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authorLinus Torvalds <torvalds@ppc970.osdl.org>2005-04-16 15:20:36 -0700
committerLinus Torvalds <torvalds@ppc970.osdl.org>2005-04-16 15:20:36 -0700
commit1da177e4c3f41524e886b7f1b8a0c1fc7321cac2 (patch)
tree0bba044c4ce775e45a88a51686b5d9f90697ea9d /Documentation/usb
downloadconfigs-1da177e4c3f41524e886b7f1b8a0c1fc7321cac2.tar.gz
Linux-2.6.12-rc2v2.6.12-rc2
Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history, even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about 3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good infrastructure for it. Let it rip!
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation/usb')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/CREDITS175
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/URB.txt252
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/acm.txt138
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/auerswald.txt30
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/bluetooth.txt44
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/dma.txt116
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/ehci.txt212
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/error-codes.txt167
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/gadget_serial.txt332
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/hiddev.txt205
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/hotplug.txt148
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/ibmcam.txt324
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/linux.inf200
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/mtouchusb.txt76
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/ohci.txt32
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/ov511.txt289
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/proc_usb_info.txt371
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/rio.txt138
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/se401.txt54
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/sn9c102.txt480
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/stv680.txt55
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/uhci.txt165
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/usb-help.txt19
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/usb-serial.txt470
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/usbmon.txt156
-rw-r--r--Documentation/usb/w9968cf.txt481
26 files changed, 5129 insertions, 0 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/CREDITS b/Documentation/usb/CREDITS
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..01e7f857ef3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/CREDITS
@@ -0,0 +1,175 @@
+Credits for the Simple Linux USB Driver:
+
+The following people have contributed to this code (in alphabetical
+order by last name). I'm sure this list should be longer, its
+difficult to maintain, add yourself with a patch if desired.
+
+ Georg Acher <acher@informatik.tu-muenchen.de>
+ David Brownell <dbrownell@users.sourceforge.net>
+ Alan Cox <alan@lxorguk.ukuu.org.uk>
+ Randy Dunlap <randy.dunlap@intel.com>
+ Johannes Erdfelt <johannes@erdfelt.com>
+ Deti Fliegl <deti@fliegl.de>
+ ham <ham@unsuave.com>
+ Bradley M Keryan <keryan@andrew.cmu.edu>
+ Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com>
+ Pavel Machek <pavel@suse.cz>
+ Paul Mackerras <paulus@cs.anu.edu.au>
+ Petko Manlolov <petkan@dce.bg>
+ David E. Nelson <dnelson@jump.net>
+ Vojtech Pavlik <vojtech@suse.cz>
+ Bill Ryder <bryder@sgi.com>
+ Thomas Sailer <sailer@ife.ee.ethz.ch>
+ Gregory P. Smith <greg@electricrain.com>
+ Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
+ Roman Weissgaerber <weissg@vienna.at>
+ <Kazuki.Yasumatsu@fujixerox.co.jp>
+
+Special thanks to:
+
+ Inaky Perez Gonzalez <inaky@peloncho.fis.ucm.es> for starting the
+ Linux USB driver effort and writing much of the larger uusbd driver.
+ Much has been learned from that effort.
+
+ The NetBSD & FreeBSD USB developers. For being on the Linux USB list
+ and offering suggestions and sharing implementation experiences.
+
+Additional thanks to the following companies and people for donations
+of hardware, support, time and development (this is from the original
+THANKS file in Inaky's driver):
+
+ The following corporations have helped us in the development
+ of Linux USB / UUSBD:
+
+ - 3Com GmbH for donating a ISDN Pro TA and supporting me
+ in technical questions and with test equipment. I'd never
+ expect such a great help.
+
+ - USAR Systems provided us with one of their excellent USB
+ Evaluation Kits. It allows us to test the Linux-USB driver
+ for compliance with the latest USB specification. USAR
+ Systems recognized the importance of an up-to-date open
+ Operating System and supports this project with
+ Hardware. Thanks!.
+
+ - Thanks to Intel Corporation for their precious help.
+
+ - We teamed up with Cherry to make Linux the first OS with
+ built-in USB support. Cherry is one of the biggest keyboard
+ makers in the world.
+
+ - CMD Technology, Inc. sponsored us kindly donating a CSA-6700
+ PCI-to-USB Controller Board to test the OHCI implementation.
+
+ - Due to their support to us, Keytronic can be sure that they
+ will sell keyboards to some of the 3 million (at least)
+ Linux users.
+
+ - Many thanks to ing büro h doran [http://www.ibhdoran.com]!
+ It was almost impossible to get a PC backplate USB connector
+ for the motherboard here at Europe (mine, home-made, was
+ quite lousy :). Now I know where to acquire nice USB stuff!
+
+ - Genius Germany donated a USB mouse to test the mouse boot
+ protocol. They've also donated a F-23 digital joystick and a
+ NetMouse Pro. Thanks!
+
+ - AVM GmbH Berlin is supporting the development of the Linux
+ USB driver for the AVM ISDN Controller B1 USB. AVM is a
+ leading manufacturer for active and passive ISDN Controllers
+ and CAPI 2.0-based software. The active design of the AVM B1
+ is open for all OS platforms, including Linux.
+
+ - Thanks to Y-E Data, Inc. for donating their FlashBuster-U
+ USB Floppy Disk Drive, so we could test the bulk transfer
+ code.
+
+ - Many thanks to Logitech for contributing a three axis USB
+ mouse.
+
+ Logitech designs, manufactures and markets
+ Human Interface Devices, having a long history and
+ experience in making devices such as keyboards, mice,
+ trackballs, cameras, loudspeakers and control devices for
+ gaming and professional use.
+
+ Being a recognized vendor and seller for all these devices,
+ they have donated USB mice, a joystick and a scanner, as a
+ way to acknowledge the importance of Linux and to allow
+ Logitech customers to enjoy support in their favorite
+ operating systems and all Linux users to use Logitech and
+ other USB hardware.
+
+ Logitech is official sponsor of the Linux Conference on
+ Feb. 11th 1999 in Vienna, where we'll will present the
+ current state of the Linux USB effort.
+
+ - CATC has provided means to uncover dark corners of the UHCI
+ inner workings with a USB Inspector.
+
+ - Thanks to Entrega for providing PCI to USB cards, hubs and
+ converter products for development.
+
+ - Thanks to ConnectTech for providing a WhiteHEAT usb to
+ serial converter, and the documentation for the device to
+ allow a driver to be written.
+
+ - Thanks to ADMtek for providing Pegasus and Pegasus II
+ evaluation boards, specs and valuable advices during
+ the driver development.
+
+ And thanks go to (hey! in no particular order :)
+
+ - Oren Tirosh <orenti@hishome.net>, for standing so patiently
+ all my doubts'bout USB and giving lots of cool ideas.
+
+ - Jochen Karrer <karrer@wpfd25.physik.uni-wuerzburg.de>, for
+ pointing out mortal bugs and giving advice.
+
+ - Edmund Humemberger <ed@atnet.at>, for it's great work on
+ public relationships and general management stuff for the
+ Linux-USB effort.
+
+ - Alberto Menegazzi <flash@flash.iol.it> is starting the
+ documentation for the UUSBD. Go for it!
+
+ - Ric Klaren <ia_ric@cs.utwente.nl> for doing nice
+ introductory documents (competing with Alberto's :).
+
+ - Christian Groessler <cpg@aladdin.de>, for it's help on those
+ itchy bits ... :)
+
+ - Paul MacKerras for polishing OHCI and pushing me harder for
+ the iMac support, giving improvements and enhancements.
+
+ - Fernando Herrera <fherrera@eurielec.etsit.upm.es> has taken
+ charge of composing, maintaining and feeding the
+ long-awaited, unique and marvelous UUSBD FAQ! Tadaaaa!!!
+
+ - Rasca Gmelch <thron@gmx.de> has revived the raw driver and
+ pointed bugs, as well as started the uusbd-utils package.
+
+ - Peter Dettori <dettori@ozy.dec.com> is uncovering bugs like
+ crazy, as well as making cool suggestions, great :)
+
+ - All the Free Software and Linux community, the FSF & the GNU
+ project, the MIT X consortium, the TeX people ... everyone!
+ You know who you are!
+
+ - Big thanks to Richard Stallman for creating Emacs!
+
+ - The people at the linux-usb mailing list, for reading so
+ many messages :) Ok, no more kidding; for all your advises!
+
+ - All the people at the USB Implementors Forum for their
+ help and assistance.
+
+ - Nathan Myers <ncm@cantrip.org>, for his advice! (hope you
+ liked Cibeles' party).
+
+ - Linus Torvalds, for starting, developing and managing Linux.
+
+ - Mike Smith, Craig Keithley, Thierry Giron and Janet Schank
+ for convincing me USB Standard hubs are not that standard
+ and that's good to allow for vendor specific quirks on the
+ standard hub driver.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/URB.txt b/Documentation/usb/URB.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..d59b95cc6f1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/URB.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,252 @@
+Revised: 2000-Dec-05.
+Again: 2002-Jul-06
+
+ NOTE:
+
+ The USB subsystem now has a substantial section in "The Linux Kernel API"
+ guide (in Documentation/DocBook), generated from the current source
+ code. This particular documentation file isn't particularly current or
+ complete; don't rely on it except for a quick overview.
+
+
+1.1. Basic concept or 'What is an URB?'
+
+The basic idea of the new driver is message passing, the message itself is
+called USB Request Block, or URB for short.
+
+- An URB consists of all relevant information to execute any USB transaction
+ and deliver the data and status back.
+
+- Execution of an URB is inherently an asynchronous operation, i.e. the
+ usb_submit_urb(urb) call returns immediately after it has successfully queued
+ the requested action.
+
+- Transfers for one URB can be canceled with usb_unlink_urb(urb) at any time.
+
+- Each URB has a completion handler, which is called after the action
+ has been successfully completed or canceled. The URB also contains a
+ context-pointer for passing information to the completion handler.
+
+- Each endpoint for a device logically supports a queue of requests.
+ You can fill that queue, so that the USB hardware can still transfer
+ data to an endpoint while your driver handles completion of another.
+ This maximizes use of USB bandwidth, and supports seamless streaming
+ of data to (or from) devices when using periodic transfer modes.
+
+
+1.2. The URB structure
+
+Some of the fields in an URB are:
+
+struct urb
+{
+// (IN) device and pipe specify the endpoint queue
+ struct usb_device *dev; // pointer to associated USB device
+ unsigned int pipe; // endpoint information
+
+ unsigned int transfer_flags; // ISO_ASAP, SHORT_NOT_OK, etc.
+
+// (IN) all urbs need completion routines
+ void *context; // context for completion routine
+ void (*complete)(struct urb *); // pointer to completion routine
+
+// (OUT) status after each completion
+ int status; // returned status
+
+// (IN) buffer used for data transfers
+ void *transfer_buffer; // associated data buffer
+ int transfer_buffer_length; // data buffer length
+ int number_of_packets; // size of iso_frame_desc
+
+// (OUT) sometimes only part of CTRL/BULK/INTR transfer_buffer is used
+ int actual_length; // actual data buffer length
+
+// (IN) setup stage for CTRL (pass a struct usb_ctrlrequest)
+ unsigned char* setup_packet; // setup packet (control only)
+
+// Only for PERIODIC transfers (ISO, INTERRUPT)
+ // (IN/OUT) start_frame is set unless ISO_ASAP isn't set
+ int start_frame; // start frame
+ int interval; // polling interval
+
+ // ISO only: packets are only "best effort"; each can have errors
+ int error_count; // number of errors
+ struct usb_iso_packet_descriptor iso_frame_desc[0];
+};
+
+Your driver must create the "pipe" value using values from the appropriate
+endpoint descriptor in an interface that it's claimed.
+
+
+1.3. How to get an URB?
+
+URBs are allocated with the following call
+
+ struct urb *usb_alloc_urb(int isoframes, int mem_flags)
+
+Return value is a pointer to the allocated URB, 0 if allocation failed.
+The parameter isoframes specifies the number of isochronous transfer frames
+you want to schedule. For CTRL/BULK/INT, use 0. The mem_flags parameter
+holds standard memory allocation flags, letting you control (among other
+things) whether the underlying code may block or not.
+
+To free an URB, use
+
+ void usb_free_urb(struct urb *urb)
+
+You may not free an urb that you've submitted, but which hasn't yet been
+returned to you in a completion callback.
+
+
+1.4. What has to be filled in?
+
+Depending on the type of transaction, there are some inline functions
+defined in <linux/usb.h> to simplify the initialization, such as
+fill_control_urb() and fill_bulk_urb(). In general, they need the usb
+device pointer, the pipe (usual format from usb.h), the transfer buffer,
+the desired transfer length, the completion handler, and its context.
+Take a look at the some existing drivers to see how they're used.
+
+Flags:
+For ISO there are two startup behaviors: Specified start_frame or ASAP.
+For ASAP set URB_ISO_ASAP in transfer_flags.
+
+If short packets should NOT be tolerated, set URB_SHORT_NOT_OK in
+transfer_flags.
+
+
+1.5. How to submit an URB?
+
+Just call
+
+ int usb_submit_urb(struct urb *urb, int mem_flags)
+
+The mem_flags parameter, such as SLAB_ATOMIC, controls memory allocation,
+such as whether the lower levels may block when memory is tight.
+
+It immediately returns, either with status 0 (request queued) or some
+error code, usually caused by the following:
+
+- Out of memory (-ENOMEM)
+- Unplugged device (-ENODEV)
+- Stalled endpoint (-EPIPE)
+- Too many queued ISO transfers (-EAGAIN)
+- Too many requested ISO frames (-EFBIG)
+- Invalid INT interval (-EINVAL)
+- More than one packet for INT (-EINVAL)
+
+After submission, urb->status is -EINPROGRESS; however, you should never
+look at that value except in your completion callback.
+
+For isochronous endpoints, your completion handlers should (re)submit
+URBs to the same endpoint with the ISO_ASAP flag, using multi-buffering,
+to get seamless ISO streaming.
+
+
+1.6. How to cancel an already running URB?
+
+For an URB which you've submitted, but which hasn't been returned to
+your driver by the host controller, call
+
+ int usb_unlink_urb(struct urb *urb)
+
+It removes the urb from the internal list and frees all allocated
+HW descriptors. The status is changed to reflect unlinking. After
+usb_unlink_urb() returns with that status code, you can free the URB
+with usb_free_urb().
+
+There is also an asynchronous unlink mode. To use this, set the
+the URB_ASYNC_UNLINK flag in urb->transfer flags before calling
+usb_unlink_urb(). When using async unlinking, the URB will not
+normally be unlinked when usb_unlink_urb() returns. Instead, wait
+for the completion handler to be called.
+
+
+1.7. What about the completion handler?
+
+The handler is of the following type:
+
+ typedef void (*usb_complete_t)(struct urb *);
+
+i.e. it gets just the URB that caused the completion call.
+In the completion handler, you should have a look at urb->status to
+detect any USB errors. Since the context parameter is included in the URB,
+you can pass information to the completion handler.
+
+Note that even when an error (or unlink) is reported, data may have been
+transferred. That's because USB transfers are packetized; it might take
+sixteen packets to transfer your 1KByte buffer, and ten of them might
+have transferred succesfully before the completion is called.
+
+
+NOTE: ***** WARNING *****
+Don't use urb->dev field in your completion handler; it's cleared
+as part of giving urbs back to drivers. (Addressing an issue with
+ownership of periodic URBs, which was otherwise ambiguous.) Instead,
+use urb->context to hold all the data your driver needs.
+
+NOTE: ***** WARNING *****
+Also, NEVER SLEEP IN A COMPLETION HANDLER. These are normally called
+during hardware interrupt processing. If you can, defer substantial
+work to a tasklet (bottom half) to keep system latencies low. You'll
+probably need to use spinlocks to protect data structures you manipulate
+in completion handlers.
+
+
+1.8. How to do isochronous (ISO) transfers?
+
+For ISO transfers you have to fill a usb_iso_packet_descriptor structure,
+allocated at the end of the URB by usb_alloc_urb(n,mem_flags), for each
+packet you want to schedule. You also have to set urb->interval to say
+how often to make transfers; it's often one per frame (which is once
+every microframe for highspeed devices). The actual interval used will
+be a power of two that's no bigger than what you specify.
+
+The usb_submit_urb() call modifies urb->interval to the implemented interval
+value that is less than or equal to the requested interval value. If
+ISO_ASAP scheduling is used, urb->start_frame is also updated.
+
+For each entry you have to specify the data offset for this frame (base is
+transfer_buffer), and the length you want to write/expect to read.
+After completion, actual_length contains the actual transferred length and
+status contains the resulting status for the ISO transfer for this frame.
+It is allowed to specify a varying length from frame to frame (e.g. for
+audio synchronisation/adaptive transfer rates). You can also use the length
+0 to omit one or more frames (striping).
+
+For scheduling you can choose your own start frame or ISO_ASAP. As explained
+earlier, if you always keep at least one URB queued and your completion
+keeps (re)submitting a later URB, you'll get smooth ISO streaming (if usb
+bandwidth utilization allows).
+
+If you specify your own start frame, make sure it's several frames in advance
+of the current frame. You might want this model if you're synchronizing
+ISO data with some other event stream.
+
+
+1.9. How to start interrupt (INT) transfers?
+
+Interrupt transfers, like isochronous transfers, are periodic, and happen
+in intervals that are powers of two (1, 2, 4 etc) units. Units are frames
+for full and low speed devices, and microframes for high speed ones.
+
+Currently, after you submit one interrupt URB, that urb is owned by the
+host controller driver until you cancel it with usb_unlink_urb(). You
+may unlink interrupt urbs in their completion handlers, if you need to.
+
+After a transfer completion is called, the URB is automagically resubmitted.
+THIS BEHAVIOR IS EXPECTED TO BE REMOVED!!
+
+Interrupt transfers may only send (or receive) the "maxpacket" value for
+the given interrupt endpoint; if you need more data, you will need to
+copy that data out of (or into) another buffer. Similarly, you can't
+queue interrupt transfers.
+THESE RESTRICTIONS ARE EXPECTED TO BE REMOVED!!
+
+Note that this automagic resubmission model does make it awkward to use
+interrupt OUT transfers. The portable solution involves unlinking those
+OUT urbs after the data is transferred, and perhaps submitting a final
+URB for a short packet.
+
+The usb_submit_urb() call modifies urb->interval to the implemented interval
+value that is less than or equal to the requested interval value.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/acm.txt b/Documentation/usb/acm.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..8ef45ea8f69
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/acm.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,138 @@
+ Linux ACM driver v0.16
+ (c) 1999 Vojtech Pavlik <vojtech@suse.cz>
+ Sponsored by SuSE
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+0. Disclaimer
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
+under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free
+Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option)
+any later version.
