i2c/ten-bit-addresses b/Documentation/i2c/ten-bit-addresses
index e9890709c508..cdfe13901b99 100644
--- a/Documentation/i2c/ten-bit-addresses
+++ b/Documentation/i2c/ten-bit-addresses
@@ -1,22 +1,24 @@
The I2C protocol knows about two kinds of device addresses: normal 7 bit
addresses, and an extended set of 10 bit addresses. The sets of addresses
do not intersect: the 7 bit address 0x10 is not the same as the 10 bit
-address 0x10 (though a single device could respond to both of them). You
-select a 10 bit address by adding an extra byte after the address
-byte:
- S Addr7 Rd/Wr ....
-becomes
- S 11110 Addr10 Rd/Wr
-S is the start bit, Rd/Wr the read/write bit, and if you count the number
-of bits, you will see the there are 8 after the S bit for 7 bit addresses,
-and 16 after the S bit for 10 bit addresses.
+address 0x10 (though a single device could respond to both of them).
-WARNING! The current 10 bit address support is EXPERIMENTAL. There are
-several places in the code that will cause SEVERE PROBLEMS with 10 bit
-addresses, even though there is some basic handling and hooks. Also,
-almost no supported adapter handles the 10 bit addresses correctly.
+I2C messages to and from 10-bit address devices have a different format.
+See the I2C specification for the details.
-As soon as a real 10 bit address device is spotted 'in the wild', we
-can and will add proper support. Right now, 10 bit address devices
-are defined by the I2C protocol, but we have never seen a single device
-which supports them.
+The current 10 bit address support is minimal. It should work, however
+you can expect some problems along the way:
+* Not all bus drivers support 10-bit addresses. Some don't because the
+ hardware doesn't support them (SMBus doesn't require 10-bit address
+ support for example), some don't because nobody bothered adding the
+ code (or it's there but not working properly.) Software implementation
+ (i2c-algo-bit) is known to work.
+* Some optional features do not support 10-bit addresses. This is the
+ case of automatic detection and instantiation of devices by their,
+ drivers, for example.
+* Many user-space packages (for example i2c-tools) lack support for
+ 10-bit addresses.
+
+Note that 10-bit address devices are still pretty rare, so the limitations
+listed above could stay for a long time, maybe even forever if nobody
+needs them to be fixed.
diff --git a/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt b/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
index b21093eabef1..1aefc79031a4 100644
--- a/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
+++ b/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
@@ -315,12 +315,12 @@ bytes respectively. Such letter suffixes can also be entirely omitted.
CPU-intensive style benchmark, and it can vary highly in
a microbenchmark depending on workload and compiler.
- 1: only for 32-bit processes
- 2: only for 64-bit processes
+ 32: only for 32-bit processes
+ 64: only for 64-bit processes
on: enable for both 32- and 64-bit processes
off: disable for both 32- and 64-bit processes
- amd_iommu= [HW,X86-84]
+ amd_iommu= [HW,X86-64]
Pass parameters to the AMD IOMMU driver in the system.
Possible values are:
fullflush - enable flushing of IO/TLB entries when
diff --git a/Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt b/Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt
index cb7f3148035d..589f2da5d545 100644
--- a/Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt
+++ b/Documentation/networking/ip-sysctl.txt
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ ip_no_pmtu_disc - BOOLEAN
default FALSE
min_pmtu - INTEGER
- default 562 - minimum discovered Path MTU
+ default 552 - minimum discovered Path MTU
route/max_size - INTEGER
Maximum number of routes allowed in the kernel. Increase
@@ -282,11 +282,11 @@ tcp_max_ssthresh - INTEGER
Default: 0 (off)
tcp_max_syn_backlog - INTEGER
- Maximal number of remembered connection requests, which are
- still did not receive an acknowledgment from connecting client.
- Default value is 1024 for systems with more than 128Mb of memory,
- and 128 for low memory machines. If server suffers of overload,
- try to increase this number.
+ Maximal number of remembered connection requests, which have not
+ received an acknowledgment from connecting client.
+ The minimal value is 128 for low memory machines, and it will
+ increase in proportion to the memory of machine.
