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2008-12-20SELinux: don't check permissions for kernel mountsJames Morris
Don't bother checking permissions when the kernel performs an internal mount, as this should always be allowed. Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov>
2008-12-20security: pass mount flags to security_sb_kern_mount()James Morris
Pass mount flags to security_sb_kern_mount(), so security modules can determine if a mount operation is being performed by the kernel. Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov>
2008-12-20SELinux: correctly detect proc filesystems of the form "proc/foo"Stephen Smalley
Map all of these proc/ filesystem types to "proc" for the policy lookup at filesystem mount time. Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Allow kernel services to override LSM settings for task actionsDavid Howells
Allow kernel services to override LSM settings appropriate to the actions performed by a task by duplicating a set of credentials, modifying it and then using task_struct::cred to point to it when performing operations on behalf of a task. This is used, for example, by CacheFiles which has to transparently access the cache on behalf of a process that thinks it is doing, say, NFS accesses with a potentially inappropriate (with respect to accessing the cache) set of credentials. This patch provides two LSM hooks for modifying a task security record: (*) security_kernel_act_as() which allows modification of the security datum with which a task acts on other objects (most notably files). (*) security_kernel_create_files_as() which allows modification of the security datum that is used to initialise the security data on a file that a task creates. The patch also provides four new credentials handling functions, which wrap the LSM functions: (1) prepare_kernel_cred() Prepare a set of credentials for a kernel service to use, based either on a daemon's credentials or on init_cred. All the keyrings are cleared. (2) set_security_override() Set the LSM security ID in a set of credentials to a specific security context, assuming permission from the LSM policy. (3) set_security_override_from_ctx() As (2), but takes the security context as a string. (4) set_create_files_as() Set the file creation LSM security ID in a set of credentials to be the same as that on a particular inode. Signed-off-by: Casey Schaufler <casey@schaufler-ca.com> [Smack changes] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Add a kernel_service object class to SELinuxDavid Howells
Add a 'kernel_service' object class to SELinux and give this object class two access vectors: 'use_as_override' and 'create_files_as'. The first vector is used to grant a process the right to nominate an alternate process security ID for the kernel to use as an override for the SELinux subjective security when accessing stuff on behalf of another process. For example, CacheFiles when accessing the cache on behalf on a process accessing an NFS file needs to use a subjective security ID appropriate to the cache rather then the one the calling process is using. The cachefilesd daemon will nominate the security ID to be used. The second vector is used to grant a process the right to nominate a file creation label for a kernel service to use. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Differentiate objective and effective subjective credentials on a taskDavid Howells
Differentiate the objective and real subjective credentials from the effective subjective credentials on a task by introducing a second credentials pointer into the task_struct. task_struct::real_cred then refers to the objective and apparent real subjective credentials of a task, as perceived by the other tasks in the system. task_struct::cred then refers to the effective subjective credentials of a task, as used by that task when it's actually running. These are not visible to the other tasks in the system. __task_cred(task) then refers to the objective/real credentials of the task in question. current_cred() refers to the effective subjective credentials of the current task. prepare_creds() uses the objective creds as a base and commit_creds() changes both pointers in the task_struct (indeed commit_creds() requires them to be the same). override_creds() and revert_creds() change the subjective creds pointer only, and the former returns the old subjective creds. These are used by NFSD, faccessat() and do_coredump(), and will by used by CacheFiles. In SELinux, current_has_perm() is provided as an alternative to task_has_perm(). This uses the effective subjective context of current, whereas task_has_perm() uses the objective/real context of the subject. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Make execve() take advantage of copy-on-write credentialsDavid Howells
Make execve() take advantage of copy-on-write credentials, allowing it to set up the credentials in advance, and then commit the whole lot after the point of no return. This patch and the preceding patches have been tested with the LTP SELinux testsuite. This patch makes several logical sets of alteration: (1) execve(). The credential bits from struct linux_binprm are, for the most part, replaced with a single credentials pointer (bprm->cred). This means that all the creds can be calculated in advance and then applied at the point of no return with no possibility of failure. I would like to replace bprm->cap_effective with: cap_isclear(bprm->cap_effective) but this seems impossible due to special behaviour for processes of pid 1 (they always retain their parent's capability masks where normally they'd be changed - see cap_bprm_set_creds()). The following sequence of events now happens: (a) At the start of do_execve, the current task's cred_exec_mutex is locked to prevent PTRACE_ATTACH from obsoleting the calculation of creds that we make. (a) prepare_exec_creds() is then called to make a copy of the current task's credentials and