+
+ This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
+WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY
+or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for
+more details.
+
+ You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
+with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59
+Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
+
+ Should you need to contact me, the author, you can do so either by e-mail
+- mail your message to <vojtech@suse.cz>, or by paper mail: Vojtech Pavlik,
+Ucitelska 1576, Prague 8, 182 00 Czech Republic
+
+ For your convenience, the GNU General Public License version 2 is included
+in the package: See the file COPYING.
+
+1. Usage
+~~~~~~~~
+ The drivers/usb/class/cdc-acm.c drivers works with USB modems and USB ISDN terminal
+adapters that conform to the Universal Serial Bus Communication Device Class
+Abstract Control Model (USB CDC ACM) specification.
+
+ Many modems do, here is a list of those I know of:
+
+ 3Com OfficeConnect 56k
+ 3Com Voice FaxModem Pro
+ 3Com Sportster
+ MultiTech MultiModem 56k
+ Zoom 2986L FaxModem
+ Compaq 56k FaxModem
+ ELSA Microlink 56k
+
+ I know of one ISDN TA that does work with the acm driver:
+
+ 3Com USR ISDN Pro TA
+
+ Unfortunately many modems and most ISDN TAs use proprietary interfaces and
+thus won't work with this drivers. Check for ACM compliance before buying.
+
+ The driver (with devfs) creates these devices in /dev/usb/acm:
+
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 166, 0 Apr 1 10:49 0
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 166, 1 Apr 1 10:49 1
+ crw-r--r-- 1 root root 166, 2 Apr 1 10:49 2
+
+ And so on, up to 31, with the limit being possible to change in acm.c to up
+to 256, so you can use up to 256 USB modems with one computer (you'll need
+three USB cards for that, though).
+
+ If you don't use devfs, then you can create device nodes with the same
+minor/major numbers anywhere you want, but either the above location or
+/dev/usb/ttyACM0 is preferred.
+
+ To use the modems you need these modules loaded:
+
+ usbcore.ko
+ uhci-hcd.ko ohci-hcd.ko or ehci-hcd.ko
+ cdc-acm.ko
+
+ After that, the modem[s] should be accessible. You should be able to use
+minicom, ppp and mgetty with them.
+
+2. Verifying that it works
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ The first step would be to check /proc/bus/usb/devices, it should look
+like this:
+
+T: Bus=01 Lev=00 Prnt=00 Port=00 Cnt=00 Dev#= 1 Spd=12 MxCh= 2
+B: Alloc= 0/900 us ( 0%), #Int= 0, #Iso= 0
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0000 ProdID=0000 Rev= 0.00
+S: Product=USB UHCI Root Hub
+S: SerialNumber=6800
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=40 MxPwr= 0mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=hub
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 8 Ivl=255ms
+T: Bus=01 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=01 Cnt=01 Dev#= 2 Spd=12 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 2
+P: Vendor=04c1 ProdID=008f Rev= 2.07
+S: Manufacturer=3Com Inc.
+S: Product=3Com U.S. Robotics Pro ISDN TA
+S: SerialNumber=UFT53A49BVT7
+C: #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=60 MxPwr= 0mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 3 Cls=ff(vend.) Sub=ff Prot=ff Driver=acm
+E: Ad=85(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 64 Ivl= 0ms
+E: Ad=04(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 64 Ivl= 0ms
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 16 Ivl=128ms
+C:* #Ifs= 2 Cfg#= 2 Atr=60 MxPwr= 0mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=02 Prot=01 Driver=acm
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 16 Ivl=128ms
+I: If#= 1 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=0a(data ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=acm
+E: Ad=85(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 64 Ivl= 0ms
+E: Ad=04(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 64 Ivl= 0ms
+
+The presence of these three lines (and the Cls= 'comm' and 'data' classes)
+is important, it means it's an ACM device. The Driver=acm means the acm
+driver is used for the device. If you see only Cls=ff(vend.) then you're out
+of luck, you have a device with vendor specific-interface.
+
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 2
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=02 Prot=01 Driver=acm
+I: If#= 1 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=0a(data ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=acm
+
+In the system log you should see:
+
+usb.c: USB new device connect, assigned device number 2
+usb.c: kmalloc IF c7691fa0, numif 1
+usb.c: kmalloc IF c7b5f3e0, numif 2
+usb.c: skipped 4 class/vendor specific interface descriptors
+usb.c: new device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
+usb.c: USB device number 2 default language ID 0x409
+Manufacturer: 3Com Inc.
+Product: 3Com U.S. Robotics Pro ISDN TA
+SerialNumber: UFT53A49BVT7
+acm.c: probing config 1
+acm.c: probing config 2
+ttyACM0: USB ACM device
+acm.c: acm_control_msg: rq: 0x22 val: 0x0 len: 0x0 result: 0
+acm.c: acm_control_msg: rq: 0x20 val: 0x0 len: 0x7 result: 7
+usb.c: acm driver claimed interface c7b5f3e0
+usb.c: acm driver claimed interface c7b5f3f8
+usb.c: acm driver claimed interface c7691fa0
+
+If all this seems to be OK, fire up minicom and set it to talk to the ttyACM
+device and try typing 'at'. If it responds with 'OK', then everything is
+working.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/auerswald.txt b/Documentation/usb/auerswald.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..7ee4d8f6911
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/auerswald.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,30 @@
+ Auerswald USB kernel driver
+ ===========================
+
+What is it? What can I do with it?
+==================================
+The auerswald USB kernel driver connects your linux 2.4.x
+system to the auerswald usb-enabled devices.
+
+There are two types of auerswald usb devices:
+a) small PBX systems (ISDN)
+b) COMfort system telephones (ISDN)
+
+The driver installation creates the devices
+/dev/usb/auer0..15. These devices carry a vendor-
+specific protocol. You may run all auerswald java
+software on it. The java software needs a native
+library "libAuerUsbJNINative.so" installed on
+your system. This library is available from
+auerswald and shipped as part of the java software.
+
+You may create the devices with:
+ mknod -m 666 /dev/usb/auer0 c 180 112
+ ...
+ mknod -m 666 /dev/usb/auer15 c 180 127
+
+Future plans
+============
+- Connection to ISDN4LINUX (the hisax interface)
+
+The maintainer of this driver is wolfgang@iksw-muees.de
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/bluetooth.txt b/Documentation/usb/bluetooth.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..774f5d3835c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/bluetooth.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,44 @@
+INTRODUCTION
+
+ The USB Bluetooth driver supports any USB Bluetooth device.
+ It currently works well with the Linux USB Bluetooth stack from Axis
+ (available at http://developer.axis.com/software/bluetooth/ ) and
+ has been rumored to work with other Linux USB Bluetooth stacks.
+
+
+CONFIGURATION
+
+ Currently the driver can handle up to 256 different USB Bluetooth
+ devices at once.
+
+ If you are not using devfs:
+ The major number that the driver uses is 216 so to use the driver,
+ create the following nodes:
+ mknod /dev/ttyUB0 c 216 0
+ mknod /dev/ttyUB1 c 216 1
+ mknod /dev/ttyUB2 c 216 2
+ mknod /dev/ttyUB3 c 216 3
+ .
+ .
+ .
+ mknod /dev/ttyUB254 c 216 254
+ mknod /dev/ttyUB255 c 216 255
+
+ If you are using devfs:
+ The devices supported by this driver will show up as
+ /dev/usb/ttub/{0,1,...}
+
+ When the device is connected and recognized by the driver, the driver
+ will print to the system log, which node the device has been bound to.
+
+
+CONTACT:
+
+ If anyone has any problems using this driver, please contact me, or
+ join the Linux-USB mailing list (information on joining the mailing
+ list, as well as a link to its searchable archive is at
+ http://www.linux-usb.org/ )
+
+
+Greg Kroah-Hartman
+greg@kroah.com
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/dma.txt b/Documentation/usb/dma.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..62844aeba69
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/dma.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,116 @@
+In Linux 2.5 kernels (and later), USB device drivers have additional control
+over how DMA may be used to perform I/O operations. The APIs are detailed
+in the kernel usb programming guide (kerneldoc, from the source code).
+
+
+API OVERVIEW
+
+The big picture is that USB drivers can continue to ignore most DMA issues,
+though they still must provide DMA-ready buffers (see DMA-mapping.txt).
+That's how they've worked through the 2.4 (and earlier) kernels.
+
+OR: they can now be DMA-aware.
+
+- New calls enable DMA-aware drivers, letting them allocate dma buffers and
+ manage dma mappings for existing dma-ready buffers (see below).
+
+- URBs have an additional "transfer_dma" field, as well as a transfer_flags
+ bit saying if it's valid. (Control requests also have "setup_dma" and a
+ corresponding transfer_flags bit.)
+
+- "usbcore" will map those DMA addresses, if a DMA-aware driver didn't do
+ it first and set URB_NO_TRANSFER_DMA_MAP or URB_NO_SETUP_DMA_MAP. HCDs
+ don't manage dma mappings for URBs.
+
+- There's a new "generic DMA API", parts of which are usable by USB device
+ drivers. Never use dma_set_mask() on any USB interface or device; that
+ would potentially break all devices sharing that bus.
+
+
+ELIMINATING COPIES
+
+It's good to avoid making CPUs copy data needlessly. The costs can add up,
+and effects like cache-trashing can impose subtle penalties.
+
+- When you're allocating a buffer for DMA purposes anyway, use the buffer
+ primitives. Think of them as kmalloc and kfree that give you the right
+ kind of addresses to store in urb->transfer_buffer and urb->transfer_dma,
+ while guaranteeing that no hidden copies through DMA "bounce" buffers will
+ slow things down. You'd also set URB_NO_TRANSFER_DMA_MAP in
+ urb->transfer_flags:
+
+ void *usb_buffer_alloc (struct usb_device *dev, size_t size,
+ int mem_flags, dma_addr_t *dma);
+
+ void usb_buffer_free (struct usb_device *dev, size_t size,
+ void *addr, dma_addr_t dma);
+
+ For control transfers you can use the buffer primitives or not for each
+ of the transfer buffer and setup buffer independently. Set the flag bits
+ URB_NO_TRANSFER_DMA_MAP and URB_NO_SETUP_DMA_MAP to indicate which
+ buffers you have prepared. For non-control transfers URB_NO_SETUP_DMA_MAP
+ is ignored.
+
+ The memory buffer returned is "dma-coherent"; sometimes you might need to
+ force a consistent memory access ordering by using memory barriers. It's
+ not using a streaming DMA mapping, so it's good for small transfers on
+ systems where the I/O would otherwise tie up an IOMMU mapping. (See
+ Documentation/DMA-mapping.txt for definitions of "coherent" and "streaming"
+ DMA mappings.)
+
+ Asking for 1/Nth of a page (as well as asking for N pages) is reasonably
+ space-efficient.
+
+- Devices on some EHCI controllers could handle DMA to/from high memory.
+ Driver probe() routines can notice this using a generic DMA call, then
+ tell higher level code (network, scsi, etc) about it like this:
+
+ if (dma_supported (&intf->dev, 0xffffffffffffffffULL))
+ net->features |= NETIF_F_HIGHDMA;
+
+ That can eliminate dma bounce buffering of requests that originate (or
+ terminate) in high memory, in cases where the buffers aren't allocated
+ with usb_buffer_alloc() but instead are dma-mapped.
+
+
+WORKING WITH EXISTING BUFFERS
+
+Existing buffers aren't usable for DMA without first being mapped into the
+DMA address space of the device.
+
+- When you're using scatterlists, you can map everything at once. On some
+ systems, this kicks in an IOMMU and turns the scatterlists into single
+ DMA transactions:
+
+ int usb_buffer_map_sg (struct usb_device *dev, unsigned pipe,
+ struct scatterlist *sg, int nents);
+
+ void usb_buffer_dmasync_sg (struct usb_device *dev, unsigned pipe,
+ struct scatterlist *sg, int n_hw_ents);
+
+ void usb_buffer_unmap_sg (struct usb_device *dev, unsigned pipe,
+ struct scatterlist *sg, int n_hw_ents);
+
+ It's probably easier to use the new usb_sg_*() calls, which do the DMA
+ mapping and apply other tweaks to make scatterlist i/o be fast.
+
+- Some drivers may prefer to work with the model that they're mapping large
+ buffers, synchronizing their safe re-use. (If there's no re-use, then let
+ usbcore do the map/unmap.) Large periodic transfers make good examples
+ here, since it's cheaper to just synchronize the buffer than to unmap it
+ each time an urb completes and then re-map it on during resubmission.
+
+ These calls all work with initialized urbs: urb->dev, urb->pipe,
+ urb->transfer_buffer, and urb->transfer_buffer_length must all be
+ valid when these calls are used (urb->setup_packet must be valid too
+ if urb is a control request):
+
+ struct urb *usb_buffer_map (struct urb *urb);
+
+ void usb_buffer_dmasync (struct urb *urb);
+
+ void usb_buffer_unmap (struct urb *urb);
+
+ The calls manage urb->transfer_dma for you, and set URB_NO_TRANSFER_DMA_MAP
+ so that usbcore won't map or unmap the buffer. The same goes for
+ urb->setup_dma and URB_NO_SETUP_DMA_MAP for control requests.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/ehci.txt b/Documentation/usb/ehci.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..1536b7e7513
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/ehci.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,212 @@
+27-Dec-2002
+
+The EHCI driver is used to talk to high speed USB 2.0 devices using
+USB 2.0-capable host controller hardware. The USB 2.0 standard is
+compatible with the USB 1.1 standard. It defines three transfer speeds:
+
+ - "High Speed" 480 Mbit/sec (60 MByte/sec)
+ - "Full Speed" 12 Mbit/sec (1.5 MByte/sec)
+ - "Low Speed" 1.5 Mbit/sec
+
+USB 1.1 only addressed full speed and low speed. High speed devices
+can be used on USB 1.1 systems, but they slow down to USB 1.1 speeds.
+
+USB 1.1 devices may also be used on USB 2.0 systems. When plugged
+into an EHCI controller, they are given to a USB 1.1 "companion"
+controller, which is a OHCI or UHCI controller as normally used with
+such devices. When USB 1.1 devices plug into USB 2.0 hubs, they
+interact with the EHCI controller through a "Transaction Translator"
+(TT) in the hub, which turns low or full speed transactions into
+high speed "split transactions" that don't waste transfer bandwidth.
+
+At this writing, this driver has been seen to work with implementations
+of EHCI from (in alphabetical order): Intel, NEC, Philips, and VIA.
+Other EHCI implementations are becoming available from other vendors;
+you should expect this driver to work with them too.
+
+While usb-storage devices have been available since mid-2001 (working
+quite speedily on the 2.4 version of this driver), hubs have only
+been available since late 2001, and other kinds of high speed devices
+appear to be on hold until more systems come with USB 2.0 built-in.
+Such new systems have been available since early 2002, and became much
+more typical in the second half of 2002.
+
+Note that USB 2.0 support involves more than just EHCI. It requires
+other changes to the Linux-USB core APIs, including the hub driver,
+but those changes haven't needed to really change the basic "usbcore"
+APIs exposed to USB device drivers.
+
+- David Brownell
+ <dbrownell@users.sourceforge.net>
+
+
+FUNCTIONALITY
+
+This driver is regularly tested on x86 hardware, and has also been
+used on PPC hardware so big/little endianness issues should be gone.
+It's believed to do all the right PCI magic so that I/O works even on
+systems with interesting DMA mapping issues.
+
+Transfer Types
+
+At this writing the driver should comfortably handle all control, bulk,
+and interrupt transfers, including requests to USB 1.1 devices through
+transaction translators (TTs) in USB 2.0 hubs. But you may find bugs.
+
+High Speed Isochronous (ISO) transfer support is also functional, but
+at this writing no Linux drivers have been using that support.
+
+Full Speed Isochronous transfer support, through transaction translators,
+is not yet available. Note that split transaction support for ISO
+transfers can't share much code with the code for high speed ISO transfers,
+since EHCI represents these with a different data structure. So for now,
+most USB audio and video devices can't be connected to high speed buses.
+
+Driver Behavior
+
+Transfers of all types can be queued. This means that control transfers
+from a driver on one interface (or through usbfs) won't interfere with
+ones from another driver, and that interrupt transfers can use periods
+of one frame without risking data loss due to interrupt processing costs.
+
+The EHCI root hub code hands off USB 1.1 devices to its companion
+controller. This driver doesn't need to know anything about those
+drivers; a OHCI or UHCI driver that works already doesn't need to change
+just because the EHCI driver is also present.
+
+There are some issues with power management; suspend/resume doesn't
+behave quite right at the moment.
+
+Also, some shortcuts have been taken with the scheduling periodic
+transactions (interrupt and isochronous transfers). These place some
+limits on the number of periodic transactions that can be scheduled,
+and prevent use of polling intervals of less than one frame.
+
+
+USE BY
+
+Assuming you have an EHCI controller (on a PCI card or motherboard)
+and have compiled this driver as a module, load this like:
+
+ # modprobe ehci-hcd
+
+and remove it by:
+
+ # rmmod ehci-hcd
+
+You should also have a driver for a "companion controller", such as
+"ohci-hcd" or "uhci-hcd". In case of any trouble with the EHCI driver,
+remove its module and then the driver for that companion controller will
+take over (at lower speed) all the devices that were previously handled
+by the EHCI driver.
+
+Module parameters (pass to "modprobe") include:
+
+ log2_irq_thresh (default 0):
+ Log2 of default interrupt delay, in microframes. The default
+ value is 0, indicating 1 microframe (125 usec). Maximum value
+ is 6, indicating 2^6 = 64 microframes. This controls how often
+ the EHCI controller can issue interrupts.
+
+If you're using this driver on a 2.5 kernel, and you've enabled USB
+debugging support, you'll see three files in the "sysfs" directory for
+any EHCI controller:
+
+ "async" dumps the asynchronous schedule, used for control
+ and bulk transfers. Shows each active qh and the qtds
+ pending, usually one qtd per urb. (Look at it with
+ usb-storage doing disk I/O; watch the request queues!)
+ "periodic" dumps the periodic schedule, used for interrupt
+ and isochronous transfers. Doesn't show qtds.
+ "registers" show controller register state, and
+
+The contents of those files can help identify driver problems.
+
+
+Device drivers shouldn't care whether they're running over EHCI or not,
+but they may want to check for "usb_device->speed == USB_SPEED_HIGH".
+High speed devices can do things that full speed (or low speed) ones
+can't, such as "high bandwidth" periodic (interrupt or ISO) transfers.