+ If server suffers from overload, try increasing this number.
tcp_max_tw_buckets - INTEGER
Maximal number of timewait sockets held by system simultaneously.
diff --git a/Documentation/power/devices.txt b/Documentation/power/devices.txt
index 646a89e0c07d..3139fb505dce 100644
--- a/Documentation/power/devices.txt
+++ b/Documentation/power/devices.txt
@@ -123,9 +123,10 @@ please refer directly to the source code for more information about it.
Subsystem-Level Methods
-----------------------
The core methods to suspend and resume devices reside in struct dev_pm_ops
-pointed to by the pm member of struct bus_type, struct device_type and
-struct class. They are mostly of interest to the people writing infrastructure
-for buses, like PCI or USB, or device type and device class drivers.
+pointed to by the ops member of struct dev_pm_domain, or by the pm member of
+struct bus_type, struct device_type and struct class. They are mostly of
+interest to the people writing infrastructure for platforms and buses, like PCI
+or USB, or device type and device class drivers.
Bus drivers implement these methods as appropriate for the hardware and the
drivers using it; PCI works differently from USB, and so on. Not many people
@@ -139,41 +140,57 @@ sequencing in the driver model tree.
/sys/devices/.../power/wakeup files
-----------------------------------
-All devices in the driver model have two flags to control handling of wakeup
-events (hardware signals that can force the device and/or system out of a low
-power state). These flags are initialized by bus or device driver code using
+All device objects in the driver model contain fields that control the handling
+of system wakeup events (hardware signals that can force the system out of a
+sleep state). These fields are initialized by bus or device driver code using
device_set_wakeup_capable() and device_set_wakeup_enable(), defined in
include/linux/pm_wakeup.h.
-The "can_wakeup" flag just records whether the device (and its driver) can
+The "power.can_wakeup" flag just records whether the device (and its driver) can
physically support wakeup events. The device_set_wakeup_capable() routine
-affects this flag. The "should_wakeup" flag controls whether the device should
-try to use its wakeup mechanism. device_set_wakeup_enable() affects this flag;
-for the most part drivers should not change its value. The initial value of
-should_wakeup is supposed to be false for the majority of devices; the major
-exceptions are power buttons, keyboards, and Ethernet adapters whose WoL
-(wake-on-LAN) feature has been set up with ethtool. It should also default
-to true for devices that don't generate wakeup requests on their own but merely
-forward wakeup requests from one bus to another (like PCI bridges).
+affects this flag. The "power.wakeup" field is a pointer to an object of type
+struct wakeup_source used for controlling whether or not the device should use
+its system wakeup mechanism and for notifying the PM core of system wakeup
+events signaled by the device. This object is only present for wakeup-capable
+devices (i.e. devices whose "can_wakeup" flags are set) and is created (or
+removed) by device_set_wakeup_capable().
Whether or not a device is capable of issuing wakeup events is a hardware
matter, and the kernel is responsible for keeping track of it. By contrast,
whether or not a wakeup-capable device should issue wakeup events is a policy
decision, and it is managed by user space through a sysfs attribute: the
-power/wakeup file. User space can write the strings "enabled" or "disabled" to
-set or clear the "should_wakeup" flag, respectively. This file is only present
-for wakeup-capable devices (i.e. devices whose "can_wakeup" flags are set)
-and is created (or removed) by device_set_wakeup_capable(). Reads from the
-file will return the corresponding string.
-
-The device_may_wakeup() routine returns true only if both flags are set.
+"power/wakeup" file. User space can write the strings "enabled" or "disabled"
+to it to indicate whether or not, respectively, the device is supposed to signal
+system wakeup. This file is only present if the "power.wakeup" object exists
+for the given device and is created (or removed) along with that object, by
+device_set_wakeup_capable(). Reads from the file will return the corresponding
+string.
+
+The "power/wakeup" file is supposed to contain the "disabled" string initially
+for the majority of devices; the major exceptions are power buttons, keyboards,
+and Ethernet adapters whose WoL (wake-on-LAN) feature has been set up with
+ethtool. It should also default to "enabled" for devices that don't generate
+wakeup requests on their own but merely forward wakeup requests from one bus to
+another (like PCI Express ports).