prepare it. This copy is then assigned to bprm->cred. This renders security_bprm_alloc() and security_bprm_free() unnecessary, and so they've been removed. (b) The determination of unsafe execution is now performed immediately after (a) rather than later on in the code. The result is stored in bprm->unsafe for future reference. (c) prepare_binprm() is called, possibly multiple times. (i) This applies the result of set[ug]id binaries to the new creds attached to bprm->cred. Personality bit clearance is recorded, but now deferred on the basis that the exec procedure may yet fail. (ii) This then calls the new security_bprm_set_creds(). This should calculate the new LSM and capability credentials into *bprm->cred. This folds together security_bprm_set() and parts of security_bprm_apply_creds() (these two have been removed). Anything that might fail must be done at this point. (iii) bprm->cred_prepared is set to 1. bprm->cred_prepared is 0 on the first pass of the security calculations, and 1 on all subsequent passes. This allows SELinux in (ii) to base its calculations only on the initial script and not on the interpreter. (d) flush_old_exec() is called to commit the task to execution. This performs the following steps with regard to credentials: (i) Clear pdeath_signal and set dumpable on certain circumstances that may not be covered by commit_creds(). (ii) Clear any bits in current->personality that were deferred from (c.i). (e) install_exec_creds() [compute_creds() as was] is called to install the new credentials. This performs the following steps with regard to credentials: (i) Calls security_bprm_committing_creds() to apply any security requirements, such as flushing unauthorised files in SELinux, that must be done before the credentials are changed. This is made up of bits of security_bprm_apply_creds() and security_bprm_post_apply_creds(), both of which have been removed. This function is not allowed to fail; anything that might fail must have been done in (c.ii). (ii) Calls commit_creds() to apply the new credentials in a single assignment (more or less). Possibly pdeath_signal and dumpable should be part of struct creds. (iii) Unlocks the task's cred_replace_mutex, thus allowing PTRACE_ATTACH to take place. (iv) Clears The bprm->cred pointer as the credentials it was holding are now immutable. (v) Calls security_bprm_committed_creds() to apply any security alterations that must be done after the creds have been changed. SELinux uses this to flush signals and signal handlers. (f) If an error occurs before (d.i), bprm_free() will call abort_creds() to destroy the proposed new credentials and will then unlock cred_replace_mutex. No changes to the credentials will have been made. (2) LSM interface. A number of functions have been changed, added or removed: (*) security_bprm_alloc(), ->bprm_alloc_security() (*) security_bprm_free(), ->bprm_free_security() Removed in favour of preparing new credentials and modifying those. (*) security_bprm_apply_creds(), ->bprm_apply_creds() (*) security_bprm_post_apply_creds(), ->bprm_post_apply_creds() Removed; split between security_bprm_set_creds(), security_bprm_committing_creds() and security_bprm_committed_creds(). (*) security_bprm_set(), ->bprm_set_security() Removed; folded into security_bprm_set_creds(). (*) security_bprm_set_creds(), ->bprm_set_creds() New. The new credentials in bprm->creds should be checked and set up as appropriate. bprm->cred_prepared is 0 on the first call, 1 on the second and subsequent calls. (*) security_bprm_committing_creds(), ->bprm_committing_creds() (*) security_bprm_committed_creds(), ->bprm_committed_creds() New. Apply the security effects of the new credentials. This includes closing unauthorised files in SELinux. This function may not fail. When the former is called, the creds haven't yet been applied to the process; when the latter is called, they have. The former may access bprm->cred, the latter may not. (3) SELinux. SELinux has a number of changes, in addition to those to support the LSM interface changes mentioned above: (a) The bprm_security_struct struct has been removed in favour of using the credentials-under-construction approach. (c) flush_unauthorized_files() now takes a cred pointer and passes it on to inode_has_perm(), file_has_perm() and dentry_open(). Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Inaugurate COW credentialsDavid Howells
Inaugurate copy-on-write credentials management. This uses RCU to manage the credentials pointer in the task_struct with respect to accesses by other tasks. A process may only modify its own credentials, and so does not need locking to access or modify its own credentials. A mutex (cred_replace_mutex) is added to the task_struct to control the effect of PTRACE_ATTACHED on credential calculations, particularly with respect to execve(). With this patch, the contents of an active credentials struct may not be changed directly; rather a new set of credentials must be prepared, modified and committed using something like the following sequence of events: struct cred *new = prepare_creds(); int ret = blah(new); if (ret < 0) { abort_creds(new); return ret; } return commit_creds(new); There are some exceptions to this rule: the keyrings pointed to by the active credentials may be instantiated - keyrings violate the COW rule as managing COW keyrings is tricky, given that it is possible for a task to directly alter the keys in a keyring in use by another task. To help enforce this, various pointers to sets of credentials, such as those in the task_struct, are declared const. The purpose of this is compile-time discouragement of altering credentials through those pointers. Once a set of credentials has been made public through one of these pointers, it may not be modified, except under special circumstances: (1) Its reference count may incremented and decremented. (2) The keyrings to which it points may be modified, but not replaced. The only safe way to