+Also, some values in device descriptors (such as polling intervals for
+periodic transfers) use different encodings when operating at high speed.
+
+However, do make a point of testing device drivers through USB 2.0 hubs.
+Those hubs report some failures, such as disconnections, differently when
+transaction translators are in use; some drivers have been seen to behave
+badly when they see different faults than OHCI or UHCI report.
+
+
+PERFORMANCE
+
+USB 2.0 throughput is gated by two main factors: how fast the host
+controller can process requests, and how fast devices can respond to
+them. The 480 Mbit/sec "raw transfer rate" is obeyed by all devices,
+but aggregate throughput is also affected by issues like delays between
+individual high speed packets, driver intelligence, and of course the
+overall system load. Latency is also a performance concern.
+
+Bulk transfers are most often used where throughput is an issue. It's
+good to keep in mind that bulk transfers are always in 512 byte packets,
+and at most 13 of those fit into one USB 2.0 microframe. Eight USB 2.0
+microframes fit in a USB 1.1 frame; a microframe is 1 msec/8 = 125 usec.
+
+So more than 50 MByte/sec is available for bulk transfers, when both
+hardware and device driver software allow it. Periodic transfer modes
+(isochronous and interrupt) allow the larger packet sizes which let you
+approach the quoted 480 MBit/sec transfer rate.
+
+Hardware Performance
+
+At this writing, individual USB 2.0 devices tend to max out at around
+20 MByte/sec transfer rates. This is of course subject to change;
+and some devices now go faster, while others go slower.
+
+The first NEC implementation of EHCI seems to have a hardware bottleneck
+at around 28 MByte/sec aggregate transfer rate. While this is clearly
+enough for a single device at 20 MByte/sec, putting three such devices
+onto one bus does not get you 60 MByte/sec. The issue appears to be
+that the controller hardware won't do concurrent USB and PCI access,
+so that it's only trying six (or maybe seven) USB transactions each
+microframe rather than thirteen. (Seems like a reasonable trade off
+for a product that beat all the others to market by over a year!)
+
+It's expected that newer implementations will better this, throwing
+more silicon real estate at the problem so that new motherboard chip
+sets will get closer to that 60 MByte/sec target. That includes an
+updated implementation from NEC, as well as other vendors' silicon.
+
+There's a minimum latency of one microframe (125 usec) for the host
+to receive interrupts from the EHCI controller indicating completion
+of requests. That latency is tunable; there's a module option. By
+default ehci-hcd driver uses the minimum latency, which means that if
+you issue a control or bulk request you can often expect to learn that
+it completed in less than 250 usec (depending on transfer size).
+
+Software Performance
+
+To get even 20 MByte/sec transfer rates, Linux-USB device drivers will
+need to keep the EHCI queue full. That means issuing large requests,
+or using bulk queuing if a series of small requests needs to be issued.
+When drivers don't do that, their performance results will show it.
+
+In typical situations, a usb_bulk_msg() loop writing out 4 KB chunks is
+going to waste more than half the USB 2.0 bandwidth. Delays between the
+I/O completion and the driver issuing the next request will take longer
+than the I/O. If that same loop used 16 KB chunks, it'd be better; a
+sequence of 128 KB chunks would waste a lot less.
+
+But rather than depending on such large I/O buffers to make synchronous
+I/O be efficient, it's better to just queue up several (bulk) requests
+to the HC, and wait for them all to complete (or be canceled on error).
+Such URB queuing should work with all the USB 1.1 HC drivers too.
+
+In the Linux 2.5 kernels, new usb_sg_*() api calls have been defined; they
+queue all the buffers from a scatterlist. They also use scatterlist DMA
+mapping (which might apply an IOMMU) and IRQ reduction, all of which will
+help make high speed transfers run as fast as they can.
+
+
+TBD: Interrupt and ISO transfer performance issues. Those periodic
+transfers are fully scheduled, so the main issue is likely to be how
+to trigger "high bandwidth" modes.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/error-codes.txt b/Documentation/usb/error-codes.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..1e36f1661cd
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/error-codes.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,167 @@
+Revised: 2004-Oct-21
+
+This is the documentation of (hopefully) all possible error codes (and
+their interpretation) that can be returned from usbcore.
+
+Some of them are returned by the Host Controller Drivers (HCDs), which
+device drivers only see through usbcore. As a rule, all the HCDs should
+behave the same except for transfer speed dependent behaviors and the
+way certain faults are reported.
+
+
+**************************************************************************
+* Error codes returned by usb_submit_urb *
+**************************************************************************
+
+Non-USB-specific:
+
+0 URB submission went fine
+
+-ENOMEM no memory for allocation of internal structures
+
+USB-specific:
+
+-ENODEV specified USB-device or bus doesn't exist
+
+-ENOENT specified interface or endpoint does not exist or
+ is not enabled
+
+-ENXIO host controller driver does not support queuing of this type
+ of urb. (treat as a host controller bug.)
+
+-EINVAL a) Invalid transfer type specified (or not supported)
+ b) Invalid or unsupported periodic transfer interval
+ c) ISO: attempted to change transfer interval
+ d) ISO: number_of_packets is < 0
+ e) various other cases
+
+-EAGAIN a) specified ISO start frame too early
+ b) (using ISO-ASAP) too much scheduled for the future
+ wait some time and try again.
+
+-EFBIG Host controller driver can't schedule that many ISO frames.
+
+-EPIPE Specified endpoint is stalled. For non-control endpoints,
+ reset this status with usb_clear_halt().
+
+-EMSGSIZE (a) endpoint maxpacket size is zero; it is not usable
+ in the current interface altsetting.
+ (b) ISO packet is biger than endpoint maxpacket
+ (c) requested data transfer size is invalid (negative)
+
+-ENOSPC This request would overcommit the usb bandwidth reserved
+ for periodic transfers (interrupt, isochronous).
+
+-ESHUTDOWN The device or host controller has been disabled due to some
+ problem that could not be worked around.
+
+-EPERM Submission failed because urb->reject was set.
+
+-EHOSTUNREACH URB was rejected because the device is suspended.
+
+
+**************************************************************************
+* Error codes returned by in urb->status *
+* or in iso_frame_desc[n].status (for ISO) *
+**************************************************************************
+
+USB device drivers may only test urb status values in completion handlers.
+This is because otherwise there would be a race between HCDs updating
+these values on one CPU, and device drivers testing them on another CPU.
+
+A transfer's actual_length may be positive even when an error has been
+reported. That's because transfers often involve several packets, so that
+one or more packets could finish before an error stops further endpoint I/O.
+
+
+0 Transfer completed successfully
+
+-ENOENT URB was synchronously unlinked by usb_unlink_urb
+
+-EINPROGRESS URB still pending, no results yet
+ (That is, if drivers see this it's a bug.)
+
+-EPROTO (*, **) a) bitstuff error
+ b) no response packet received within the
+ prescribed bus turn-around time
+ c) unknown USB error
+
+-EILSEQ (*, **) a) CRC mismatch
+ b) no response packet received within the
+ prescribed bus turn-around time
+ c) unknown USB error
+
+ Note that often the controller hardware does not
+ distinguish among cases a), b), and c), so a
+ driver cannot tell whether there was a protocol
+ error, a failure to respond (often caused by
+ device disconnect), or some other fault.
+
+-ETIMEDOUT (**) No response packet received within the prescribed
+ bus turn-around time. This error may instead be
+ reported as -EPROTO or -EILSEQ.
+
+ Note that the synchronous USB message functions
+ also use this code to indicate timeout expired
+ before the transfer completed.
+
+-EPIPE (**) Endpoint stalled. For non-control endpoints,
+ reset this status with usb_clear_halt().
+
+-ECOMM During an IN transfer, the host controller
+ received data from an endpoint faster than it
+ could be written to system memory
+
+-ENOSR During an OUT transfer, the host controller
+ could not retrieve data from system memory fast
+ enough to keep up with the USB data rate
+
+-EOVERFLOW (*) The amount of data returned by the endpoint was
+ greater than either the max packet size of the
+ endpoint or the remaining buffer size. "Babble".
+
+-EREMOTEIO The data read from the endpoint did not fill the
+ specified buffer, and URB_SHORT_NOT_OK was set in
+ urb->transfer_flags.
+
+-ENODEV Device was removed. Often preceded by a burst of
+ other errors, since the hub driver does't detect
+ device removal events immediately.
+
+-EXDEV ISO transfer only partially completed
+ look at individual frame status for details
+
+-EINVAL ISO madness, if this happens: Log off and go home
+
+-ECONNRESET URB was asynchronously unlinked by usb_unlink_urb
+
+-ESHUTDOWN The device or host controller has been disabled due
+ to some problem that could not be worked around,
+ such as a physical disconnect.
+
+
+(*) Error codes like -EPROTO, -EILSEQ and -EOVERFLOW normally indicate
+hardware problems such as bad devices (including firmware) or cables.
+
+(**) This is also one of several codes that different kinds of host
+controller use to to indicate a transfer has failed because of device
+disconnect. In the interval before the hub driver starts disconnect
+processing, devices may receive such fault reports for every request.
+
+
+
+**************************************************************************
+* Error codes returned by usbcore-functions *
+* (expect also other submit and transfer status codes) *
+**************************************************************************
+
+usb_register():
+-EINVAL error during registering new driver
+
+usb_get_*/usb_set_*():
+usb_control_msg():
+usb_bulk_msg():
+-ETIMEDOUT Timeout expired before the transfer completed.
+ In the future this code may change to -ETIME,
+ whose definition is a closer match to this sort
+ of error.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/gadget_serial.txt b/Documentation/usb/gadget_serial.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..a938c3dd13d
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/gadget_serial.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,332 @@
+
+ Linux Gadget Serial Driver v2.0
+ 11/20/2004
+
+
+License and Disclaimer
+----------------------
+This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
+modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
+published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of
+the License, or (at your option) any later version.
+
+This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
+but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
+GNU General Public License for more details.
+
+You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
+License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
+Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston,
+MA 02111-1307 USA.
+
+This document and the the gadget serial driver itself are
+Copyright (C) 2004 by Al Borchers (alborchers@steinerpoint.com).
+
+If you have questions, problems, or suggestions for this driver
+please contact Al Borchers at alborchers@steinerpoint.com.
+
+
+Prerequisites
+-------------
+Versions of the gadget serial driver are available for the
+2.4 Linux kernels, but this document assumes you are using
+version 2.0 or later of the gadget serial driver in a 2.6
+Linux kernel.
+
+This document assumes that you are familiar with Linux and
+Windows and know how to configure and build Linux kernels, run
+standard utilities, use minicom and HyperTerminal, and work with
+USB and serial devices. It also assumes you configure the Linux
+gadget and usb drivers as modules.
+
+
+Overview
+--------
+The gadget serial driver is a Linux USB gadget driver, a USB device
+side driver. It runs on a Linux system that has USB device side
+hardware; for example, a PDA, an embedded Linux system, or a PC
+with a USB development card.
+
+The gadget serial driver talks over USB to either a CDC ACM driver
+or a generic USB serial driver running on a host PC.
+
+ Host
+ --------------------------------------
+ | Host-Side CDC ACM USB Host |
+ | Operating | or | Controller | USB
+ | System | Generic USB | Driver |--------
+ | (Linux or | Serial | and | |
+ | Windows) Driver USB Stack | |
+ -------------------------------------- |
+ |
+ |
+ |
+ Gadget |
+ -------------------------------------- |
+ | Gadget USB Periph. | |
+ | Device-Side | Gadget | Controller | |
+ | Linux | Serial | Driver |--------
+ | Operating | Driver | and |
+ | System USB Stack |
+ --------------------------------------
+
+On the device-side Linux system, the gadget serial driver looks
+like a serial device.
+
+On the host-side system, the gadget serial device looks like a
+CDC ACM compliant class device or a simple vendor specific device
+with bulk in and bulk out endpoints, and it is treated similarly
+to other serial devices.
+
+The host side driver can potentially be any ACM compliant driver
+or any driver that can talk to a device with a simple bulk in/out
+interface. Gadget serial has been tested with the Linux ACM driver,
+the Windows usbser.sys ACM driver, and the Linux USB generic serial
+driver.
+
+With the gadget serial driver and the host side ACM or generic
+serial driver running, you should be able to communicate between
+the host and the gadget side systems as if they were connected by a
+serial cable.
+
+The gadget serial driver only provides simple unreliable data
+communication. It does not yet handle flow control or many other
+features of normal serial devices.
+
+
+Installing the Gadget Serial Driver
+-----------------------------------
+To use the gadget serial driver you must configure the Linux gadget
+side kernel for "Support for USB Gadgets", for a "USB Peripheral
+Controller" (for example, net2280), and for the "Serial Gadget"
+driver. All this are listed under "USB Gadget Support" when
+configuring the kernel. Then rebuild and install the kernel or
+modules.
+
+The gadget serial driver uses major number 127, for now. So you
+will need to create a device node for it, like this:
+
+ mknod /dev/ttygserial c 127 0
+
+You only need to do this once.
+
+Then you must load the gadget serial driver. To load it as an
+ACM device, do this:
+
+ modprobe g_serial use_acm=1
+
+To load it as a vendor specific bulk in/out device, do this:
+
+ modprobe g_serial
+
+This will also automatically load the underlying gadget peripheral
+controller driver. This must be done each time you reboot the gadget
+side Linux system. You can add this to the start up scripts, if
+desired.
+
+If gadget serial is loaded as an ACM device you will want to use
+either the Windows or Linux ACM driver on the host side. If gadget
+serial is loaded as a bulk in/out device, you will want to use the
+Linux generic serial driver on the host side. Follow the appropriate
+instructions below to install the host side driver.
+
+
+Installing the Windows Host ACM Driver
+--------------------------------------
+To use the Windows ACM driver you must have the files "gserial.inf"
+and "usbser.sys" together in a folder on the Windows machine.
+
+The "gserial.inf" file is given here.
+
+-------------------- CUT HERE --------------------
+[Version]
+Signature="$Windows NT$"
+Class=Ports
+ClassGuid={4D36E978-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}
+Provider=%LINUX%
+DriverVer=08/17/2004,0.0.2.0
+; Copyright (C) 2004 Al Borchers (alborchers@steinerpoint.com)
+
+[Manufacturer]
+%LINUX%=GSerialDeviceList
+
+[GSerialDeviceList]
+%GSERIAL%=GSerialInstall, USB\VID_0525&PID_A4A7
+
+[DestinationDirs]
+DefaultDestDir=10,System32\Drivers
+
+[GSerialInstall]
+CopyFiles=GSerialCopyFiles
+AddReg=GSerialAddReg
+
+[GSerialCopyFiles]
+usbser.sys
+
+[GSerialAddReg]
+HKR,,DevLoader,,*ntkern
+HKR,,NTMPDriver,,usbser.sys
+HKR,,EnumPropPages32,,"MsPorts.dll,SerialPortPropPageProvider"
+
+[GSerialInstall.Services]
+AddService = usbser,0x0002,GSerialService
+
+[GSerialService]
+DisplayName = %GSERIAL_DISPLAY_NAME%
+ServiceType = 1 ; SERVICE_KERNEL_DRIVER
+StartType = 3 ; SERVICE_DEMAND_START
+ErrorControl = 1 ; SERVICE_ERROR_NORMAL
+ServiceBinary = %10%\System32\Drivers\usbser.sys
+LoadOrderGroup = Base
+
+[Strings]
+LINUX = "Linux"
+GSERIAL = "Gadget Serial"
+GSERIAL_DISPLAY_NAME = "USB Gadget Serial Driver"
+-------------------- CUT HERE --------------------
+
+The "usbser.sys" file comes with various versions of Windows.
+For example, it can be found on Windows XP typically in
+
+ C:\WINDOWS\Driver Cache\i386\driver.cab
+
+Or it can be found on the Windows 98SE CD in the "win98" folder
+in the "DRIVER11.CAB" through "DRIVER20.CAB" cab files. You will
+need the DOS "expand" program, the Cygwin "cabextract" program, or
+a similar program to unpack these cab files and extract "usbser.sys".
+
+For example, to extract "usbser.sys" into the current directory
+on Windows XP, open a DOS window and run a command like
+
+ expand C:\WINDOWS\Driver~1\i386\driver.cab -F:usbser.sys .
+
+(Thanks to Nishant Kamat for pointing out this DOS command.)
+
+When the gadget serial driver is loaded and the USB device connected
+to the Windows host with a USB cable, Windows should recognize the
+gadget serial device and ask for a driver. Tell Windows to find the
+driver in the folder that contains "gserial.inf" and "usbser.sys".
+
+For example, on Windows XP, when the gadget serial device is first
+plugged in, the "Found New Hardware Wizard" starts up. Select
+"Install from a list or specific location (Advanced)", then on
+the next screen select "Include this location in the search" and
+enter the path or browse to the folder containing "gserial.inf" and
+"usbser.sys". Windows will complain that the Gadget Serial driver
+has not passed Windows Logo testing, but select "Continue anyway"
+and finish the driver installation.
+
+On Windows XP, in the "Device Manager" (under "Control Panel",
+"System", "Hardware") expand the "Ports (COM & LPT)" entry and you
+should see "Gadget Serial" listed as the driver for one of the COM
+ports.
+
+To uninstall the Windows XP driver for "Gadget Serial", right click
+on the "Gadget Serial" entry in the "Device Manager" and select
+"Uninstall".
+
+
+Installing the Linux Host ACM Driver
+------------------------------------
+To use the Linux ACM driver you must configure the Linux host side
+kernel for "Support for Host-side USB" and for "USB Modem (CDC ACM)
+support".
+
+Once the gadget serial driver is loaded and the USB device connected
+to the Linux host with a USB cable, the host system should recognize
+the gadget serial device. For example, the command
+
+ cat /proc/bus/usb/devices
+
+should show something like this:
+
+T: Bus=01 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=01 Cnt=02 Dev#= 5 Spd=480 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 2.00 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS=64 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0525 ProdID=a4a7 Rev= 2.01
+S: Manufacturer=Linux 2.6.8.1 with net2280
+S: Product=Gadget Serial
+S: SerialNumber=0
+C:* #Ifs= 2 Cfg#= 2 Atr=c0 MxPwr= 2mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=02(comm.) Sub=02 Prot=01 Driver=acm
+E: Ad=83(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 8 Ivl=32ms
+I: If#= 1 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=0a(data ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=acm
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
+E: Ad=02(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
+
+If the host side Linux system is configured properly, the ACM driver
+should be loaded automatically. The command "lsmod" should show the
+"acm" module is loaded.