+
+The device_may_wakeup() routine returns true only if the "power.wakeup" object
+exists and the corresponding "power/wakeup" file contains the string "enabled".
This information is used by subsystems, like the PCI bus type code, to see
whether or not to enable the devices' wakeup mechanisms. If device wakeup
mechanisms are enabled or disabled directly by drivers, they also should use
device_may_wakeup() to decide what to do during a system sleep transition.
-However for runtime power management, wakeup events should be enabled whenever
-the device and driver both support them, regardless of the should_wakeup flag.
-
+Device drivers, however, are not supposed to call device_set_wakeup_enable()
+directly in any case.
+
+It ought to be noted that system wakeup is conceptually different from "remote
+wakeup" used by runtime power management, although it may be supported by the
+same physical mechanism. Remote wakeup is a feature allowing devices in
+low-power states to trigger specific interrupts to signal conditions in which
+they should be put into the full-power state. Those interrupts may or may not
+be used to signal system wakeup events, depending on the hardware design. On
+some systems it is impossible to trigger them from system sleep states. In any
+case, remote wakeup should always be enabled for runtime power management for
+all devices and drivers that support it.
/sys/devices/.../power/control files
------------------------------------
@@ -249,20 +266,31 @@ for every device before the next phase begins. Not all busses or classes
support all these callbacks and not all drivers use all the callbacks. The
various phases always run after tasks have been frozen and before they are
unfrozen. Furthermore, the *_noirq phases run at a time when IRQ handlers have
-been disabled (except for those marked with the IRQ_WAKEUP flag).
-
-All phases use bus, type, or class callbacks (that is, methods defined in
-dev->bus->pm, dev->type->pm, or dev->class->pm). These callbacks are mutually
-exclusive, so if the device type provides a struct dev_pm_ops object pointed to
-by its pm field (i.e. both dev->type and dev->type->pm are defined), the
-callbacks included in that object (i.e. dev->type->pm) will be used. Otherwise,
-if the class provides a struct dev_pm_ops object pointed to by its pm field
-(i.e. both dev->class and dev->class->pm are defined), the PM core will use the
-callbacks from that object (i.e. dev->class->pm). Finally, if the pm fields of
-both the device type and class objects are NULL (or those objects do not exist),
-the callbacks provided by the bus (that is, the callbacks from dev->bus->pm)
-will be used (this allows device types to override callbacks provided by bus
-types or classes if necessary).
+been disabled (except for those marked with the IRQF_NO_SUSPEND flag).
+
+All phases use PM domain, bus, type, or class callbacks (that is, methods
+defined in dev->pm_domain->ops, dev->bus->pm, dev->type->pm, or dev->class->pm).
+These callbacks are regarded by the PM core as mutually exclusive. Moreover,
+PM domain callbacks always take precedence over bus, type and class callbacks,
+while type callbacks take precedence over bus and class callbacks, and class
+callbacks take precedence over bus callbacks. To be precise, the following
+rules are used to determine which callback to execute in the given phase:
+
+ 1. If dev->pm_domain is present, the PM core will attempt to execute the
+ callback included in dev->pm_domain->ops. If that callback is not
+ present, no action will be carried out for the given device.
+
+ 2. Otherwise, if both dev->type and dev->type->pm are present, the callback
+ included in dev->type->pm will be executed.
+
+ 3. Otherwise, if both dev->class and dev->class->pm are present, the
+ callback included in dev->class->pm will be executed.
+
+ 4. Otherwise, if both dev->bus and dev->bus->pm are present, the callback
+ included in dev->bus->pm will be executed.
+
+This allows PM domains and device types to override callbacks provided by bus
+types or device classes if necessary.
These callbacks may in turn invoke device- or driver-specific methods stored in
dev->driver->pm, but they don't have to.
@@ -283,9 +311,8 @@ When the system goes into the standby or memory sleep state, the phases are:
After the prepare callback method returns, no new children may be
registered below the device. The method may also prepare the device or
- driver in some way for the upcoming system power transition (for
- example, by allocating additional memory required for this purpose), but
- it should not put the device into a low-power state.