modify anything else is to create a replacement and commit using the functions described in Documentation/credentials.txt (which will be added by a later patch). This patch and the preceding patches have been tested with the LTP SELinux testsuite. This patch makes several logical sets of alteration: (1) execve(). This now prepares and commits credentials in various places in the security code rather than altering the current creds directly. (2) Temporary credential overrides. do_coredump() and sys_faccessat() now prepare their own credentials and temporarily override the ones currently on the acting thread, whilst preventing interference from other threads by holding cred_replace_mutex on the thread being dumped. This will be replaced in a future patch by something that hands down the credentials directly to the functions being called, rather than altering the task's objective credentials. (3) LSM interface. A number of functions have been changed, added or removed: (*) security_capset_check(), ->capset_check() (*) security_capset_set(), ->capset_set() Removed in favour of security_capset(). (*) security_capset(), ->capset() New. This is passed a pointer to the new creds, a pointer to the old creds and the proposed capability sets. It should fill in the new creds or return an error. All pointers, barring the pointer to the new creds, are now const. (*) security_bprm_apply_creds(), ->bprm_apply_creds() Changed; now returns a value, which will cause the process to be killed if it's an error. (*) security_task_alloc(), ->task_alloc_security() Removed in favour of security_prepare_creds(). (*) security_cred_free(), ->cred_free() New. Free security data attached to cred->security. (*) security_prepare_creds(), ->cred_prepare() New. Duplicate any security data attached to cred->security. (*) security_commit_creds(), ->cred_commit() New. Apply any security effects for the upcoming installation of new security by commit_creds(). (*) security_task_post_setuid(), ->task_post_setuid() Removed in favour of security_task_fix_setuid(). (*) security_task_fix_setuid(), ->task_fix_setuid() Fix up the proposed new credentials for setuid(). This is used by cap_set_fix_setuid() to implicitly adjust capabilities in line with setuid() changes. Changes are made to the new credentials, rather than the task itself as in security_task_post_setuid(). (*) security_task_reparent_to_init(), ->task_reparent_to_init() Removed. Instead the task being reparented to init is referred directly to init's credentials. NOTE! This results in the loss of some state: SELinux's osid no longer records the sid of the thread that forked it. (*) security_key_alloc(), ->key_alloc() (*) security_key_permission(), ->key_permission() Changed. These now take cred pointers rather than task pointers to refer to the security context. (4) sys_capset(). This has been simplified and uses less locking. The LSM functions it calls have been merged. (5) reparent_to_kthreadd(). This gives the current thread the same credentials as init by simply using commit_thread() to point that way. (6) __sigqueue_alloc() and switch_uid() __sigqueue_alloc() can't stop the target task from changing its creds beneath it, so this function gets a reference to the currently applicable user_struct which it then passes into the sigqueue struct it returns if successful. switch_uid() is now called from commit_creds(), and possibly should be folded into that. commit_creds() should take care of protecting __sigqueue_alloc(). (7) [sg]et[ug]id() and co and [sg]et_current_groups. The set functions now all use prepare_creds(), commit_creds() and abort_creds() to build and check a new set of credentials before applying it. security_task_set[ug]id() is called inside the prepared section. This guarantees that nothing else will affect the creds until we've finished. The calling of set_dumpable() has been moved into commit_creds(). Much of the functionality of set_user() has been moved into commit_creds(). The get functions all simply access the data directly. (8) security_task_prctl() and cap_task_prctl(). security_task_prctl() has been modified to return -ENOSYS if it doesn't want to handle a function, or otherwise return the return value directly rather than through an argument. Additionally, cap_task_prctl() now prepares a new set of credentials, even if it doesn't end up using it. (9) Keyrings. A number of changes have been made to the keyrings code: (a) switch_uid_keyring(), copy_keys(), exit_keys() and suid_keys() have all been dropped and built in to the credentials functions directly. They may want separating out again later. (b) key_alloc() and search_process_keyrings() now take a cred pointer rather than a task pointer to specify the security context. (c) copy_creds() gives a new thread within the same thread group a new thread keyring if its parent had one, otherwise it discards the thread keyring. (d) The authorisation key now points directly to the credentials to extend the search into rather pointing to the task that carries them. (e) Installing thread, process or session keyrings causes a new set of credentials to be created, even though it's not strictly necessary for process or session keyrings (they're shared). (10) Usermode helper. The usermode helper code now carries a cred struct pointer in its subprocess_info struct instead of a new session keyring pointer. This set of credentials is derived from init_cred and installed on the new process after it has been cloned. call_usermodehelper_setup() allocates the new credentials and call_usermodehelper_freeinfo() discards them if they haven't been used. A special cred function (prepare_usermodeinfo_creds()) is provided specifically for call_usermodehelper_setup() to call. call_usermodehelper_setkeys() adjusts the credentials to sport the supplied keyring as the new session keyring. (11) SELinux. SELinux has a number of changes, in addition to those to support the LSM interface changes mentioned above: (a) selinux_setprocattr() no longer does its check for whether the current ptracer can access processes with the new SID inside the lock that covers getting the ptracer's SID. Whilst this lock ensures that the check is done with the ptracer pinned, the result is only valid until the lock is released, so there's no point doing it inside the lock. (12) is_single_threaded(). This function has been extracted from selinux_setprocattr() and put into a file of its own in the lib/ directory as join_session_keyring() now wants to use it too. The code in SELinux just checked to see whether a task shared mm_structs with other tasks (CLONE_VM), but that isn't good enough. We really want to know if they're part of the same thread group (CLONE_THREAD). (13) nfsd. The NFS server daemon now has to use the COW credentials to set the credentials it is going to use. It really needs to pass the credentials down to the functions it calls, but it can't do that until other patches in this series have been applied. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Pass credentials through dentry_open()David Howells
Pass credentials through dentry_open() so that the COW creds patch can have SELinux's flush_unauthorized_files() pass the appropriate creds back to itself when it opens its null chardev. The security_dentry_open() call also now takes a creds pointer, as does the dentry_open hook in struct security_operations. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Make inode_has_perm() and file_has_perm() take a cred pointerDavid Howells
Make inode_has_perm() and file_has_perm() take a cred pointer rather than a task pointer. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Wrap access to SELinux's task SIDDavid Howells
Wrap access to SELinux's task SID, using task_sid() and current_sid() as appropriate. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Use RCU to access another task's creds and to release a task's own credsDavid Howells
Use RCU to access another task's creds and to release a task's own creds. This means that it will be possible for the credentials of a task to be replaced without another task (a) requiring a full lock to read them, and (b) seeing deallocated memory. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Wrap current->cred and a few other accessorsDavid Howells
Wrap current->cred and a few other accessors to hide their actual implementation. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Detach the credentials from task_structDavid Howells
Detach the credentials from task_struct, duplicating them in copy_process() and releasing them in __put_task_struct(). Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Separate task security context from task_structDavid Howells
Separate the task security context from task_struct. At this point, the security data is temporarily embedded in the task_struct with two pointers pointing to it. Note that the Alpha arch is altered as it refers to (E)UID and (E)GID in entry.S via asm-offsets. With comment fixes Signed-off-by: Marc Dionne <marc.c.dionne@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Constify the kernel_cap_t arguments to the capset LSM hooksDavid Howells
Constify the kernel_cap_t arguments to the capset LSM hooks. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-14CRED: Neuter sys_capset()David Howells
Take away the ability for sys_capset() to affect processes other than current. This means that current will not need to lock its own credentials when reading them against interference by other processes. This has effectively been the case for a while anyway, since: (1) Without LSM enabled, sys_capset() is disallowed. (2) With file-based capabilities, sys_capset() is neutered. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: Andrew G. Morgan <morgan@kernel.org> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-11Currently SELinux jumps through some ugly hoops to not audit a capbilityEric Paris
check when determining if a process has additional powers to override memory limits or when trying to read/write illegal file labels. Use the new noaudit call instead. Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-11Add a new capable interface that will be used by systems that use audit toEric Paris
make an A or B type decision instead of a security decision. Currently this is the case at least for filesystems when deciding if a process can use the reserved 'root' blocks and for the case of things like the oom algorithm determining if processes are root processes and should be less likely to be killed. These types of security system requests should not be audited or logged since they are not really security decisions. It would be possible to solve this problem like the vm_enough_memory security check did by creating a new LSM interface and moving all of the policy into that interface but proves the needlessly bloat the LSM and provide complex indirection. This merely allows those decisions to be made where they belong and to not flood logs or printk with denials for thing that are not security decisions. Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-09SELinux: Use unknown perm handling to handle unknown netlink msg typesEric Paris
Currently when SELinux has not been updated to handle a netlink message type the operation is denied with EINVAL. This patch will leave the audit/warning message so things get fixed but if policy chose to allow unknowns this will allow the netlink operation. Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-06Merge branch 'master' into nextJames Morris
2008-11-06selinux: recognize netlink messages for 'ip addrlabel'Michal Schmidt
In enforcing mode '/sbin/ip addrlabel' results in a SELinux error: type=SELINUX_ERR msg=audit(1225698822.073:42): SELinux: unrecognized netlink message type=74 for sclass=43 The problem is missing RTM_*ADDRLABEL entries in SELinux's netlink message types table. Reported in https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=469423 Signed-off-by: Michal Schmidt <mschmidt@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-05SELinux: hold tasklist_lock and siglock while waking wait_chldexitEric Paris