+
+
+Installing the Linux Host Generic USB Serial Driver
+---------------------------------------------------
+To use the Linux generic USB serial driver you must configure the
+Linux host side kernel for "Support for Host-side USB", for "USB
+Serial Converter support", and for the "USB Generic Serial Driver".
+
+Once the gadget serial driver is loaded and the USB device connected
+to the Linux host with a USB cable, the host system should recognize
+the gadget serial device. For example, the command
+
+ cat /proc/bus/usb/devices
+
+should show something like this:
+
+T: Bus=01 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=01 Cnt=02 Dev#= 6 Spd=480 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 2.00 Cls=ff(vend.) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS=64 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0525 ProdID=a4a6 Rev= 2.01
+S: Manufacturer=Linux 2.6.8.1 with net2280
+S: Product=Gadget Serial
+S: SerialNumber=0
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=c0 MxPwr= 2mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 2 Cls=0a(data ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=serial
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
+E: Ad=02(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 512 Ivl=0ms
+
+You must explicitly load the usbserial driver with parameters to
+configure it to recognize the gadget serial device, like this:
+
+ modprobe usbserial vendor=0x0525 product=0xA4A6
+
+If everything is working, usbserial will print a message in the
+system log saying something like "Gadget Serial converter now
+attached to ttyUSB0".
+
+
+Testing with Minicom or HyperTerminal
+-------------------------------------
+Once the gadget serial driver and the host driver are both installed,
+and a USB cable connects the gadget device to the host, you should
+be able to communicate over USB between the gadget and host systems.
+You can use minicom or HyperTerminal to try this out.
+
+On the gadget side run "minicom -s" to configure a new minicom
+session. Under "Serial port setup" set "/dev/ttygserial" as the
+"Serial Device". Set baud rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits,
+to 9600, 8, none, and 1--these settings mostly do not matter.
+Under "Modem and dialing" erase all the modem and dialing strings.
+
+On a Linux host running the ACM driver, configure minicom similarly
+but use "/dev/ttyACM0" as the "Serial Device". (If you have other
+ACM devices connected, change the device name appropriately.)
+
+On a Linux host running the USB generic serial driver, configure
+minicom similarly, but use "/dev/ttyUSB0" as the "Serial Device".
+(If you have other USB serial devices connected, change the device
+name appropriately.)
+
+On a Windows host configure a new HyperTerminal session to use the
+COM port assigned to Gadget Serial. The "Port Settings" will be
+set automatically when HyperTerminal connects to the gadget serial
+device, so you can leave them set to the default values--these
+settings mostly do not matter.
+
+With minicom configured and running on the gadget side and with
+minicom or HyperTerminal configured and running on the host side,
+you should be able to send data back and forth between the gadget
+side and host side systems. Anything you type on the terminal
+window on the gadget side should appear in the terminal window on
+the host side and vice versa.
+
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/hiddev.txt b/Documentation/usb/hiddev.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..cd6fb4b58e1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/hiddev.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,205 @@
+Care and feeding of your Human Interface Devices
+
+INTRODUCTION
+
+In addition to the normal input type HID devices, USB also uses the
+human interface device protocols for things that are not really human
+interfaces, but have similar sorts of communication needs. The two big
+examples for this are power devices (especially uninterruptable power
+supplies) and monitor control on higher end monitors.
+
+To support these disparite requirements, the Linux USB system provides
+HID events to two separate interfaces:
+* the input subsystem, which converts HID events into normal input
+device interfaces (such as keyboard, mouse and joystick) and a
+normalised event interface - see Documentation/input/input.txt
+* the hiddev interface, which provides fairly raw HID events
+
+The data flow for a HID event produced by a device is something like
+the following :
+
+ usb.c ---> hid-core.c ----> hid-input.c ----> [keyboard/mouse/joystick/event]
+ |
+ |
+ --> hiddev.c ----> POWER / MONITOR CONTROL
+
+In addition, other subsystems (apart from USB) can potentially feed
+events into the input subsystem, but these have no effect on the hid
+device interface.
+
+USING THE HID DEVICE INTERFACE
+
+The hiddev interface is a char interface using the normal USB major,
+with the minor numbers starting at 96 and finishing at 111. Therefore,
+you need the following commands:
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev0 c 180 96
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev1 c 180 97
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev2 c 180 98
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev3 c 180 99
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev4 c 180 100
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev5 c 180 101
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev6 c 180 102
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev7 c 180 103
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev8 c 180 104
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev9 c 180 105
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev10 c 180 106
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev11 c 180 107
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev12 c 180 108
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev13 c 180 109
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev14 c 180 110
+mknod /dev/usb/hiddev15 c 180 111
+
+So you point your hiddev compliant user-space program at the correct
+interface for your device, and it all just works.
+
+Assuming that you have a hiddev compliant user-space program, of
+course. If you need to write one, read on.
+
+
+THE HIDDEV API
+This description should be read in conjunction with the HID
+specification, freely available from http://www.usb.org, and
+conveniently linked of http://www.linux-usb.org.
+
+The hiddev API uses a read() interface, and a set of ioctl() calls.
+
+HID devices exchange data with the host computer using data
+bundles called "reports". Each report is divided into "fields",
+each of which can have one or more "usages". In the hid-core,
+each one of these usages has a single signed 32 bit value.
+
+read():
+This is the event interface. When the HID device's state changes,
+it performs an interrupt transfer containing a report which contains
+the changed value. The hid-core.c module parses the report, and
+returns to hiddev.c the individual usages that have changed within
+the report. In its basic mode, the hiddev will make these individual
+usage changes available to the reader using a struct hiddev_event:
+
+ struct hiddev_event {
+ unsigned hid;
+ signed int value;
+ };
+
+containing the HID usage identifier for the status that changed, and
+the value that it was changed to. Note that the structure is defined
+within <linux/hiddev.h>, along with some other useful #defines and
+structures. The HID usage identifier is a composite of the HID usage
+page shifted to the 16 high order bits ORed with the usage code. The
+behavior of the read() function can be modified using the HIDIOCSFLAG
+ioctl() described below.
+
+
+ioctl():
+This is the control interface. There are a number of controls:
+
+HIDIOCGVERSION - int (read)
+Gets the version code out of the hiddev driver.
+
+HIDIOCAPPLICATION - (none)
+This ioctl call returns the HID application usage associated with the
+hid device. The third argument to ioctl() specifies which application
+index to get. This is useful when the device has more than one
+application collection. If the index is invalid (greater or equal to
+the number of application collections this device has) the ioctl
+returns -1. You can find out beforehand how many application
+collections the device has from the num_applications field from the
+hiddev_devinfo structure.
+
+HIDIOCGCOLLECTIONINFO - struct hiddev_collection_info (read/write)
+This returns a superset of the information above, providing not only
+application collections, but all the collections the device has. It
+also returns the level the collection lives in the hierarchy.
+The user passes in a hiddev_collection_info struct with the index
+field set to the index that should be returned. The ioctl fills in
+the other fields. If the index is larger than the last collection
+index, the ioctl returns -1 and sets errno to -EINVAL.
+
+HIDIOCGDEVINFO - struct hiddev_devinfo (read)
+Gets a hiddev_devinfo structure which describes the device.
+
+HIDIOCGSTRING - struct struct hiddev_string_descriptor (read/write)
+Gets a string descriptor from the device. The caller must fill in the
+"index" field to indicate which descriptor should be returned.
+
+HIDIOCINITREPORT - (none)
+Instructs the kernel to retrieve all input and feature report values
+from the device. At this point, all the usage structures will contain
+current values for the device, and will maintain it as the device
+changes. Note that the use of this ioctl is unnecessary in general,
+since later kernels automatically initialize the reports from the
+device at attach time.
+
+HIDIOCGNAME - string (variable length)
+Gets the device name
+
+HIDIOCGREPORT - struct hiddev_report_info (write)
+Instructs the kernel to get a feature or input report from the device,
+in order to selectively update the usage structures (in contrast to
+INITREPORT).
+
+HIDIOCSREPORT - struct hiddev_report_info (write)
+Instructs the kernel to send a report to the device. This report can
+be filled in by the user through HIDIOCSUSAGE calls (below) to fill in
+individual usage values in the report before sending the report in full
+to the device.
+
+HIDIOCGREPORTINFO - struct hiddev_report_info (read/write)
+Fills in a hiddev_report_info structure for the user. The report is
+looked up by type (input, output or feature) and id, so these fields
+must be filled in by the user. The ID can be absolute -- the actual
+report id as reported by the device -- or relative --
+HID_REPORT_ID_FIRST for the first report, and (HID_REPORT_ID_NEXT |
+report_id) for the next report after report_id. Without a-priori
+information about report ids, the right way to use this ioctl is to
+use the relative IDs above to enumerate the valid IDs. The ioctl
+returns non-zero when there is no more next ID. The real report ID is
+filled into the returned hiddev_report_info structure.
+
+HIDIOCGFIELDINFO - struct hiddev_field_info (read/write)
+Returns the field information associated with a report in a
+hiddev_field_info structure. The user must fill in report_id and
+report_type in this structure, as above. The field_index should also
+be filled in, which should be a number from 0 and maxfield-1, as
+returned from a previous HIDIOCGREPORTINFO call.
+
+HIDIOCGUCODE - struct hiddev_usage_ref (read/write)
+Returns the usage_code in a hiddev_usage_ref structure, given that
+given its report type, report id, field index, and index within the
+field have already been filled into the structure.
+
+HIDIOCGUSAGE - struct hiddev_usage_ref (read/write)
+Returns the value of a usage in a hiddev_usage_ref structure. The
+usage to be retrieved can be specified as above, or the user can
+choose to fill in the report_type field and specify the report_id as
+HID_REPORT_ID_UNKNOWN. In this case, the hiddev_usage_ref will be
+filled in with the report and field information associated with this
+usage if it is found.
+
+HIDIOCSUSAGE - struct hiddev_usage_ref (write)
+Sets the value of a usage in an output report. The user fills in
+the hiddev_usage_ref structure as above, but additionally fills in
+the value field.
+
+HIDIOGCOLLECTIONINDEX - struct hiddev_usage_ref (write)
+Returns the collection index associated with this usage. This
+indicates where in the collection hierarchy this usage sits.
+
+HIDIOCGFLAG - int (read)
+HIDIOCSFLAG - int (write)
+These operations respectively inspect and replace the mode flags
+that influence the read() call above. The flags are as follows:
+
+ HIDDEV_FLAG_UREF - read() calls will now return
+ struct hiddev_usage_ref instead of struct hiddev_event.
+ This is a larger structure, but in situations where the
+ device has more than one usage in its reports with the
+ same usage code, this mode serves to resolve such
+ ambiguity.
+
+ HIDDEV_FLAG_REPORT - This flag can only be used in conjunction
+ with HIDDEV_FLAG_UREF. With this flag set, when the device
+ sends a report, a struct hiddev_usage_ref will be returned
+ to read() filled in with the report_type and report_id, but
+ with field_index set to FIELD_INDEX_NONE. This serves as
+ additional notification when the device has sent a report.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/hotplug.txt b/Documentation/usb/hotplug.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..f53170665f3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/hotplug.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,148 @@
+LINUX HOTPLUGGING
+
+In hotpluggable busses like USB (and Cardbus PCI), end-users plug devices
+into the bus with power on. In most cases, users expect the devices to become
+immediately usable. That means the system must do many things, including:
+
+ - Find a driver that can handle the device. That may involve
+ loading a kernel module; newer drivers can use module-init-tools
+ to publish their device (and class) support to user utilities.
+
+ - Bind a driver to that device. Bus frameworks do that using a
+ device driver's probe() routine.
+
+ - Tell other subsystems to configure the new device. Print
+ queues may need to be enabled, networks brought up, disk
+ partitions mounted, and so on. In some cases these will
+ be driver-specific actions.
+
+This involves a mix of kernel mode and user mode actions. Making devices
+be immediately usable means that any user mode actions can't wait for an
+administrator to do them: the kernel must trigger them, either passively
+(triggering some monitoring daemon to invoke a helper program) or
+actively (calling such a user mode helper program directly).
+
+Those triggered actions must support a system's administrative policies;
+such programs are called "policy agents" here. Typically they involve
+shell scripts that dispatch to more familiar administration tools.
+
+Because some of those actions rely on information about drivers (metadata)
+that is currently available only when the drivers are dynamically linked,
+you get the best hotplugging when you configure a highly modular system.
+
+
+KERNEL HOTPLUG HELPER (/sbin/hotplug)
+
+When you compile with CONFIG_HOTPLUG, you get a new kernel parameter:
+/proc/sys/kernel/hotplug, which normally holds the pathname "/sbin/hotplug".
+That parameter names a program which the kernel may invoke at various times.
+
+The /sbin/hotplug program can be invoked by any subsystem as part of its
+reaction to a configuration change, from a thread in that subsystem.
+Only one parameter is required: the name of a subsystem being notified of
+some kernel event. That name is used as the first key for further event
+dispatch; any other argument and environment parameters are specified by
+the subsystem making that invocation.
+
+Hotplug software and other resources is available at:
+
+ http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net
+
+Mailing list information is also available at that site.
+
+
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+
+USB POLICY AGENT
+
+The USB subsystem currently invokes /sbin/hotplug when USB devices
+are added or removed from system. The invocation is done by the kernel
+hub daemon thread [khubd], or else as part of root hub initialization
+(done by init, modprobe, kapmd, etc). Its single command line parameter
+is the string "usb", and it passes these environment variables:
+
+ ACTION ... "add", "remove"
+ PRODUCT ... USB vendor, product, and version codes (hex)
+ TYPE ... device class codes (decimal)
+ INTERFACE ... interface 0 class codes (decimal)
+
+If "usbdevfs" is configured, DEVICE and DEVFS are also passed. DEVICE is
+the pathname of the device, and is useful for devices with multiple and/or
+alternate interfaces that complicate driver selection. By design, USB
+hotplugging is independent of "usbdevfs": you can do most essential parts
+of USB device setup without using that filesystem, and without running a
+user mode daemon to detect changes in system configuration.
+
+Currently available policy agent implementations can load drivers for
+modules, and can invoke driver-specific setup scripts. The newest ones
+leverage USB module-init-tools support. Later agents might unload drivers.
+
+
+USB MODUTILS SUPPORT
+
+Current versions of module-init-tools will create a "modules.usbmap" file
+which contains the entries from each driver's MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE. Such
+files can be used by various user mode policy agents to make sure all the
+right driver modules get loaded, either at boot time or later.
+
+See <linux/usb.h> for full information about such table entries; or look
+at existing drivers. Each table entry describes one or more criteria to
+be used when matching a driver to a device or class of devices. The
+specific criteria are identified by bits set in "match_flags", paired
+with field values. You can construct the criteria directly, or with
+macros such as these, and use driver_info to store more information.
+
+ USB_DEVICE (vendorId, productId)
+ ... matching devices with specified vendor and product ids
+ USB_DEVICE_VER (vendorId, productId, lo, hi)
+ ... like USB_DEVICE with lo <= productversion <= hi
+ USB_INTERFACE_INFO (class, subclass, protocol)
+ ... matching specified interface class info
+ USB_DEVICE_INFO (class, subclass, protocol)
+ ... matching specified device class info
+
+A short example, for a driver that supports several specific USB devices
+and their quirks, might have a MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE like this:
+
+ static const struct usb_device_id mydriver_id_table = {
+ { USB_DEVICE (0x9999, 0xaaaa), driver_info: QUIRK_X },
+ { USB_DEVICE (0xbbbb, 0x8888), driver_info: QUIRK_Y|QUIRK_Z },
+ ...
+ { } /* end with an all-zeroes entry */
+ }
+ MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE (usb, mydriver_id_table);
+
+Most USB device drivers should pass these tables to the USB subsystem as
+well as to the module management subsystem. Not all, though: some driver
+frameworks connect using interfaces layered over USB, and so they won't
+need such a "struct usb_driver".
+
+Drivers that connect directly to the USB subsystem should be declared
+something like this:
+
+ static struct usb_driver mydriver = {
+ .name = "mydriver",
+ .id_table = mydriver_id_table,
+ .probe = my_probe,
+ .disconnect = my_disconnect,
+
+ /*
+ if using the usb chardev framework:
+ .minor = MY_USB_MINOR_START,
+ .fops = my_file_ops,
+ if exposing any operations through usbdevfs:
+ .ioctl = my_ioctl,
+ */
+ }
+
+When the USB subsystem knows about a driver's device ID table, it's used when
+choosing drivers to probe(). The thread doing new device processing checks
+drivers' device ID entries from the MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE against interface and
+device descriptors for the device. It will only call probe() if there is a
+match, and the third argument to probe() will be the entry that matched.
+
+If you don't provide an id_table for your driver, then your driver may get
+probed for each new device; the third parameter to probe() will be null.
+
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/ibmcam.txt b/Documentation/usb/ibmcam.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..ce2f21a3eac
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/ibmcam.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,324 @@
+README for Linux device driver for the IBM "C-It" USB video camera
+
+INTRODUCTION:
+
+This driver does not use all features known to exist in
+the IBM camera. However most of needed features work well.
+
+This driver was developed using logs of observed USB traffic
+which was produced by standard Windows driver (c-it98.sys).
+I did not have data sheets from Xirlink.
+
+Video formats:
+ 128x96 [model 1]
+ 176x144
+ 320x240 [model 2]
+ 352x240 [model 2]
+ 352x288
+Frame rate: 3 - 30 frames per second (FPS)
+External interface: USB
+Internal interface: Video For Linux (V4L)
+Supported controls:
+- by V4L: Contrast, Brightness, Color, Hue
+- by driver options: frame rate, lighting conditions, video format,
+ default picture settings, sharpness.
+
+SUPPORTED CAMERAS:
+
+Xirlink "C-It" camera, also known as "IBM PC Camera".
+The device uses proprietary ASIC (and compression method);
+it is manufactured by Xirlink. See http://www.xirlink.com/
+http://www.ibmpccamera.com or http://www.c-itnow.com/ for
+details and pictures.
+
+This very chipset ("X Chip", as marked at the factory)
+is used in several other cameras, and they are supported
+as well:
+
+- IBM NetCamera
+- Veo Stingray
+
+The Linux driver was developed with camera with following
+model number (or FCC ID): KSX-XVP510. This camera has three
+interfaces, each with one endpoint (control, iso, iso). This
+type of cameras is referred to as "model 1". These cameras are
+no longer manufactured.
+
+Xirlink now manufactures new cameras which are somewhat different.