+ driver in some way for the upcoming system power transition, but it
+ should not put the device into a low-power state.
2. The suspend methods should quiesce the device to stop it from performing
I/O. They also may save the device registers and put it into the
diff --git a/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt b/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt
index 5336149f831b..c2ae8bf77d46 100644
--- a/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt
+++ b/Documentation/power/runtime_pm.txt
@@ -44,25 +44,33 @@ struct dev_pm_ops {
};
The ->runtime_suspend(), ->runtime_resume() and ->runtime_idle() callbacks
-are executed by the PM core for either the power domain, or the device type
-(if the device power domain's struct dev_pm_ops does not exist), or the class
-(if the device power domain's and type's struct dev_pm_ops object does not
-exist), or the bus type (if the device power domain's, type's and class'
-struct dev_pm_ops objects do not exist) of the given device, so the priority
-order of callbacks from high to low is that power domain callbacks, device
-type callbacks, class callbacks and bus type callbacks, and the high priority
-one will take precedence over low priority one. The bus type, device type and
-class callbacks are referred to as subsystem-level callbacks in what follows,
-and generally speaking, the power domain callbacks are used for representing
-power domains within a SoC.
+are executed by the PM core for the device's subsystem that may be either of
+the following:
+
+ 1. PM domain of the device, if the device's PM domain object, dev->pm_domain,
+ is present.
+
+ 2. Device type of the device, if both dev->type and dev->type->pm are present.
+
+ 3. Device class of the device, if both dev->class and dev->class->pm are
+ present.
+
+ 4. Bus type of the device, if both dev->bus and dev->bus->pm are present.
+
+The PM core always checks which callback to use in the order given above, so the
+priority order of callbacks from high to low is: PM domain, device type, class
+and bus type. Moreover, the high-priority one will always take precedence over
+a low-priority one. The PM domain, bus type, device type and class callbacks
+are referred to as subsystem-level callbacks in what follows.
By default, the callbacks are always invoked in process context with interrupts
enabled. However, subsystems can use the pm_runtime_irq_safe() helper function
-to tell the PM core that a device's ->runtime_suspend() and ->runtime_resume()
-callbacks should be invoked in atomic context with interrupts disabled.
-This implies that these callback routines must not block or sleep, but it also
-means that the synchronous helper functions listed at the end of Section 4 can
-be used within an interrupt handler or in an atomic context.
+to tell the PM core that their ->runtime_suspend(), ->runtime_resume() and
+->runtime_idle() callbacks may be invoked in atomic context with interrupts
+disabled for a given device. This implies that the callback routines in
+question must not block or sleep, but it also means that the synchronous helper
+functions listed at the end of Section 4 may be used for that device within an
+interrupt handler or generally in an atomic context.
The subsystem-level suspend callback is _entirely_ _responsible_ for handling
the suspend of the device as appropriate, which may, but need not include
diff --git a/Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt b/Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt
index 079cb3df62cf..41c8378c0b2f 100644
--- a/Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt
+++ b/Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt
@@ -97,15 +97,23 @@
struct serial_rs485 rs485conf;
- /* Set RS485 mode: */
+ /* Enable RS485 mode: */
rs485conf.flags |= SER_RS485_ENABLED;
+ /* Set logical level for RTS pin equal to 1 when sending: */
+ rs485conf.flags |= SER_RS485_RTS_ON_SEND;
+ /* or, set logical level for RTS pin equal to 0 when sending: */
+ rs485conf.flags &= ~(SER_RS485_RTS_ON_SEND);
+
+ /* Set logical level for RTS pin equal to 1 after sending: */
+ rs485conf.flags |= SER_RS485_RTS_AFTER_SEND;
+ /* or, set logical level for RTS pin equal to 0 after sending: */
+ rs485conf.flags &= ~(SER_RS485_RTS_AFTER_SEND);
+
/* Set rts delay before send, if needed: */
- rs485conf.flags |= SER_RS485_RTS_BEFORE_SEND;
rs485conf.delay_rts_before_send = ...;