SELinux has long been calling wake_up_interruptible() on current->parent->signal->wait_chldexit without holding any locks. It appears that this operation should hold the tasklist_lock to dereference current->parent and we should hold the siglock when waking up the signal->wait_chldexit. Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-11-01SELinux: properly handle empty tty_files listEric Paris
SELinux has wrongly (since 2004) had an incorrect test for an empty tty->tty_files list. With an empty list selinux would be pointing to part of the tty struct itself and would then proceed to dereference that value and again dereference that result. An F10 change to plymouth on a ppc64 system is actually currently triggering this bug. This patch uses list_empty() to handle empty lists rather than looking at a meaningless location. [note, this fixes the oops reported in https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=469079] Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-31SELinux: check open perms in dentry_open not inode_permissionEric Paris
Some operations, like searching a directory path or connecting a unix domain socket, make explicit calls into inode_permission. Our choices are to either try to come up with a signature for all of the explicit calls to inode_permission and do not check open on those, or to move the open checks to dentry_open where we know this is always an open operation. This patch moves the checks to dentry_open. Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-20Merge branches 'timers/clocksource', 'timers/hrtimers', 'timers/nohz', ↵Thomas Gleixner
'timers/ntp', 'timers/posixtimers' and 'timers/debug' into v28-timers-for-linus
2008-10-13vfs: Use const for kernel parser tableSteven Whitehouse
This is a much better version of a previous patch to make the parser tables constant. Rather than changing the typedef, we put the "const" in all the various places where its required, allowing the __initconst exception for nfsroot which was the cause of the previous trouble. This was posted for review some time ago and I believe its been in -mm since then. Signed-off-by: Steven Whitehouse <swhiteho@redhat.com> Cc: Alexander Viro <aviro@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2008-10-13Merge branch 'for-linus' of ↵Linus Torvalds
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jmorris/security-testing-2.6 * 'for-linus' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/jmorris/security-testing-2.6: (24 commits) integrity: special fs magic As pointed out by Jonathan Corbet, the timer must be deleted before ERROR: code indent should use tabs where possible The tpm_dev_release function is only called for platform devices, not pnp Protect tpm_chip_list when transversing it. Renames num_open to is_open, as only one process can open the file at a time. Remove the BKL calls from the TPM driver, which were added in the overall netlabel: Add configuration support for local labeling cipso: Add support for native local labeling and fixup mapping names netlabel: Changes to the NetLabel security attributes to allow LSMs to pass full contexts selinux: Cache NetLabel secattrs in the socket's security struct selinux: Set socket NetLabel based on connection endpoint netlabel: Add functionality to set the security attributes of a packet netlabel: Add network address selectors to the NetLabel/LSM domain mapping netlabel: Add a generic way to create ordered linked lists of network addrs netlabel: Replace protocol/NetLabel linking with refrerence counts smack: Fix missing calls to netlbl_skbuff_err() selinux: Fix missing calls to netlbl_skbuff_err() selinux: Fix a problem in security_netlbl_sid_to_secattr() selinux: Better local/forward check in selinux_ip_postroute() ...
2008-10-13tty: Redo current tty lockingAlan Cox
Currently it is sometimes locked by the tty mutex and sometimes by the sighand lock. The latter is in fact correct and now we can hand back referenced objects we can fix this up without problems around sleeping functions. Signed-off-by: Alan Cox <alan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2008-10-13tty: Make get_current_tty use a krefAlan Cox
We now return a kref covered tty reference. That ensures the tty structure doesn't go away when you have a return from get_current_tty. This is not enough to protect you from most of the resources being freed behind your back - yet. [Updated to include fixes for SELinux problems found by Andrew Morton and an s390 leak found while debugging the former] Signed-off-by: Alan Cox <alan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
2008-10-11Merge branch 'master' of ↵James Morris
git://git.infradead.org/users/pcmoore/lblnet-2.6_next into next
2008-10-10netlabel: Changes to the NetLabel security attributes to allow LSMs to pass ↵Paul Moore
full contexts This patch provides support for including the LSM's secid in addition to the LSM's MLS information in the NetLabel security attributes structure. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Cache NetLabel secattrs in the socket's security structPaul Moore
Previous work enabled the use of address based NetLabel selectors, which while highly useful, brought the potential for additional per-packet overhead when used. This patch attempts to mitigate some of that overhead by caching the NetLabel security attribute struct within the SELinux socket security structure. This should help eliminate the need to recreate the NetLabel secattr structure for each packet resulting in less overhead. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Set socket NetLabel based on connection endpointPaul Moore