+In particular, following models [FCC ID] belong to that category:
+
+XVP300 [KSX-X9903]
+XVP600 [KSX-X9902]
+XVP610 [KSX-X9902]
+
+(see http://www.xirlink.com/ibmpccamera/ for updates, they refer
+to these new cameras by Windows driver dated 12-27-99, v3005 BETA)
+These cameras have two interfaces, one endpoint in each (iso, bulk).
+Such type of cameras is referred to as "model 2". They are supported
+(with exception of 352x288 native mode).
+
+Some IBM NetCameras (Model 4) are made to generate only compressed
+video streams. This is great for performance, but unfortunately
+nobody knows how to decompress the stream :-( Therefore, these
+cameras are *unsupported* and if you try to use one of those, all
+you get is random colored horizontal streaks, not the image!
+If you have one of those cameras, you probably should return it
+to the store and get something that is supported.
+
+Tell me more about all that "model" business
+--------------------------------------------
+
+I just invented model numbers to uniquely identify flavors of the
+hardware/firmware that were sold. It was very confusing to use
+brand names or some other internal numbering schemes. So I found
+by experimentation that all Xirlink chipsets fall into four big
+classes, and I called them "models". Each model is programmed in
+its own way, and each model sends back the video in its own way.
+
+Quirks of Model 2 cameras:
+-------------------------
+
+Model 2 does not have hardware contrast control. Corresponding V4L
+control is implemented in software, which is not very nice to your
+CPU, but at least it works.
+
+This driver provides 352x288 mode by switching the camera into
+quasi-352x288 RGB mode (800 Kbits per frame) essentially limiting
+this mode to 10 frames per second or less, in ideal conditions on
+the bus (USB is shared, after all). The frame rate
+has to be programmed very conservatively. Additional concern is that
+frame rate depends on brightness setting; therefore the picture can
+be good at one brightness and broken at another! I did not want to fix
+the frame rate at slowest setting, but I had to move it pretty much down
+the scale (so that framerate option barely matters). I also noticed that
+camera after first powering up produces frames slightly faster than during
+consecutive uses. All this means that if you use 352x288 (which is
+default), be warned - you may encounter broken picture on first connect;
+try to adjust brightness - brighter image is slower, so USB will be able
+to send all data. However if you regularly use Model 2 cameras you may
+prefer 176x144 which makes perfectly good I420, with no scaling and
+lesser demands on USB (300 Kbits per second, or 26 frames per second).
+
+Another strange effect of 352x288 mode is the fine vertical grid visible
+on some colored surfaces. I am sure it is caused by me not understanding
+what the camera is trying to say. Blame trade secrets for that.
+
+The camera that I had also has a hardware quirk: if disconnected,
+it needs few minutes to "relax" before it can be plugged in again
+(poorly designed USB processor reset circuit?)
+
+[Veo Stingray with Product ID 0x800C is also Model 2, but I haven't
+observed this particular flaw in it.]
+
+Model 2 camera can be programmed for very high sensitivity (even starlight
+may be enough), this makes it convenient for tinkering with. The driver
+code has enough comments to help a programmer to tweak the camera
+as s/he feels necessary.
+
+WHAT YOU NEED:
+
+- A supported IBM PC (C-it) camera (model 1 or 2)
+
+- A Linux box with USB support (2.3/2.4; 2.2 w/backport may work)
+
+- A Video4Linux compatible frame grabber program such as xawtv.
+
+HOW TO COMPILE THE DRIVER:
+
+You need to compile the driver only if you are a developer
+or if you want to make changes to the code. Most distributions
+precompile all modules, so you can go directly to the next
+section "HOW TO USE THE DRIVER".
+
+The ibmcam driver uses usbvideo helper library (module),
+so if you are studying the ibmcam code you will be led there.
+
+The driver itself consists of only one file in usb/ directory:
+ibmcam.c. This file is included into the Linux kernel build
+process if you configure the kernel for CONFIG_USB_IBMCAM.
+Run "make xconfig" and in USB section you will find the IBM
+camera driver. Select it, save the configuration and recompile.
+
+HOW TO USE THE DRIVER:
+
+I recommend to compile driver as a module. This gives you an
+easier access to its configuration. The camera has many more
+settings than V4L can operate, so some settings are done using
+module options.
+
+To begin with, on most modern Linux distributions the driver
+will be automatically loaded whenever you plug the supported
+camera in. Therefore, you don't need to do anything. However
+if you want to experiment with some module parameters then
+you can load and unload the driver manually, with camera
+plugged in or unplugged.
+
+Typically module is installed with command 'modprobe', like this:
+
+# modprobe ibmcam framerate=1
+
+Alternatively you can use 'insmod' in similar fashion:
+
+# insmod /lib/modules/2.x.y/usb/ibmcam.o framerate=1
+
+Module can be inserted with camera connected or disconnected.
+
+The driver can have options, though some defaults are provided.
+
+Driver options: (* indicates that option is model-dependent)
+
+Name Type Range [default] Example
+-------------- -------------- -------------- ------------------
+debug Integer 0-9 [0] debug=1
+flags Integer 0-0xFF [0] flags=0x0d
+framerate Integer 0-6 [2] framerate=1
+hue_correction Integer 0-255 [128] hue_correction=115
+init_brightness Integer 0-255 [128] init_brightness=100
+init_contrast Integer 0-255 [192] init_contrast=200
+init_color Integer 0-255 [128] init_color=130
+init_hue Integer 0-255 [128] init_hue=115
+lighting Integer 0-2* [1] lighting=2
+sharpness Integer 0-6* [4] sharpness=3
+size Integer 0-2* [2] size=1
+
+Options for Model 2 only:
+
+Name Type Range [default] Example
+-------------- -------------- -------------- ------------------
+init_model2_rg Integer 0..255 [0x70] init_model2_rg=128
+init_model2_rg2 Integer 0..255 [0x2f] init_model2_rg2=50
+init_model2_sat Integer 0..255 [0x34] init_model2_sat=65
+init_model2_yb Integer 0..255 [0xa0] init_model2_yb=200
+
+debug You don't need this option unless you are a developer.
+ If you are a developer then you will see in the code
+ what values do what. 0=off.
+
+flags This is a bit mask, and you can combine any number of
+ bits to produce what you want. Usually you don't want
+ any of extra features this option provides:
+
+ FLAGS_RETRY_VIDIOCSYNC 1 This bit allows to retry failed
+ VIDIOCSYNC ioctls without failing.
+ Will work with xawtv, will not
+ with xrealproducer. Default is
+ not set.
+ FLAGS_MONOCHROME 2 Activates monochrome (b/w) mode.
+ FLAGS_DISPLAY_HINTS 4 Shows colored pixels which have
+ magic meaning to developers.
+ FLAGS_OVERLAY_STATS 8 Shows tiny numbers on screen,
+ useful only for debugging.
+ FLAGS_FORCE_TESTPATTERN 16 Shows blue screen with numbers.
+ FLAGS_SEPARATE_FRAMES 32 Shows each frame separately, as
+ it was received from the camera.
+ Default (not set) is to mix the
+ preceding frame in to compensate
+ for occasional loss of Isoc data
+ on high frame rates.
+ FLAGS_CLEAN_FRAMES 64 Forces "cleanup" of each frame
+ prior to use; relevant only if
+ FLAGS_SEPARATE_FRAMES is set.
+ Default is not to clean frames,
+ this is a little faster but may
+ produce flicker if frame rate is
+ too high and Isoc data gets lost.
+ FLAGS_NO_DECODING 128 This flag turns the video stream
+ decoder off, and dumps the raw
+ Isoc data from the camera into
+ the reading process. Useful to
+ developers, but not to users.
+
+framerate This setting controls frame rate of the camera. This is
+ an approximate setting (in terms of "worst" ... "best")
+ because camera changes frame rate depending on amount
+ of light available. Setting 0 is slowest, 6 is fastest.
+ Beware - fast settings are very demanding and may not
+ work well with all video sizes. Be conservative.
+
+hue_correction This highly optional setting allows to adjust the
+ hue of the image in a way slightly different from
+ what usual "hue" control does. Both controls affect
+ YUV colorspace: regular "hue" control adjusts only
+ U component, and this "hue_correction" option similarly
+ adjusts only V component. However usually it is enough
+ to tweak only U or V to compensate for colored light or
+ color temperature; this option simply allows more
+ complicated correction when and if it is necessary.
+
+init_brightness These settings specify _initial_ values which will be
+init_contrast used to set up the camera. If your V4L application has
+init_color its own controls to adjust the picture then these
+init_hue controls will be used too. These options allow you to
+ preconfigure the camera when it gets connected, before
+ any V4L application connects to it. Good for webcams.
+
+init_model2_rg These initial settings alter color balance of the
+init_model2_rg2 camera on hardware level. All four settings may be used
+init_model2_sat to tune the camera to specific lighting conditions. These
+init_model2_yb settings only apply to Model 2 cameras.
+
+lighting This option selects one of three hardware-defined
+ photosensitivity settings of the camera. 0=bright light,
+ 1=Medium (default), 2=Low light. This setting affects
+ frame rate: the dimmer the lighting the lower the frame
+ rate (because longer exposition time is needed). The
+ Model 2 cameras allow values more than 2 for this option,
+ thus enabling extremely high sensitivity at cost of frame
+ rate, color saturation and imaging sensor noise.
+
+sharpness This option controls smoothing (noise reduction)
+ made by camera. Setting 0 is most smooth, setting 6
+ is most sharp. Be aware that CMOS sensor used in the
+ camera is pretty noisy, so if you choose 6 you will
+ be greeted with "snowy" image. Default is 4. Model 2
+ cameras do not support this feature.
+
+size This setting chooses one of several image sizes that are
+ supported by this driver. Cameras may support more, but
+ it's difficult to reverse-engineer all formats.
+ Following video sizes are supported:
+
+ size=0 128x96 (Model 1 only)
+ size=1 160x120
+ size=2 176x144
+ size=3 320x240 (Model 2 only)
+ size=4 352x240 (Model 2 only)
+ size=5 352x288
+ size=6 640x480 (Model 3 only)
+
+ The 352x288 is the native size of the Model 1 sensor
+ array, so it's the best resolution the camera can
+ yield. The best resolution of Model 2 is 176x144, and
+ larger images are produced by stretching the bitmap.
+ Model 3 has sensor with 640x480 grid, and it works too,
+ but the frame rate will be exceptionally low (1-2 FPS);
+ it may be still OK for some applications, like security.
+ Choose the image size you need. The smaller image can
+ support faster frame rate. Default is 352x288.
+
+For more information and the Troubleshooting FAQ visit this URL:
+
+ http://www.linux-usb.org/ibmcam/
+
+WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE:
+
+- The button on the camera is not used. I don't know how to get to it.
+ I know now how to read button on Model 2, but what to do with it?
+
+- Camera reports its status back to the driver; however I don't know
+ what returned data means. If camera fails at some initialization
+ stage then something should be done, and I don't do that because
+ I don't even know that some command failed. This is mostly Model 1
+ concern because Model 2 uses different commands which do not return
+ status (and seem to complete successfully every time).
+
+- Some flavors of Model 4 NetCameras produce only compressed video
+ streams, and I don't know how to decode them.
+
+CREDITS:
+
+The code is based in no small part on the CPiA driver by Johannes Erdfelt,
+Randy Dunlap, and others. Big thanks to them for their pioneering work on that
+and the USB stack.
+
+I also thank John Lightsey for his donation of the Veo Stingray camera.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/linux.inf b/Documentation/usb/linux.inf
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..2f7217d124f
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/linux.inf
@@ -0,0 +1,200 @@
+; MS-Windows driver config matching some basic modes of the
+; Linux-USB Ethernet/RNDIS gadget firmware:
+;
+; - RNDIS plus CDC Ethernet ... this may be familiar as a DOCSIS
+; cable modem profile, and supports most non-Microsoft USB hosts
+;
+; - RNDIS plus CDC Subset ... used by hardware that incapable of
+; full CDC Ethernet support.
+;
+; Microsoft only directly supports RNDIS drivers, and bundled them into XP.
+; The Microsoft "Remote NDIS USB Driver Kit" is currently found at:
+; http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hwdev/resources/HWservices/rndis.mspx
+
+
+[Version]
+Signature = "$CHICAGO$"
+Class = Net
+ClassGUID = {4d36e972-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
+Provider = %Linux%
+Compatible = 1
+MillenniumPreferred = .ME
+DriverVer = 03/30/2004,0.0.0.0
+; catalog file would be used by WHQL
+;CatalogFile = Linux.cat
+
+[Manufacturer]
+%Linux% = LinuxDevices,NT.5.1
+
+[LinuxDevices]
+; NetChip IDs, used by both firmware modes
+%LinuxDevice% = RNDIS, USB\VID_0525&PID_a4a2
+
+[LinuxDevices.NT.5.1]
+%LinuxDevice% = RNDIS.NT.5.1, USB\VID_0525&PID_a4a2
+
+[ControlFlags]
+ExcludeFromSelect=*
+
+; Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition specific sections --------
+
+[RNDIS]
+DeviceID = usb8023
+MaxInstance = 512
+DriverVer = 03/30/2004,0.0.0.0
+AddReg = RNDIS_AddReg_98, RNDIS_AddReg_Common
+
+[RNDIS_AddReg_98]
+HKR, , DevLoader, 0, *ndis
+HKR, , DeviceVxDs, 0, usb8023.sys
+HKR, NDIS, LogDriverName, 0, "usb8023"
+HKR, NDIS, MajorNdisVersion, 1, 5
+HKR, NDIS, MinorNdisVersion, 1, 0
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, DefUpper, 0, "ndis3,ndis4,ndis5"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, DefLower, 0, "ethernet"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, UpperRange, 0, "ndis3,ndis4,ndis5"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, LowerRange, 0, "ethernet"
+HKR, Ndi\Install, ndis3, 0, "RNDIS_Install_98"
+HKR, Ndi\Install, ndis4, 0, "RNDIS_Install_98"
+HKR, Ndi\Install, ndis5, 0, "RNDIS_Install_98"
+HKR, Ndi, DeviceId, 0, "USB\VID_0525&PID_a4a2"
+
+[RNDIS_Install_98]
+CopyFiles=RNDIS_CopyFiles_98
+
+[RNDIS_CopyFiles_98]
+usb8023.sys, usb8023w.sys, , 0
+rndismp.sys, rndismpw.sys, , 0
+
+; Windows Millennium Edition specific sections --------------------
+
+[RNDIS.ME]
+DeviceID = usb8023
+MaxInstance = 512
+DriverVer = 03/30/2004,0.0.0.0
+AddReg = RNDIS_AddReg_ME, RNDIS_AddReg_Common
+Characteristics = 0x84 ; NCF_PHYSICAL + NCF_HAS_UI
+BusType = 15
+
+[RNDIS_AddReg_ME]
+HKR, , DevLoader, 0, *ndis
+HKR, , DeviceVxDs, 0, usb8023.sys
+HKR, NDIS, LogDriverName, 0, "usb8023"
+HKR, NDIS, MajorNdisVersion, 1, 5
+HKR, NDIS, MinorNdisVersion, 1, 0
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, DefUpper, 0, "ndis3,ndis4,ndis5"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, DefLower, 0, "ethernet"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, UpperRange, 0, "ndis3,ndis4,ndis5"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, LowerRange, 0, "ethernet"
+HKR, Ndi\Install, ndis3, 0, "RNDIS_Install_ME"
+HKR, Ndi\Install, ndis4, 0, "RNDIS_Install_ME"
+HKR, Ndi\Install, ndis5, 0, "RNDIS_Install_ME"
+HKR, Ndi, DeviceId, 0, "USB\VID_0525&PID_a4a2"
+
+[RNDIS_Install_ME]
+CopyFiles=RNDIS_CopyFiles_ME
+
+[RNDIS_CopyFiles_ME]
+usb8023.sys, usb8023m.sys, , 0
+rndismp.sys, rndismpm.sys, , 0
+
+; Windows 2000 specific sections ---------------------------------
+
+[RNDIS.NT]
+Characteristics = 0x84 ; NCF_PHYSICAL + NCF_HAS_UI
+BusType = 15
+DriverVer = 03/30/2004,0.0.0.0
+AddReg = RNDIS_AddReg_NT, RNDIS_AddReg_Common
+CopyFiles = RNDIS_CopyFiles_NT
+
+[RNDIS.NT.Services]
+AddService = USB_RNDIS, 2, RNDIS_ServiceInst_NT, RNDIS_EventLog
+
+[RNDIS_CopyFiles_NT]
+; no rename of files on Windows 2000, use the 'k' names as is
+usb8023k.sys, , , 0
+rndismpk.sys, , , 0
+
+[RNDIS_ServiceInst_NT]
+DisplayName = %ServiceDisplayName%
+ServiceType = 1
+StartType = 3
+ErrorControl = 1
+ServiceBinary = %12%\usb8023k.sys
+LoadOrderGroup = NDIS
+AddReg = RNDIS_WMI_AddReg_NT
+
+[RNDIS_WMI_AddReg_NT]
+HKR, , MofImagePath, 0x00020000, "System32\drivers\rndismpk.sys"
+
+; Windows XP specific sections -----------------------------------
+
+[RNDIS.NT.5.1]
+Characteristics = 0x84 ; NCF_PHYSICAL + NCF_HAS_UI
+BusType = 15
+DriverVer = 03/30/2004,0.0.0.0
+AddReg = RNDIS_AddReg_NT, RNDIS_AddReg_Common
+; no copyfiles - the files are already in place
+
+[RNDIS.NT.5.1.Services]
+AddService = USB_RNDIS, 2, RNDIS_ServiceInst_51, RNDIS_EventLog
+
+[RNDIS_ServiceInst_51]
+DisplayName = %ServiceDisplayName%
+ServiceType = 1
+StartType = 3
+ErrorControl = 1
+ServiceBinary = %12%\usb8023.sys
+LoadOrderGroup = NDIS
+AddReg = RNDIS_WMI_AddReg_51
+
+[RNDIS_WMI_AddReg_51]
+HKR, , MofImagePath, 0x00020000, "System32\drivers\rndismp.sys"
+
+; Windows 2000 and Windows XP common sections --------------------
+
+[RNDIS_AddReg_NT]
+HKR, Ndi, Service, 0, "USB_RNDIS"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, UpperRange, 0, "ndis5"
+HKR, Ndi\Interfaces, LowerRange, 0, "ethernet"
+
+[RNDIS_EventLog]
+AddReg = RNDIS_EventLog_AddReg
+
+[RNDIS_EventLog_AddReg]
+HKR, , EventMessageFile, 0x00020000, "%%SystemRoot%%\System32\netevent.dll"
+HKR, , TypesSupported, 0x00010001, 7
+
+; Common Sections -------------------------------------------------
+
+[RNDIS_AddReg_Common]
+HKR, NDI\params\NetworkAddress, ParamDesc, 0, %NetworkAddress%
+HKR, NDI\params\NetworkAddress, type, 0, "edit"
+HKR, NDI\params\NetworkAddress, LimitText, 0, "12"
+HKR, NDI\params\NetworkAddress, UpperCase, 0, "1"
+HKR, NDI\params\NetworkAddress, default, 0, " "
+HKR, NDI\params\NetworkAddress, optional, 0, "1"
+
+[SourceDisksNames]
+1=%SourceDisk%,,1
+
+[SourceDisksFiles]
+usb8023m.sys=1
+rndismpm.sys=1
+usb8023w.sys=1
+rndismpw.sys=1
+usb8023k.sys=1
+rndismpk.sys=1
+
+[DestinationDirs]
+RNDIS_CopyFiles_98 = 10, system32/drivers
+RNDIS_CopyFiles_ME = 10, system32/drivers
+RNDIS_CopyFiles_NT = 12
+
+[Strings]
+ServiceDisplayName = "USB Remote NDIS Network Device Driver"
+NetworkAddress = "Network Address"
+Linux = "Linux Developer Community"
+LinuxDevice = "Linux USB Ethernet/RNDIS Gadget"
+SourceDisk = "Ethernet/RNDIS Gadget Driver Install Disk"
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/mtouchusb.txt b/Documentation/usb/mtouchusb.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..cd806bfc8b8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/mtouchusb.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,76 @@
+CHANGES
+
+- 0.3 - Created based off of scanner & INSTALL from the original touchscreen
+ driver on freshmeat (http://freshmeat.net/projects/3mtouchscreendriver)
+- Amended for linux-2.4.18, then 2.4.19
+
+- 0.5 - Complete rewrite using Linux Input in 2.6.3
+ Unfortunately no calibration support at this time
+
+- 1.4 - Multiple changes to support the EXII 5000UC and house cleaning
+ Changed reset from standard USB dev reset to vendor reset
+ Changed data sent to host from compensated to raw coordinates
+ Eliminated vendor/product module params
+ Performed multiple successfull tests with an EXII-5010UC
+
+SUPPORTED HARDWARE:
+
+ All controllers have the Vendor: 0x0596 & Product: 0x0001
+
+
+ Controller Description Part Number
+ ------------------------------------------------------
+
+ USB Capacitive - Pearl Case 14-205 (Discontinued)
+ USB Capacitive - Black Case 14-124 (Discontinued)
+ USB Capacitive - No Case 14-206 (Discontinued)
+
+ USB Capacitive - Pearl Case EXII-5010UC
+ USB Capacitive - Black Case EXII-5030UC
+ USB Capacitive - No Case EXII-5050UC
+
+DRIVER NOTES:
+
+Installation is simple, you only need to add Linux Input, Linux USB, and the
+driver to the kernel. The driver can also be optionally built as a module.