/* Set rts delay after send, if needed: */
- rs485conf.flags |= SER_RS485_RTS_AFTER_SEND;
rs485conf.delay_rts_after_send = ...;
/* Set this flag if you want to receive data even whilst sending data */
diff --git a/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio-Models.txt b/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio-Models.txt
index 4f3443230d89..edad99abec21 100644
--- a/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio-Models.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio-Models.txt
@@ -349,6 +349,7 @@ STAC92HD83*
ref Reference board
mic-ref Reference board with power management for ports
dell-s14 Dell laptop
+ dell-vostro-3500 Dell Vostro 3500 laptop
hp HP laptops with (inverted) mute-LED
hp-dv7-4000 HP dv-7 4000
auto BIOS setup (default)
diff --git a/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt b/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt
index 03e2771ddeef..91fee3b45fb8 100644
--- a/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sound/alsa/HD-Audio.txt
@@ -579,7 +579,7 @@ Development Tree
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The latest development codes for HD-audio are found on sound git tree:
-- git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tiwai/sound-2.6.git
+- git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tiwai/sound.git
The master branch or for-next branches can be used as the main
development branches in general while the HD-audio specific patches
@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ is, installed via the usual spells: configure, make and make
install(-modules). See INSTALL in the package. The snapshot tarballs
are found at:
-- ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/tiwai/snapshot/
+- ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/people/tiwai/snapshot/
Sending a Bug Report
@@ -696,7 +696,7 @@ via hda-verb won't change the mixer value.
The hda-verb program is found in the ftp directory:
-- ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/tiwai/misc/
+- ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/people/tiwai/misc/
Also a git repository is available:
@@ -764,7 +764,7 @@ operation, the jack plugging simulation, etc.
The package is found in:
-- ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/tiwai/misc/
+- ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/people/tiwai/misc/
A git repository is available:
diff --git a/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/machine.txt b/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/machine.txt
index 3e2ec9cbf397..d50c14df3411 100644
--- a/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/machine.txt
+++ b/Documentation/sound/alsa/soc/machine.txt
@@ -50,8 +50,7 @@ Machine DAI Configuration
The machine DAI configuration glues all the codec and CPU DAIs together. It can
also be used to set up the DAI system clock and for any machine related DAI
initialisation e.g. the machine audio map can be connected to the codec audio
-map, unconnected codec pins can be set as such. Please see corgi.c, spitz.c
-for examples.
+map, unconnected codec pins can be set as such.
struct snd_soc_dai_link is used to set up each DAI in your machine. e.g.
@@ -83,8 +82,7 @@ Machine Power Map
The machine driver can optionally extend the codec power map and to become an
audio power map of the audio subsystem. This allows for automatic power up/down
of speaker/HP amplifiers, etc. Codec pins can be connected to the machines jack
-sockets in the machine init function. See soc/pxa/spitz.c and dapm.txt for
-details.
+sockets in the machine init function.
Machine Controls
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/linux-cdc-acm.inf b/Documentation/usb/linux-cdc-acm.inf
index 37a02ce54841..f0ffc27d4c0a 100644
--- a/Documentation/usb/linux-cdc-acm.inf
+++ b/Documentation/usb/linux-cdc-acm.inf
@@ -90,10 +90,10 @@ ServiceBinary=%12%\USBSER.sys
[SourceDisksFiles]
[SourceDisksNames]
[DeviceList]
-%DESCRIPTION%=DriverInstall, USB\VID_0525&PID_A4A7, USB\VID_1D6B&PID_0104&MI_02
+%DESCRIPTION%=DriverInstall, USB\VID_0525&PID_A4A7, USB\VID_1D6B&PID_0104&MI_02, USB\VID_1D6B&PID_0106&MI_00
[DeviceList.NTamd64]
-%DESCRIPTION%=DriverInstall, USB\VID_0525&PID_A4A7, USB\VID_1D6B&PID_0104&MI_02
+%DESCRIPTION%=DriverInstall, USB\VID_0525&PID_A4A7, USB\VID_1D6B&PID_0104&MI_02, USB\VID_1D6B&PID_0106&MI_00
;------------------------------------------------------------------------------