Previous work enabled the use of address based NetLabel selectors, which while highly useful, brought the potential for additional per-packet overhead when used. This patch attempts to solve that by applying NetLabel socket labels when sockets are connect()'d. This should alleviate the per-packet NetLabel labeling for all connected sockets (yes, it even works for connected DGRAM sockets). Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Reviewed-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10netlabel: Add functionality to set the security attributes of a packetPaul Moore
This patch builds upon the new NetLabel address selector functionality by providing the NetLabel KAPI and CIPSO engine support needed to enable the new packet-based labeling. The only new addition to the NetLabel KAPI at this point is shown below: * int netlbl_skbuff_setattr(skb, family, secattr) ... and is designed to be called from a Netfilter hook after the packet's IP header has been populated such as in the FORWARD or LOCAL_OUT hooks. This patch also provides the necessary SELinux hooks to support this new functionality. Smack support is not currently included due to uncertainty regarding the permissions needed to expand the Smack network access controls. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Reviewed-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Fix missing calls to netlbl_skbuff_err()Paul Moore
At some point I think I messed up and dropped the calls to netlbl_skbuff_err() which are necessary for CIPSO to send error notifications to remote systems. This patch re-introduces the error handling calls into the SELinux code. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Fix a problem in security_netlbl_sid_to_secattr()Paul Moore
Currently when SELinux fails to allocate memory in security_netlbl_sid_to_secattr() the NetLabel LSM domain field is set to NULL which triggers the default NetLabel LSM domain mapping which may not always be the desired mapping. This patch fixes this by returning an error when the kernel is unable to allocate memory. This could result in more failures on a system with heavy memory pressure but it is the "correct" thing to do. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Better local/forward check in selinux_ip_postroute()Paul Moore
It turns out that checking to see if skb->sk is NULL is not a very good indicator of a forwarded packet as some locally generated packets also have skb->sk set to NULL. Fix this by not only checking the skb->sk field but also the IP[6]CB(skb)->flags field for the IP[6]SKB_FORWARDED flag. While we are at it, we are calling selinux_parse_skb() much earlier than we really should resulting in potentially wasted cycles parsing packets for information we might no use; so shuffle the code around a bit to fix this. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Correctly handle IPv4 packets on IPv6 sockets in all casesPaul Moore
We did the right thing in a few cases but there were several areas where we determined a packet's address family based on the socket's address family which is not the right thing to do since we can get IPv4 packets on IPv6 sockets. This patch fixes these problems by either taking the address family directly from the packet. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-10selinux: Cleanup the NetLabel glue codePaul Moore
We were doing a lot of extra work in selinux_netlbl_sock_graft() what wasn't necessary so this patch removes that code. It also removes the redundant second argument to selinux_netlbl_sock_setsid() which allows us to simplify a few other functions. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-04selinux: Fix an uninitialized variable BUG/panic in selinux_secattr_to_sid()Paul Moore
At some point during the 2.6.27 development cycle two new fields were added to the SELinux context structure, a string pointer and a length field. The code in selinux_secattr_to_sid() was not modified and as a result these two fields were left uninitialized which could result in erratic behavior, including kernel panics, when NetLabel is used. This patch fixes the problem by fully initializing the context in selinux_secattr_to_sid() before use and reducing the level of direct context manipulation done to help prevent future problems. Please apply this to the 2.6.27-rcX release stream. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-10-04selinux: Fix an uninitialized variable BUG/panic in selinux_secattr_to_sid()Paul Moore
At some point during the 2.6.27 development cycle two new fields were added to the SELinux context structure, a string pointer and a length field. The code in selinux_secattr_to_sid() was not modified and as a result these two fields were left uninitialized which could result in erratic behavior, including kernel panics, when NetLabel is used. This patch fixes the problem by fully initializing the context in selinux_secattr_to_sid() before use and reducing the level of direct context manipulation done to help prevent future problems. Please apply this to the 2.6.27-rcX release stream. Signed-off-by: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-09-30selinux: use default proc sid on symlinksStephen Smalley
As we are not concerned with fine-grained control over reading of symlinks in proc, always use the default proc SID for all proc symlinks. This should help avoid permission issues upon changes to the proc tree as in the /proc/net -> /proc/self/net example. This does not alter labeling of symlinks within /proc/pid directories. ls -Zd /proc/net output before and after the patch should show the difference. Signed-off-by: Stephen D. Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-09-21Merge branch 'master' into nextJames Morris
Conflicts: MAINTAINERS Thanks for breaking my tree :-) Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-09-14timers: fix itimer/many thread hangFrank Mayhar