+
+This driver appears to be one of possible 2 Linux USB Input Touchscreen
+drivers. Although 3M produces a binary only driver available for
+download, I persist in updating this driver since I would like to use the
+touchscreen for embedded apps using QTEmbedded, DirectFB, etc. So I feel the
+logical choice is to use Linux Imput.
+
+Currently there is no way to calibrate the device via this driver. Even if
+the device could be calibrated, the driver pulls to raw coordinate data from
+the controller. This means calibration must be performed within the
+userspace.
+
+The controller screen resolution is now 0 to 16384 for both X and Y reporting
+the raw touch data. This is the same for the old and new capacitive USB
+controllers.
+
+Perhaps at some point an abstract function will be placed into evdev so
+generic functions like calibrations, resets, and vendor information can be
+requested from the userspace (And the drivers would handle the vendor specific
+tasks).
+
+ADDITIONAL INFORMATION/UPDATES/X CONFIGURATION EXAMPLE:
+
+http://groomlakelabs.com/grandamp/code/microtouch/
+
+TODO:
+
+Implement a control urb again to handle requests to and from the device
+such as calibration, etc once/if it becomes available.
+
+DISCLAMER:
+
+I am not a MicroTouch/3M employee, nor have I ever been. 3M does not support
+this driver! If you want touch drivers only supported within X, please go to:
+
+http://www.3m.com/3MTouchSystems/downloads/
+
+THANKS:
+
+A huge thank you to 3M Touch Systems for the EXII-5010UC controllers for
+testing!
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/ohci.txt b/Documentation/usb/ohci.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..99320d9fa52
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/ohci.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,32 @@
+23-Aug-2002
+
+The "ohci-hcd" driver is a USB Host Controller Driver (HCD) that is derived
+from the "usb-ohci" driver from the 2.4 kernel series. The "usb-ohci" code
+was written primarily by Roman Weissgaerber <weissg@vienna.at> but with
+contributions from many others (read its copyright/licencing header).
+
+It supports the "Open Host Controller Interface" (OHCI), which standardizes
+hardware register protocols used to talk to USB 1.1 host controllers. As
+compared to the earlier "Universal Host Controller Interface" (UHCI) from
+Intel, it pushes more intelligence into the hardware. USB 1.1 controllers
+from vendors other than Intel and VIA generally use OHCI.
+
+Changes since the 2.4 kernel include
+
+ - improved robustness; bugfixes; and less overhead
+ - supports the updated and simplified usbcore APIs
+ - interrupt transfers can be larger, and can be queued
+ - less code, by using the upper level "hcd" framework
+ - supports some non-PCI implementations of OHCI
+ - ... more
+
+The "ohci-hcd" driver handles all USB 1.1 transfer types. Transfers of all
+types can be queued. That was also true in "usb-ohci", except for interrupt
+transfers. Previously, using periods of one frame would risk data loss due
+to overhead in IRQ processing. When interrupt transfers are queued, those
+risks can be minimized by making sure the hardware always has transfers to
+work on while the OS is getting around to the relevant IRQ processing.
+
+- David Brownell
+ <dbrownell@users.sourceforge.net>
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/ov511.txt b/Documentation/usb/ov511.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..e1974ec8217
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/ov511.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,289 @@
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Readme for Linux device driver for the OmniVision OV511 USB to camera bridge IC
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Author: Mark McClelland
+Homepage: http://alpha.dyndns.org/ov511
+
+INTRODUCTION:
+
+This is a driver for the OV511, a USB-only chip used in many "webcam" devices.
+Any camera using the OV511/OV511+ and the OV6620/OV7610/20/20AE should work.
+Video capture devices that use the Philips SAA7111A decoder also work. It
+supports streaming and capture of color or monochrome video via the Video4Linux
+API. Most V4L apps are compatible with it. Most resolutions with a width and
+height that are a multiple of 8 are supported.
+
+If you need more information, please visit the OV511 homepage at the above URL.
+
+WHAT YOU NEED:
+
+- If you want to help with the development, get the chip's specification docs at
+ http://www.ovt.com/omniusbp.html
+
+- A Video4Linux compatible frame grabber program (I recommend vidcat and xawtv)
+ vidcat is part of the w3cam package: http://www.hdk-berlin.de/~rasca/w3cam/
+ xawtv is available at: http://www.in-berlin.de/User/kraxel/xawtv.html
+
+HOW TO USE IT:
+
+Note: These are simplified instructions. For complete instructions see:
+ http://alpha.dyndns.org/ov511/install.html
+
+You must have first compiled USB support, support for your specific USB host
+controller (UHCI or OHCI), and Video4Linux support for your kernel (I recommend
+making them modules.) Make sure "Enforce bandwidth allocation" is NOT enabled.
+
+Next, (as root):
+
+ modprobe usbcore
+ modprobe usb-uhci <OR> modprobe usb-ohci
+ modprobe videodev
+ modprobe ov511
+
+If it is not already there (it usually is), create the video device:
+
+ mknod /dev/video0 c 81 0
+
+Optionally, symlink /dev/video to /dev/video0
+
+You will have to set permissions on this device to allow you to read/write
+from it:
+
+ chmod 666 /dev/video
+ chmod 666 /dev/video0 (if necessary)
+
+Now you are ready to run a video app! Both vidcat and xawtv work well for me
+at 640x480.
+
+[Using vidcat:]
+
+ vidcat -s 640x480 -p c > test.jpg
+ xview test.jpg
+
+[Using xawtv:]
+
+From the main xawtv directory:
+
+ make clean
+ ./configure
+ make
+ make install
+
+Now you should be able to run xawtv. Right click for the options dialog.
+
+MODULE PARAMETERS:
+
+ You can set these with: insmod ov511 NAME=VALUE
+ There is currently no way to set these on a per-camera basis.
+
+ NAME: autobright
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 1
+ DESC: Brightness is normally under automatic control and can't be set
+ manually by the video app. Set to 0 for manual control.
+
+ NAME: autogain
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 1
+ DESC: Auto Gain Control enable. This feature is not yet implemented.
+
+ NAME: autoexp
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 1
+ DESC: Auto Exposure Control enable. This feature is not yet implemented.
+
+ NAME: debug
+ TYPE: integer (0-6)
+ DEFAULT: 3
+ DESC: Sets the threshold for printing debug messages. The higher the value,
+ the more is printed. The levels are cumulative, and are as follows:
+ 0=no debug messages
+ 1=init/detection/unload and other significant messages
+ 2=some warning messages
+ 3=config/control function calls
+ 4=most function calls and data parsing messages
+ 5=highly repetitive mesgs
+
+ NAME: snapshot
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: Set to 1 to enable snapshot mode. read()/VIDIOCSYNC will block until
+ the snapshot button is pressed. Note: enabling this mode disables
+ /proc/video/ov511/<minor#>/button
+
+ NAME: cams
+ TYPE: integer (1-4 for OV511, 1-31 for OV511+)
+ DEFAULT: 1
+ DESC: Number of cameras allowed to stream simultaneously on a single bus.
+ Values higher than 1 reduce the data rate of each camera, allowing two
+ or more to be used at once. If you have a complicated setup involving
+ both OV511 and OV511+ cameras, trial-and-error may be necessary for
+ finding the optimum setting.
+
+ NAME: compress
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: Set this to 1 to turn on the camera's compression engine. This can
+ potentially increase the frame rate at the expense of quality, if you
+ have a fast CPU. You must load the proper compression module for your
+ camera before starting your application (ov511_decomp or ov518_decomp).
+
+ NAME: testpat
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: This configures the camera's sensor to transmit a colored test-pattern
+ instead of an image. This does not work correctly yet.
+
+ NAME: dumppix
+ TYPE: integer (0-2)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: Dumps raw pixel data and skips post-processing and format conversion.
+ It is for debugging purposes only. Options are:
+ 0: Disable (default)
+ 1: Dump raw data from camera, excluding headers and trailers
+ 2: Dumps data exactly as received from camera
+
+ NAME: led
+ TYPE: integer (0-2)
+ DEFAULT: 1 (Always on)
+ DESC: Controls whether the LED (the little light) on the front of the camera
+ is always off (0), always on (1), or only on when driver is open (2).
+ This is not supported with the OV511, and might only work with certain
+ cameras (ones that actually have the LED wired to the control pin, and
+ not just hard-wired to be on all the time).
+
+ NAME: dump_bridge
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: Dumps the bridge (OV511[+] or OV518[+]) register values to the system
+ log. Only useful for serious debugging/development purposes.
+
+ NAME: dump_sensor
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: Dumps the sensor register values to the system log. Only useful for
+ serious debugging/development purposes.
+
+ NAME: printph
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0
+ DESC: Setting this to 1 will dump the first 12 bytes of each isoc frame. This
+ is only useful if you are trying to debug problems with the isoc data
+ stream (i.e.: camera initializes, but vidcat hangs until Ctrl-C). Be
+ warned that this dumps a large number of messages to your kernel log.
+
+ NAME: phy, phuv, pvy, pvuv, qhy, qhuv, qvy, qvuv
+ TYPE: integer (0-63 for phy and phuv, 0-255 for rest)
+ DEFAULT: OV511 default values
+ DESC: These are registers 70h - 77h of the OV511, which control the
+ prediction ranges and quantization thresholds of the compressor, for
+ the Y and UV channels in the horizontal and vertical directions. See
+ the OV511 or OV511+ data sheet for more detailed descriptions. These
+ normally do not need to be changed.
+
+ NAME: lightfreq
+ TYPE: integer (0, 50, or 60)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (use sensor default)
+ DESC: Sets the sensor to match your lighting frequency. This can reduce the
+ appearance of "banding", i.e. horizontal lines or waves of light and
+ dark that are often caused by artificial lighting. Valid values are:
+ 0 - Use default (depends on sensor, most likely 60 Hz)
+ 50 - For European and Asian 50 Hz power
+ 60 - For American 60 Hz power
+
+ NAME: bandingfilter
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (off)
+ DESC: Enables the sensor´s banding filter exposure algorithm. This reduces
+ or stabilizes the "banding" caused by some artificial light sources
+ (especially fluorescent). You might have to set lightfreq correctly for
+ this to work right. As an added bonus, this sometimes makes it
+ possible to capture your monitor´s output.
+
+ NAME: fastset
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (off)
+ DESC: Allows picture settings (brightness, contrast, color, and hue) to take
+ effect immediately, even in the middle of a frame. This reduces the
+ time to change settings, but can ruin frames during the change. Only
+ affects OmniVision sensors.
+
+ NAME: force_palette
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (off)
+ DESC: Forces the palette (color format) to a specific value. If an
+ application requests a different palette, it will be rejected, thereby
+ forcing it to try others until it succeeds. This is useful for forcing
+ greyscale mode with a color camera, for example. Supported modes are:
+ 0 (Allows all the following formats)
+ 1 VIDEO_PALETTE_GREY (Linear greyscale)
+ 10 VIDEO_PALETTE_YUV420 (YUV 4:2:0 Planar)
+ 15 VIDEO_PALETTE_YUV420P (YUV 4:2:0 Planar, same as 10)
+
+ NAME: backlight
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (off)
+ DESC: Setting this flag changes the exposure algorithm for OmniVision sensors
+ such that objects in the camera's view (i.e. your head) can be clearly
+ seen when they are illuminated from behind. It reduces or eliminates
+ the sensor's auto-exposure function, so it should only be used when
+ needed. Additionally, it is only supported with the OV6620 and OV7620.
+
+ NAME: unit_video
+ TYPE: Up to 16 comma-separated integers
+ DEFAULT: 0,0,0... (automatically assign the next available minor(s))
+ DESC: You can specify up to 16 minor numbers to be assigned to ov511 devices.
+ For example, "unit_video=1,3" will make the driver use /dev/video1 and
+ /dev/video3 for the first two devices it detects. Additional devices
+ will be assigned automatically starting at the first available device
+ node (/dev/video0 in this case). Note that you cannot specify 0 as a
+ minor number. This feature requires kernel version 2.4.5 or higher.
+
+ NAME: remove_zeros
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (do not skip any incoming data)
+ DESC: Setting this to 1 will remove zero-padding from incoming data. This
+ will compensate for the blocks of corruption that can appear when the
+ camera cannot keep up with the speed of the USB bus (eg. at low frame
+ resolutions). This feature is always enabled when compression is on.
+
+ NAME: mirror
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (off)
+ DESC: Setting this to 1 will reverse ("mirror") the image horizontally. This
+ might be necessary if your camera has a custom lens assembly. This has
+ no effect with video capture devices.
+
+ NAME: ov518_color
+ TYPE: integer (Boolean)
+ DEFAULT: 0 (off)
+ DESC: Enable OV518 color support. This is off by default since it doesn't
+ work most of the time. If you want to try it, you must also load
+ ov518_decomp with the "nouv=0" parameter. If you get improper colors or
+ diagonal lines through the image, restart your video app and try again.
+ Repeat as necessary.
+
+WORKING FEATURES:
+ o Color streaming/capture at most widths and heights that are multiples of 8.
+ o Monochrome (use force_palette=1 to enable)
+ o Setting/getting of saturation, contrast, brightness, and hue (only some of
+ them work the OV7620 and OV7620AE)
+ o /proc status reporting
+ o SAA7111A video capture support at 320x240 and 640x480
+ o Compression support
+ o SMP compatibility
+
+HOW TO CONTACT ME:
+
+You can email me at mark@alpha.dyndns.org . Please prefix the subject line
+with "OV511: " so that I am certain to notice your message.
+
+CREDITS:
+
+The code is based in no small part on the CPiA driver by Johannes Erdfelt,
+Randy Dunlap, and others. Big thanks to them for their pioneering work on that
+and the USB stack. Thanks to Bret Wallach for getting camera reg IO, ISOC, and
+image capture working. Thanks to Orion Sky Lawlor, Kevin Moore, and Claudio
+Matsuoka for their work as well.
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/proc_usb_info.txt b/Documentation/usb/proc_usb_info.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..729c72d34c8
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/proc_usb_info.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,371 @@
+/proc/bus/usb filesystem output
+===============================
+(version 2003.05.30)
+
+
+The usbfs filesystem for USB devices is traditionally mounted at
+/proc/bus/usb. It provides the /proc/bus/usb/devices file, as well as
+the /proc/bus/usb/BBB/DDD files.
+
+
+**NOTE**: If /proc/bus/usb appears empty, and a host controller
+ driver has been linked, then you need to mount the
+ filesystem. Issue the command (as root):
+
+ mount -t usbfs none /proc/bus/usb
+
+ An alternative and more permanent method would be to add
+
+ none /proc/bus/usb usbfs defaults 0 0
+
+ to /etc/fstab. This will mount usbfs at each reboot.
+ You can then issue `cat /proc/bus/usb/devices` to extract
+ USB device information, and user mode drivers can use usbfs
+ to interact with USB devices.
+
+ There are a number of mount options supported by usbfs.
+ Consult the source code (linux/drivers/usb/core/inode.c) for
+ information about those options.
+
+**NOTE**: The filesystem has been renamed from "usbdevfs" to
+ "usbfs", to reduce confusion with "devfs". You may
+ still see references to the older "usbdevfs" name.
+
+For more information on mounting the usbfs file system, see the
+"USB Device Filesystem" section of the USB Guide. The latest copy
+of the USB Guide can be found at http://www.linux-usb.org/
+
+
+THE /proc/bus/usb/BBB/DDD FILES:
+--------------------------------
+Each connected USB device has one file. The BBB indicates the bus
+number. The DDD indicates the device address on that bus. Both
+of these numbers are assigned sequentially, and can be reused, so
+you can't rely on them for stable access to devices. For example,
+it's relatively common for devices to re-enumerate while they are
+still connected (perhaps someone jostled their power supply, hub,
+or USB cable), so a device might be 002/027 when you first connect
+it and 002/048 sometime later.
+
+These files can be read as binary data. The binary data consists
+of first the device descriptor, then the descriptors for each
+configuration of the device. That information is also shown in
+text form by the /proc/bus/usb/devices file, described later.
+
+These files may also be used to write user-level drivers for the USB
+devices. You would open the /proc/bus/usb/BBB/DDD file read/write,
+read its descriptors to make sure it's the device you expect, and then
+bind to an interface (or perhaps several) using an ioctl call. You
+would issue more ioctls to the device to communicate to it using
+control, bulk, or other kinds of USB transfers. The IOCTLs are
+listed in the <linux/usbdevice_fs.h> file, and at this writing the
+source code (linux/drivers/usb/devio.c) is the primary reference
+for how to access devices through those files.
+
+Note that since by default these BBB/DDD files are writable only by
+root, only root can write such user mode drivers. You can selectively
+grant read/write permissions to other users by using "chmod". Also,
+usbfs mount options such as "devmode=0666" may be helpful.
+
+
+
+THE /proc/bus/usb/devices FILE:
+-------------------------------
+In /proc/bus/usb/devices, each device's output has multiple
+lines of ASCII output.
+I made it ASCII instead of binary on purpose, so that someone
+can obtain some useful data from it without the use of an
+auxiliary program. However, with an auxiliary program, the numbers
+in the first 4 columns of each "T:" line (topology info:
+Lev, Prnt, Port, Cnt) can be used to build a USB topology diagram.
+
+Each line is tagged with a one-character ID for that line:
+
+T = Topology (etc.)
+B = Bandwidth (applies only to USB host controllers, which are
+ virtualized as root hubs)
+D = Device descriptor info.
+P = Product ID info. (from Device descriptor, but they won't fit
+ together on one line)
+S = String descriptors.
+C = Configuration descriptor info. (* = active configuration)
+I = Interface descriptor info.
+E = Endpoint descriptor info.
+
+=======================================================================
+
+/proc/bus/usb/devices output format:
+
+Legend:
+ d = decimal number (may have leading spaces or 0's)
+ x = hexadecimal number (may have leading spaces or 0's)
+ s = string
+
+
+Topology info:
+
+T: Bus=dd Lev=dd Prnt=dd Port=dd Cnt=dd Dev#=ddd Spd=ddd MxCh=dd
+| | | | | | | | |__MaxChildren
+| | | | | | | |__Device Speed in Mbps
+| | | | | | |__DeviceNumber
+| | | | | |__Count of devices at this level
+| | | | |__Connector/Port on Parent for this device
+| | | |__Parent DeviceNumber
+| | |__Level in topology for this bus
+| |__Bus number
+|__Topology info tag
+
+ Speed may be:
+ 1.5 Mbit/s for low speed USB
+ 12 Mbit/s for full speed USB
+ 480 Mbit/s for high speed USB (added for USB 2.0)
+
+
+Bandwidth info:
+B: Alloc=ddd/ddd us (xx%), #Int=ddd, #Iso=ddd
+| | | |__Number of isochronous requests
+| | |__Number of interrupt requests
+| |__Total Bandwidth allocated to this bus
+|__Bandwidth info tag
+
+ Bandwidth allocation is an approximation of how much of one frame
+ (millisecond) is in use. It reflects only periodic transfers, which
+ are the only transfers that reserve bandwidth. Control and bulk
+ transfers use all other bandwidth, including reserved bandwidth that
+ is not used for transfers (such as for short packets).
+
+ The percentage is how much of the "reserved" bandwidth is scheduled by
+ those transfers. For a low or full speed bus (loosely, "USB 1.1"),
+ 90% of the bus bandwidth is reserved. For a high speed bus (loosely,
+ "USB 2.0") 80% is reserved.
+
+
+Device descriptor info & Product ID info:
+
+D: Ver=x.xx Cls=xx(s) Sub=xx Prot=xx MxPS=dd #Cfgs=dd
+P: Vendor=xxxx ProdID=xxxx Rev=xx.xx
+
+where
+D: Ver=x.xx Cls=xx(sssss) Sub=xx Prot=xx MxPS=dd #Cfgs=dd
+| | | | | | |__NumberConfigurations
+| | | | | |__MaxPacketSize of Default Endpoint
+| | | | |__DeviceProtocol
+| | | |__DeviceSubClass
+| | |__DeviceClass
+| |__Device USB version
+|__Device info tag #1
+
+where
+P: Vendor=xxxx ProdID=xxxx Rev=xx.xx
+| | | |__Product revision number
+| | |__Product ID code
+| |__Vendor ID code
+|__Device info tag #2
+
+
+String descriptor info:
+
+S: Manufacturer=ssss
+| |__Manufacturer of this device as read from the device.
+| For USB host controller drivers (virtual root hubs) this may
+| be omitted, or (for newer drivers) will identify the kernel
+| version and the driver which provides this hub emulation.
+|__String info tag
+
+S: Product=ssss
+| |__Product description of this device as read from the device.
+| For older USB host controller drivers (virtual root hubs) this
+| indicates the driver; for newer ones, it's a product (and vendor)
+| description that often comes from the kernel's PCI ID database.
+|__String info tag
+
+S: SerialNumber=ssss
+| |__Serial Number of this device as read from the device.
+| For USB host controller drivers (virtual root hubs) this is
+| some unique ID, normally a bus ID (address or slot name) that
+| can't be shared with any other device.
+|__String info tag
+
+
+
+Configuration descriptor info:
+
+C:* #Ifs=dd Cfg#=dd Atr=xx MPwr=dddmA
+| | | | | |__MaxPower in mA
+| | | | |__Attributes
+| | | |__ConfiguratioNumber
+| | |__NumberOfInterfaces
+| |__ "*" indicates the active configuration (others are " ")
+|__Config info tag
+
+ USB devices may have multiple configurations, each of which act
+ rather differently. For example, a bus-powered configuration
+ might be much less capable than one that is self-powered. Only
+ one device configuration can be active at a time; most devices
+ have only one configuration.
+
+ Each configuration consists of one or more interfaces. Each
+ interface serves a distinct "function", which is typically bound
+ to a different USB device driver. One common example is a USB
+ speaker with an audio interface for playback, and a HID interface
+ for use with software volume control.
+
+
+Interface descriptor info (can be multiple per Config):
+
+I: If#=dd Alt=dd #EPs=dd Cls=xx(sssss) Sub=xx Prot=xx Driver=ssss
+| | | | | | | |__Driver name
+| | | | | | | or "(none)"
+| | | | | | |__InterfaceProtocol
+| | | | | |__InterfaceSubClass
+| | | | |__InterfaceClass
+| | | |__NumberOfEndpoints
+| | |__AlternateSettingNumber
+| |__InterfaceNumber
+|__Interface info tag
+
+ A given interface may have one or more "alternate" settings.
+ For example, default settings may not use more than a small
+ amount of periodic bandwidth. To use significant fractions
+ of bus bandwidth, drivers must select a non-default altsetting.
+
+ Only one setting for an interface may be active at a time, and
+ only one driver may bind to an interface at a time. Most devices
+ have only one alternate setting per interface.
+
+
+Endpoint descriptor info (can be multiple per Interface):
+
+E: Ad=xx(s) Atr=xx(ssss) MxPS=dddd Ivl=dddss
+| | | | |__Interval (max) between transfers
+| | | |__EndpointMaxPacketSize
+| | |__Attributes(EndpointType)
+| |__EndpointAddress(I=In,O=Out)
+|__Endpoint info tag
+
+ The interval is nonzero for all periodic (interrupt or isochronous)
+ endpoints. For high speed endpoints the transfer interval may be
+ measured in microseconds rather than milliseconds.
+
+ For high speed periodic endpoints, the "MaxPacketSize" reflects
+ the per-microframe data transfer size. For "high bandwidth"
+ endpoints, that can reflect two or three packets (for up to
+ 3KBytes every 125 usec) per endpoint.
+
+ With the Linux-USB stack, periodic bandwidth reservations use the
+ transfer intervals and sizes provided by URBs, which can be less
+ than those found in endpoint descriptor.
+
+
+=======================================================================
+
+
+If a user or script is interested only in Topology info, for
+example, use something like "grep ^T: /proc/bus/usb/devices"
+for only the Topology lines. A command like
+"grep -i ^[tdp]: /proc/bus/usb/devices" can be used to list
+only the lines that begin with the characters in square brackets,
+where the valid characters are TDPCIE. With a slightly more able
+script, it can display any selected lines (for example, only T, D,
+and P lines) and change their output format. (The "procusb"
+Perl script is the beginning of this idea. It will list only
+selected lines [selected from TBDPSCIE] or "All" lines from
+/proc/bus/usb/devices.)
+
+The Topology lines can be used to generate a graphic/pictorial
+of the USB devices on a system's root hub. (See more below
+on how to do this.)
+
+The Interface lines can be used to determine what driver is
+being used for each device.
+
+The Configuration lines could be used to list maximum power
+(in milliamps) that a system's USB devices are using.
+For example, "grep ^C: /proc/bus/usb/devices".
+
+
+Here's an example, from a system which has a UHCI root hub,
+an external hub connected to the root hub, and a mouse and
+a serial converter connected to the external hub.
+
+T: Bus=00 Lev=00 Prnt=00 Port=00 Cnt=00 Dev#= 1 Spd=12 MxCh= 2
+B: Alloc= 28/900 us ( 3%), #Int= 2, #Iso= 0
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0000 ProdID=0000 Rev= 0.00
+S: Product=USB UHCI Root Hub
+S: SerialNumber=dce0
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=40 MxPwr= 0mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=hub
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 8 Ivl=255ms
+T: Bus=00 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 2 Spd=12 MxCh= 4
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0451 ProdID=1446 Rev= 1.00
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=e0 MxPwr=100mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=hub
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 1 Ivl=255ms
+T: Bus=00 Lev=02 Prnt=02 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 3 Spd=1.5 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=00(>ifc ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=04b4 ProdID=0001 Rev= 0.00
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=80 MxPwr=100mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=03(HID ) Sub=01 Prot=02 Driver=mouse
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 3 Ivl= 10ms
+T: Bus=00 Lev=02 Prnt=02 Port=02 Cnt=02 Dev#= 4 Spd=12 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 1.00 Cls=00(>ifc ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0565 ProdID=0001 Rev= 1.08
+S: Manufacturer=Peracom Networks, Inc.
+S: Product=Peracom USB to Serial Converter
+C:* #Ifs= 1 Cfg#= 1 Atr=a0 MxPwr=100mA
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 3 Cls=00(>ifc ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=serial
+E: Ad=81(I) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 64 Ivl= 16ms
+E: Ad=01(O) Atr=02(Bulk) MxPS= 16 Ivl= 16ms
+E: Ad=82(I) Atr=03(Int.) MxPS= 8 Ivl= 8ms
+
+
+Selecting only the "T:" and "I:" lines from this (for example, by using
+"procusb ti"), we have:
+
+T: Bus=00 Lev=00 Prnt=00 Port=00 Cnt=00 Dev#= 1 Spd=12 MxCh= 2
+T: Bus=00 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 2 Spd=12 MxCh= 4
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=09(hub ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=hub
+T: Bus=00 Lev=02 Prnt=02 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 3 Spd=1.5 MxCh= 0
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 1 Cls=03(HID ) Sub=01 Prot=02 Driver=mouse
+T: Bus=00 Lev=02 Prnt=02 Port=02 Cnt=02 Dev#= 4 Spd=12 MxCh= 0
+I: If#= 0 Alt= 0 #EPs= 3 Cls=00(>ifc ) Sub=00 Prot=00 Driver=serial
+
+
+Physically this looks like (or could be converted to):
+
+ +------------------+
+ | PC/root_hub (12)| Dev# = 1
+ +------------------+ (nn) is Mbps.
+ Level 0 | CN.0 | CN.1 | [CN = connector/port #]
+ +------------------+
+ /
+ /
+ +-----------------------+
+ Level 1 | Dev#2: 4-port hub (12)|
+ +-----------------------+
+ |CN.0 |CN.1 |CN.2 |CN.3 |
+ +-----------------------+
+ \ \____________________
+ \_____ \
+ \ \
+ +--------------------+ +--------------------+
+ Level 2 | Dev# 3: mouse (1.5)| | Dev# 4: serial (12)|
+ +--------------------+ +--------------------+
+
+
+
+Or, in a more tree-like structure (ports [Connectors] without
+connections could be omitted):
+
+PC: Dev# 1, root hub, 2 ports, 12 Mbps
+|_ CN.0: Dev# 2, hub, 4 ports, 12 Mbps
+ |_ CN.0: Dev #3, mouse, 1.5 Mbps
+ |_ CN.1:
+ |_ CN.2: Dev #4, serial, 12 Mbps
+ |_ CN.3:
+|_ CN.1:
+
+
+ ### END ###
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/rio.txt b/Documentation/usb/rio.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..0aa79ab0088
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/rio.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,138 @@
+Copyright (C) 1999, 2000 Bruce Tenison
+Portions Copyright (C) 1999, 2000 David Nelson
+Thanks to David Nelson for guidance and the usage of the scanner.txt
+and scanner.c files to model our driver and this informative file.
+
+Mar. 2, 2000
+
+CHANGES
+
+- Initial Revision
+
+
+OVERVIEW
+
+This README will address issues regarding how to configure the kernel
+to access a RIO 500 mp3 player.
+Before I explain how to use this to access the Rio500 please be warned:
+
+W A R N I N G:
+--------------
+
+Please note that this software is still under development. The authors
+are in no way responsible for any damage that may occur, no matter how
+inconsequential.
+
+It seems that the Rio has a problem when sending .mp3 with low batteries.
+I suggest when the batteries are low and want to transfer stuff that you
+replace it with a fresh one. In my case, what happened is I lost two 16kb
+blocks (they are no longer usable to store information to it). But I don't
+know if thats normal or not. It could simply be a problem with the flash
+memory.
+
+In an extreme case, I left my Rio playing overnight and the batteries wore
+down to nothing and appear to have corrupted the flash memory. My RIO
+needed to be replaced as a result. Diamond tech support is aware of the
+problem. Do NOT allow your batteries to wear down to nothing before
+changing them. It appears RIO 500 firmware does not handle low battery
+power well at all.
+
+On systems with OHCI controllers, the kernel OHCI code appears to have
+power on problems with some chipsets. If you are having problems
+connecting to your RIO 500, try turning it on first and then plugging it
+into the USB cable.
+
+Contact information:
+--------------------
+
+ The main page for the project is hosted at sourceforge.net in the following
+ address: http://rio500.sourceforge.net You can also go to the sourceforge
+ project page at: http://sourceforge.net/project/?group_id=1944 There is
+ also a mailing list: rio500-users@lists.sourceforge.net
+
+Authors:
+-------
+
+Most of the code was written by Cesar Miquel <miquel@df.uba.ar>. Keith
+Clayton <kclayton@jps.net> is incharge of the PPC port and making sure
+things work there. Bruce Tenison <btenison@dibbs.net> is adding support
+for .fon files and also does testing. The program will mostly sure be
+re-written and Pete Ikusz along with the rest will re-design it. I would
+also like to thank Tri Nguyen <tmn_3022000@hotmail.com> who provided use
+with some important information regarding the communication with the Rio.
+
+ADDITIONAL INFORMATION and Userspace tools
+
+http://rio500.sourceforge.net/
+
+
+REQUIREMENTS
+
+A host with a USB port. Ideally, either a UHCI (Intel) or OHCI
+(Compaq and others) hardware port should work.
+
+A Linux development kernel (2.3.x) with USB support enabled or a
+backported version to linux-2.2.x. See http://www.linux-usb.org for
+more information on accomplishing this.
+
+A Linux kernel with RIO 500 support enabled.
+
+'lspci' which is only needed to determine the type of USB hardware
+available in your machine.
+
+CONFIGURATION
+
+Using `lspci -v`, determine the type of USB hardware available.
+
+ If you see something like:
+
+ USB Controller: ......
+ Flags: .....
+ I/O ports at ....
+
+ Then you have a UHCI based controller.
+
+ If you see something like:
+
+ USB Controller: .....
+ Flags: ....
+ Memory at .....
+
+ Then you have a OHCI based controller.
+
+Using `make menuconfig` or your preferred method for configuring the
+kernel, select 'Support for USB', 'OHCI/UHCI' depending on your
+hardware (determined from the steps above), 'USB Diamond Rio500 support', and
+'Preliminary USB device filesystem'. Compile and install the modules
+(you may need to execute `depmod -a` to update the module
+dependencies).
+
+Add a device for the USB rio500:
+ `mknod /dev/usb/rio500 c 180 64`
+
+Set appropriate permissions for /dev/usb/rio500 (don't forget about
+group and world permissions). Both read and write permissions are
+required for proper operation.
+
+Load the appropriate modules (if compiled as modules):
+
+ OHCI:
+ modprobe usbcore
+ modprobe usb-ohci
+ modprobe rio500
+
+ UHCI:
+ modprobe usbcore
+ modprobe usb-uhci (or uhci)
+ modprobe rio500
+
+That's it. The Rio500 Utils at: http://rio500.sourceforge.net should
+be able to access the rio500.
+
+BUGS
+
+If you encounter any problems feel free to drop me an email.
+
+Bruce Tenison
+btenison@dibbs.net
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/se401.txt b/Documentation/usb/se401.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..7b9d1c960a1
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/se401.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,54 @@
+Linux driver for SE401 based USB cameras
+
+Copyright, 2001, Jeroen Vreeken
+
+
+INTRODUCTION:
+
+The SE401 chip is the used in low-cost usb webcams.
+It is produced by Endpoints Inc. (www.endpoints.com).
+It interfaces directly to a cmos image sensor and USB. The only other major
+part in a se401 based camera is a dram chip.
+
+The following cameras are known to work with this driver:
+
+Aox se401 (non-branded) cameras
+Philips PVCV665 USB VGA webcam 'Vesta Fun'
+Kensington VideoCAM PC Camera Model 67014
+Kensington VideoCAM PC Camera Model 67015
+Kensington VideoCAM PC Camera Model 67016
+Kensington VideoCAM PC Camera Model 67017
+
+
+WHAT YOU NEED:
+
+- USB support
+- VIDEO4LINUX support
+
+More information about USB support for linux can be found at:
+http://www.linux-usb.org
+
+
+MODULE OPTIONS:
+
+When the driver is compiled as a module you can also use the 'flickerless'
+option. With it exposure is limited to values that do not interfere with the
+net frequency. Valid options for this option are 0, 50 and 60. (0=disable,
+50=50hz, 60=60hz)
+
+
+KNOWN PROBLEMS:
+
+The driver works fine with the usb-ohci and uhci host controller drivers,
+the default settings also work with usb-uhci. But sending more than one bulk
+transfer at a time with usb-uhci doesn't work yet.