Overview This patch reworks the handling of POSIX CPU timers, including the ITIMER_PROF, ITIMER_VIRT timers and rlimit handling. It was put together with the help of Roland McGrath, the owner and original writer of this code. The problem we ran into, and the reason for this rework, has to do with using a profiling timer in a process with a large number of threads. It appears that the performance of the old implementation of run_posix_cpu_timers() was at least O(n*3) (where "n" is the number of threads in a process) or worse. Everything is fine with an increasing number of threads until the time taken for that routine to run becomes the same as or greater than the tick time, at which point things degrade rather quickly. This patch fixes bug 9906, "Weird hang with NPTL and SIGPROF." Code Changes This rework corrects the implementation of run_posix_cpu_timers() to make it run in constant time for a particular machine. (Performance may vary between one machine and another depending upon whether the kernel is built as single- or multiprocessor and, in the latter case, depending upon the number of running processors.) To do this, at each tick we now update fields in signal_struct as well as task_struct. The run_posix_cpu_timers() function uses those fields to make its decisions. We define a new structure, "task_cputime," to contain user, system and scheduler times and use these in appropriate places: struct task_cputime { cputime_t utime; cputime_t stime; unsigned long long sum_exec_runtime; }; This is included in the structure "thread_group_cputime," which is a new substructure of signal_struct and which varies for uniprocessor versus multiprocessor kernels. For uniprocessor kernels, it uses "task_cputime" as a simple substructure, while for multiprocessor kernels it is a pointer: struct thread_group_cputime { struct task_cputime totals; }; struct thread_group_cputime { struct task_cputime *totals; }; We also add a new task_cputime substructure directly to signal_struct, to cache the earliest expiration of process-wide timers, and task_cputime also replaces the it_*_expires fields of task_struct (used for earliest expiration of thread timers). The "thread_group_cputime" structure contains process-wide timers that are updated via account_user_time() and friends. In the non-SMP case the structure is a simple aggregator; unfortunately in the SMP case that simplicity was not achievable due to cache-line contention between CPUs (in one measured case performance was actually _worse_ on a 16-cpu system than the same test on a 4-cpu system, due to this contention). For SMP, the thread_group_cputime counters are maintained as a per-cpu structure allocated using alloc_percpu(). The timer functions update only the timer field in the structure corresponding to the running CPU, obtained using per_cpu_ptr(). We define a set of inline functions in sched.h that we use to maintain the thread_group_cputime structure and hide the differences between UP and SMP implementations from the rest of the kernel. The thread_group_cputime_init() function initializes the thread_group_cputime structure for the given task. The thread_group_cputime_alloc() is a no-op for UP; for SMP it calls the out-of-line function thread_group_cputime_alloc_smp() to allocate and fill in the per-cpu structures and fields. The thread_group_cputime_free() function, also a no-op for UP, in SMP frees the per-cpu structures. The thread_group_cputime_clone_thread() function (also a UP no-op) for SMP calls thread_group_cputime_alloc() if the per-cpu structures haven't yet been allocated. The thread_group_cputime() function fills the task_cputime structure it is passed with the contents of the thread_group_cputime fields; in UP it's that simple but in SMP it must also safely check that tsk->signal is non-NULL (if it is it just uses the appropriate fields of task_struct) and, if so, sums the per-cpu values for each online CPU. Finally, the three functions account_group_user_time(), account_group_system_time() and account_group_exec_runtime() are used by timer functions to update the respective fields of the thread_group_cputime structure. Non-SMP operation is trivial and will not be mentioned further. The per-cpu structure is always allocated when a task creates its first new thread, via a call to thread_group_cputime_clone_thread() from copy_signal(). It is freed at process exit via a call to thread_group_cputime_free() from cleanup_signal(). All functions that formerly summed utime/stime/sum_sched_runtime values from from all threads in the thread group now use thread_group_cputime() to snapshot the values in the thread_group_cputime structure or the values in the task structure itself if the per-cpu structure hasn't been allocated. Finally, the code in kernel/posix-cpu-timers.c has changed quite a bit. The run_posix_cpu_timers() function has been split into a fast path and a slow path; the former safely checks whether there are any expired thread timers and, if not, just returns, while the slow path does the heavy lifting. With the dedicated thread group fields, timers are no longer "rebalanced" and the process_timer_rebalance() function and related code has gone away. All summing loops are gone and all code that used them now uses the thread_group_cputime() inline. When process-wide timers are set, the new task_cputime structure in signal_struct is used to cache the earliest expiration; this is checked in the fast path. Performance The fix appears not to add significant overhead to existing operations. It generally performs the same as the current code except in two cases, one in which it performs slightly worse (Case 5 below) and one in which it performs very significantly better (Case 2 below). Overall it's a wash except in those two cases. I've since done somewhat more involved testing on a dual-core Opteron system. Case 1: With no itimer running, for a test with 100,000 threads, the fixed kernel took 1428.5 seconds, 513 seconds more than the unfixed system, all of which was spent in the system. There were twice as many voluntary context switches with the fix as without it. Case 2: With an itimer running at .01 second ticks and 4000 threads (the most an unmodified kernel can handle), the fixed kernel ran the test in eight percent of the time (5.8 seconds as opposed to 70 seconds) and had better tick accuracy (.012 seconds per tick as opposed to .023 seconds per tick). Case 3: A 4000-thread test with an initial timer tick of .01 second and an interval of 10,000 seconds (i.e. a timer that ticks only once) had very nearly the same performance in both cases: 6.3 seconds elapsed for the fixed kernel versus 5.5 seconds for the unfixed kernel. With fewer threads (eight in these tests), the Case 1 test ran in essentially the same time on both the modified and unmodified kernels (5.2 seconds versus 5.8 seconds). The Case 2 test ran in about the same time as well, 5.9 seconds versus 5.4 seconds but again with much better tick accuracy, .013 seconds per tick versus .025 seconds per tick for the unmodified kernel. Since the fix affected the rlimit code, I also tested soft and hard CPU limits. Case 4: With a hard CPU limit of 20 seconds and eight threads (and an itimer running), the modified kernel was very slightly favored in that while it killed the process in 19.997 seconds of CPU time (5.002 seconds of wall time), only .003 seconds of that was system time, the rest was user time. The unmodified kernel killed the process in 20.001 seconds of CPU (5.014 seconds of wall time) of which .016 seconds was system time. Really, though, the results were too close to call. The results were essentially the same with no itimer running. Case 5: With a soft limit of 20 seconds and a hard limit of 2000 seconds (where the hard limit would never be reached) and an itimer running, the modified kernel exhibited worse tick accuracy than the unmodified kernel: .050 seconds/tick versus .028 seconds/tick. Otherwise, performance was almost indistinguishable. With no itimer running this test exhibited virtually identical behavior and times in both cases. In times past I did some limited performance testing. those results are below. On a four-cpu Opteron system without this fix, a sixteen-thread test executed in 3569.991 seconds, of which user was 3568.435s and system was 1.556s. On the same system with the fix, user and elapsed time were about the same, but system time dropped to 0.007 seconds. Performance with eight, four and one thread were comparable. Interestingly, the timer ticks with the fix seemed more accurate: The sixteen-thread test with the fix received 149543 ticks for 0.024 seconds per tick, while the same test without the fix received 58720 for 0.061 seconds per tick. Both cases were configured for an interval of 0.01 seconds. Again, the other tests were comparable. Each thread in this test computed the primes up to 25,000,000. I also did a test with a large number of threads, 100,000 threads, which is impossible without the fix. In this case each thread computed the primes only up to 10,000 (to make the runtime manageable). System time dominated, at 1546.968 seconds out of a total 2176.906 seconds (giving a user time of 629.938s). It received 147651 ticks for 0.015 seconds per tick, still quite accurate. There is obviously no comparable test without the fix. Signed-off-by: Frank Mayhar <fmayhar@google.com> Cc: Roland McGrath <roland@redhat.com> Cc: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu>
2008-09-12Update selinux info in MAINTAINERS and Kconfig help textStephen Smalley
Update the SELinux entry in MAINTAINERS and drop the obsolete information from the selinux Kconfig help text. Signed-off-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-09-04SELinux: memory leak in security_context_to_sid_coreEric Paris
Fix a bug and a philosophical decision about who handles errors. security_context_to_sid_core() was leaking a context in the common case. This was causing problems on fedora systems which recently have started making extensive use of this function. In discussion it was decided that if string_to_context_struct() had an error it was its own responsibility to clean up any mess it created along the way. Signed-off-by: Eric Paris <eparis@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-08-29SELinux: add boundary support and thread context assignmentKaiGai Kohei
The purpose of this patch is to assign per-thread security context under a constraint. It enables multi-threaded server application to kick a request handler with its fair security context, and helps some of userspace object managers to handle user's request. When we assign a per-thread security context, it must not have wider permissions than the original one. Because a multi-threaded process shares a single local memory, an arbitary per-thread security context also means another thread can easily refer violated information. The constraint on a per-thread security context requires a new domain has to be equal or weaker than its original one, when it tries to assign a per-thread security context. Bounds relationship between two types is a way to ensure a domain can never have wider permission than its bounds. We can define it in two explicit or implicit ways. The first way is using new TYPEBOUNDS statement. It enables to define a boundary of types explicitly. The other one expand the concept of existing named based hierarchy. If we defines a type with "." separated name like "httpd_t.php", toolchain implicitly set its bounds on "httpd_t". This feature requires a new policy version. The 24th version (POLICYDB_VERSION_BOUNDARY) enables to ship them into kernel space, and the following patch enables to handle it. Signed-off-by: KaiGai Kohei <kaigai@ak.jp.nec.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
2008-08-28Merge branch 'master' into nextJames Morris
2008-08-15selinux: Unify for- and while-loop styleVesa-Matti Kari
Replace "thing != NULL" comparisons with just "thing" to make the code look more uniform (mixed styles were used even in the same source file). Signed-off-by: Vesa-Matti Kari <vmkari@cc.helsinki.fi> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>