+Users of usb-ohci and uhci can safely enlarge SE401_NUMSBUF in se401.h in
+order to increase the throughput (and thus framerate).
+
+
+HELP:
+
+The latest info on this driver can be found at:
+http://www.chello.nl/~j.vreeken/se401/
+And questions to me can be send to:
+pe1rxq@amsat.org
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/sn9c102.txt b/Documentation/usb/sn9c102.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..cf9a1187edc
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/sn9c102.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,480 @@
+
+ SN9C10x PC Camera Controllers
+ Driver for Linux
+ =============================
+
+ - Documentation -
+
+
+Index
+=====
+1. Copyright
+2. Disclaimer
+3. License
+4. Overview and features
+5. Module dependencies
+6. Module loading
+7. Module parameters
+8. Optional device control through "sysfs"
+9. Supported devices
+10. How to add plug-in's for new image sensors
+11. Notes for V4L2 application developers
+12. Video frame formats
+13. Contact information
+14. Credits
+
+
+1. Copyright
+============
+Copyright (C) 2004-2005 by Luca Risolia <luca.risolia@studio.unibo.it>
+
+
+2. Disclaimer
+=============
+SONiX is a trademark of SONiX Technology Company Limited, inc.
+This software is not sponsored or developed by SONiX.
+
+
+3. License
+==========
+This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
+the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
+(at your option) any later version.
+
+This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
+but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
+GNU General Public License for more details.
+
+You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
+Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
+
+
+4. Overview and features
+========================
+This driver attempts to support the video and audio streaming capabilities of
+the devices mounting the SONiX SN9C101, SN9C102 and SN9C103 PC Camera
+Controllers.
+
+It's worth to note that SONiX has never collaborated with the author during the
+development of this project, despite several requests for enough detailed
+specifications of the register tables, compression engine and video data format
+of the above chips. Nevertheless, these informations are no longer necessary,
+becouse all the aspects related to these chips are known and have been
+described in detail in this documentation.
+
+The driver relies on the Video4Linux2 and USB core modules. It has been
+designed to run properly on SMP systems as well.
+
+The latest version of the SN9C10x driver can be found at the following URL:
+http://www.linux-projects.org/
+
+Some of the features of the driver are:
+
+- full compliance with the Video4Linux2 API (see also "Notes for V4L2
+ application developers" paragraph);
+- available mmap or read/poll methods for video streaming through isochronous
+ data transfers;
+- automatic detection of image sensor;
+- support for any window resolutions and optional panning within the maximum
+ pixel area of image sensor;
+- image downscaling with arbitrary scaling factors from 1, 2 and 4 in both
+ directions (see "Notes for V4L2 application developers" paragraph);
+- two different video formats for uncompressed or compressed data in low or
+ high compression quality (see also "Notes for V4L2 application developers"
+ and "Video frame formats" paragraphs);
+- full support for the capabilities of many of the possible image sensors that
+ can be connected to the SN9C10x bridges, including, for istance, red, green,
+ blue and global gain adjustments and exposure (see "Supported devices"
+ paragraph for details);
+- use of default color settings for sunlight conditions;
+- dynamic I/O interface for both SN9C10x and image sensor control and
+ monitoring (see "Optional device control through 'sysfs'" paragraph);
+- dynamic driver control thanks to various module parameters (see "Module
+ parameters" paragraph);
+- up to 64 cameras can be handled at the same time; they can be connected and
+ disconnected from the host many times without turning off the computer, if
+ your system supports hotplugging;
+- no known bugs.
+
+
+5. Module dependencies
+======================
+For it to work properly, the driver needs kernel support for Video4Linux and
+USB.
+
+The following options of the kernel configuration file must be enabled and
+corresponding modules must be compiled:
+
+ # Multimedia devices
+ #
+ CONFIG_VIDEO_DEV=m
+
+ # USB support
+ #
+ CONFIG_USB=m
+
+In addition, depending on the hardware being used, the modules below are
+necessary:
+
+ # USB Host Controller Drivers
+ #
+ CONFIG_USB_EHCI_HCD=m
+ CONFIG_USB_UHCI_HCD=m
+ CONFIG_USB_OHCI_HCD=m
+
+And finally:
+
+ # USB Multimedia devices
+ #
+ CONFIG_USB_SN9C102=m
+
+
+6. Module loading
+=================
+To use the driver, it is necessary to load the "sn9c102" module into memory
+after every other module required: "videodev", "usbcore" and, depending on
+the USB host controller you have, "ehci-hcd", "uhci-hcd" or "ohci-hcd".
+
+Loading can be done as shown below:
+
+ [root@localhost home]# modprobe sn9c102
+
+At this point the devices should be recognized. You can invoke "dmesg" to
+analyze kernel messages and verify that the loading process has gone well:
+
+ [user@localhost home]$ dmesg
+
+
+7. Module parameters
+====================
+Module parameters are listed below:
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: video_nr
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 64)
+Syntax: <-1|n[,...]>
+Description: Specify V4L2 minor mode number:
+ -1 = use next available
+ n = use minor number n
+ You can specify up to 64 cameras this way.
+ For example:
+ video_nr=-1,2,-1 would assign minor number 2 to the second
+ recognized camera and use auto for the first one and for every
+ other camera.
+Default: -1
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: force_munmap;
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 64)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Force the application to unmap previously mapped buffer memory
+ before calling any VIDIOC_S_CROP or VIDIOC_S_FMT ioctl's. Not
+ all the applications support this feature. This parameter is
+ specific for each detected camera.
+ 0 = do not force memory unmapping"
+ 1 = force memory unmapping (save memory)"
+Default: 0
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: debug
+Type: int
+Syntax: <n>
+Description: Debugging information level, from 0 to 3:
+ 0 = none (use carefully)
+ 1 = critical errors
+ 2 = significant informations
+ 3 = more verbose messages
+ Level 3 is useful for testing only, when only one device
+ is used. It also shows some more informations about the
+ hardware being detected. This parameter can be changed at
+ runtime thanks to the /sys filesystem.
+Default: 2
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+
+8. Optional device control through "sysfs" [1]
+==========================================
+It is possible to read and write both the SN9C10x and the image sensor
+registers by using the "sysfs" filesystem interface.
+
+Every time a supported device is recognized, a write-only file named "green" is
+created in the /sys/class/video4linux/videoX directory. You can set the green
+channel's gain by writing the desired value to it. The value may range from 0
+to 15 for SN9C101 or SN9C102 bridges, from 0 to 127 for SN9C103 bridges.
+Similarly, only for SN9C103 controllers, blue and red gain control files are
+available in the same directory, for which accepted values may range from 0 to
+127.
+
+There are other four entries in the directory above for each registered camera:
+"reg", "val", "i2c_reg" and "i2c_val". The first two files control the
+SN9C10x bridge, while the other two control the sensor chip. "reg" and
+"i2c_reg" hold the values of the current register index where the following
+reading/writing operations are addressed at through "val" and "i2c_val". Their
+use is not intended for end-users. Note that "i2c_reg" and "i2c_val" will not
+be created if the sensor does not actually support the standard I2C protocol or
+its registers are not 8-bit long. Also, remember that you must be logged in as
+root before writing to them.
+
+As an example, suppose we were to want to read the value contained in the
+register number 1 of the sensor register table - which is usually the product
+identifier - of the camera registered as "/dev/video0":
+
+ [root@localhost #] cd /sys/class/video4linux/video0
+ [root@localhost #] echo 1 > i2c_reg
+ [root@localhost #] cat i2c_val
+
+Note that "cat" will fail if sensor registers cannot be read.
+
+Now let's set the green gain's register of the SN9C101 or SN9C102 chips to 2:
+
+ [root@localhost #] echo 0x11 > reg
+ [root@localhost #] echo 2 > val
+
+Note that the SN9C10x always returns 0 when some of its registers are read.
+To avoid race conditions, all the I/O accesses to the above files are
+serialized.
+
+The sysfs interface also provides the "frame_header" entry, which exports the
+frame header of the most recent requested and captured video frame. The header
+is 12-bytes long and is appended to every video frame by the SN9C10x
+controllers. As an example, this additional information can be used by the user
+application for implementing auto-exposure features via software.
+
+The following table describes the frame header:
+
+Byte # Value Description
+------ ----- -----------
+0x00 0xFF Frame synchronisation pattern.
+0x01 0xFF Frame synchronisation pattern.
+0x02 0x00 Frame synchronisation pattern.
+0x03 0xC4 Frame synchronisation pattern.
+0x04 0xC4 Frame synchronisation pattern.
+0x05 0x96 Frame synchronisation pattern.
+0x06 0x00 or 0x01 Unknown meaning. The exact value depends on the chip.
+0x07 0xXX Variable value, whose bits are ff00uzzc, where ff is a
+ frame counter, u is unknown, zz is a size indicator
+ (00 = VGA, 01 = SIF, 10 = QSIF) and c stands for
+ "compression enabled" (1 = yes, 0 = no).
+0x08 0xXX Brightness sum inside Auto-Exposure area (low-byte).
+0x09 0xXX Brightness sum inside Auto-Exposure area (high-byte).
+ For a pure white image, this number will be equal to 500
+ times the area of the specified AE area. For images
+ that are not pure white, the value scales down according
+ to relative whiteness.
+0x0A 0xXX Brightness sum outside Auto-Exposure area (low-byte).
+0x0B 0xXX Brightness sum outside Auto-Exposure area (high-byte).
+ For a pure white image, this number will be equal to 125
+ times the area outside of the specified AE area. For
+ images that are not pure white, the value scales down
+ according to relative whiteness.
+
+The AE area (sx, sy, ex, ey) in the active window can be set by programming the
+registers 0x1c, 0x1d, 0x1e and 0x1f of the SN9C10x controllers, where one unit
+corresponds to 32 pixels.
+
+[1] The frame header has been documented by Bertrik Sikken.
+
+
+9. Supported devices
+====================
+None of the names of the companies as well as their products will be mentioned
+here. They have never collaborated with the author, so no advertising.
+
+From the point of view of a driver, what unambiguously identify a device are
+its vendor and product USB identifiers. Below is a list of known identifiers of
+devices mounting the SN9C10x PC camera controllers:
+
+Vendor ID Product ID
+--------- ----------
+0x0c45 0x6001
+0x0c45 0x6005
+0x0c45 0x6009
+0x0c45 0x600d
+0x0c45 0x6024
+0x0c45 0x6025
+0x0c45 0x6028
+0x0c45 0x6029
+0x0c45 0x602a
+0x0c45 0x602b
+0x0c45 0x602c
+0x0c45 0x6030
+0x0c45 0x6080
+0x0c45 0x6082
+0x0c45 0x6083
+0x0c45 0x6088
+0x0c45 0x608a
+0x0c45 0x608b
+0x0c45 0x608c
+0x0c45 0x608e
+0x0c45 0x608f
+0x0c45 0x60a0
+0x0c45 0x60a2
+0x0c45 0x60a3
+0x0c45 0x60a8
+0x0c45 0x60aa
+0x0c45 0x60ab
+0x0c45 0x60ac
+0x0c45 0x60ae
+0x0c45 0x60af
+0x0c45 0x60b0
+0x0c45 0x60b2
+0x0c45 0x60b3
+0x0c45 0x60b8
+0x0c45 0x60ba
+0x0c45 0x60bb
+0x0c45 0x60bc
+0x0c45 0x60be
+
+The list above does not imply that all those devices work with this driver: up
+until now only the ones that mount the following image sensors are supported;
+kernel messages will always tell you whether this is the case:
+
+Model Manufacturer
+----- ------------
+HV7131D Hynix Semiconductor, Inc.
+MI-0343 Micron Technology, Inc.
+PAS106B PixArt Imaging, Inc.
+PAS202BCB PixArt Imaging, Inc.
+TAS5110C1B Taiwan Advanced Sensor Corporation
+TAS5130D1B Taiwan Advanced Sensor Corporation
+
+All the available control settings of each image sensor are supported through
+the V4L2 interface.
+
+Donations of new models for further testing and support would be much
+appreciated. Non-available hardware will not be supported by the author of this
+driver.
+
+
+10. How to add plug-in's for new image sensors
+==============================================
+It should be easy to write plug-in's for new sensors by using the small API
+that has been created for this purpose, which is present in "sn9c102_sensor.h"
+(documentation is included there). As an example, have a look at the code in
+"sn9c102_pas106b.c", which uses the mentioned interface.
+
+At the moment, possible unsupported image sensors are: CIS-VF10 (VGA),
+OV7620 (VGA), OV7630 (VGA).
+
+
+11. Notes for V4L2 application developers
+=========================================
+This driver follows the V4L2 API specifications. In particular, it enforces two
+rules:
+
+- exactly one I/O method, either "mmap" or "read", is associated with each
+file descriptor. Once it is selected, the application must close and reopen the
+device to switch to the other I/O method;
+
+- although it is not mandatory, previously mapped buffer memory should always
+be unmapped before calling any "VIDIOC_S_CROP" or "VIDIOC_S_FMT" ioctl's.
+The same number of buffers as before will be allocated again to match the size
+of the new video frames, so you have to map the buffers again before any I/O
+attempts on them.
+
+Consistently with the hardware limits, this driver also supports image
+downscaling with arbitrary scaling factors from 1, 2 and 4 in both directions.
+However, the V4L2 API specifications don't correctly define how the scaling
+factor can be chosen arbitrarily by the "negotiation" of the "source" and
+"target" rectangles. To work around this flaw, we have added the convention
+that, during the negotiation, whenever the "VIDIOC_S_CROP" ioctl is issued, the
+scaling factor is restored to 1.
+
+This driver supports two different video formats: the first one is the "8-bit
+Sequential Bayer" format and can be used to obtain uncompressed video data
+from the device through the current I/O method, while the second one provides
+"raw" compressed video data (without frame headers not related to the
+compressed data). The compression quality may vary from 0 to 1 and can be
+selected or queried thanks to the VIDIOC_S_JPEGCOMP and VIDIOC_G_JPEGCOMP V4L2
+ioctl's. For maximum flexibility, both the default active video format and the
+default compression quality depend on how the image sensor being used is
+initialized (as described in the documentation of the API for the image sensors
+supplied by this driver).
+
+
+12. Video frame formats [1]
+=======================
+The SN9C10x PC Camera Controllers can send images in two possible video
+formats over the USB: either native "Sequential RGB Bayer" or Huffman
+compressed. The latter is used to achieve high frame rates. The current video
+format may be selected or queried from the user application by calling the
+VIDIOC_S_FMT or VIDIOC_G_FMT ioctl's, as described in the V4L2 API
+specifications.
+
+The name "Sequential Bayer" indicates the organization of the red, green and
+blue pixels in one video frame. Each pixel is associated with a 8-bit long
+value and is disposed in memory according to the pattern shown below:
+
+B[0] G[1] B[2] G[3] ... B[m-2] G[m-1]
+G[m] R[m+1] G[m+2] R[m+2] ... G[2m-2] R[2m-1]
+...
+... B[(n-1)(m-2)] G[(n-1)(m-1)]
+... G[n(m-2)] R[n(m-1)]
+
+The above matrix also represents the sequential or progressive read-out mode of
+the (n, m) Bayer color filter array used in many CCD/CMOS image sensors.
+
+One compressed video frame consists of a bitstream that encodes for every R, G,
+or B pixel the difference between the value of the pixel itself and some
+reference pixel value. Pixels are organised in the Bayer pattern and the Bayer
+sub-pixels are tracked individually and alternatingly. For example, in the
+first line values for the B and G1 pixels are alternatingly encoded, while in
+the second line values for the G2 and R pixels are alternatingly encoded.
+
+The pixel reference value is calculated as follows:
+- the 4 top left pixels are encoded in raw uncompressed 8-bit format;
+- the value in the top two rows is the value of the pixel left of the current
+ pixel;
+- the value in the left column is the value of the pixel above the current
+ pixel;
+- for all other pixels, the reference value is the average of the value of the
+ pixel on the left and the value of the pixel above the current pixel;
+- there is one code in the bitstream that specifies the value of a pixel
+ directly (in 4-bit resolution);
+- pixel values need to be clamped inside the range [0..255] for proper
+ decoding.
+
+The algorithm purely describes the conversion from compressed Bayer code used
+in the SN9C10x chips to uncompressed Bayer. Additional steps are required to
+convert this to a color image (i.e. a color interpolation algorithm).
+
+The following Huffman codes have been found:
+0: +0 (relative to reference pixel value)
+100: +4
+101: -4?
+1110xxxx: set absolute value to xxxx.0000
+1101: +11
+1111: -11
+11001: +20
+110000: -20
+110001: ??? - these codes are apparently not used
+
+[1] The Huffman compression algorithm has been reverse-engineered and
+ documented by Bertrik Sikken.
+
+
+13. Contact information
+=======================
+The author may be contacted by e-mail at <luca.risolia@studio.unibo.it>.
+
+GPG/PGP encrypted e-mail's are accepted. The GPG key ID of the author is
+'FCE635A4'; the public 1024-bit key should be available at any keyserver;
+the fingerprint is: '88E8 F32F 7244 68BA 3958 5D40 99DA 5D2A FCE6 35A4'.
+
+
+14. Credits
+===========
+Many thanks to following persons for their contribute (listed in alphabetical
+order):
+
+- Luca Capello for the donation of a webcam;
+- Joao Rodrigo Fuzaro, Joao Limirio, Claudio Filho and Caio Begotti for the
+ donation of a webcam;
+- Carlos Eduardo Medaglia Dyonisio, who added the support for the PAS202BCB
+ image sensor;
+- Stefano Mozzi, who donated 45 EU;
+- Bertrik Sikken, who reverse-engineered and documented the Huffman compression
+ algorithm used in the SN9C10x controllers and implemented the first decoder;
+- Mizuno Takafumi for the donation of a webcam;
+- An "anonymous" donator (who didn't want his name to be revealed) for the
+ donation of a webcam.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/stv680.txt b/Documentation/usb/stv680.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..6448041e7a3
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/stv680.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,55 @@
+Linux driver for STV0680 based USB cameras
+
+Copyright, 2001, Kevin Sisson
+
+
+INTRODUCTION:
+
+STMicroelectronics produces the STV0680B chip, which comes in two
+types, -001 and -003. The -003 version allows the recording and downloading
+of sound clips from the camera, and allows a flash attachment. Otherwise,
+it uses the same commands as the -001 version. Both versions support a
+variety of SDRAM sizes and sensors, allowing for a maximum of 26 VGA or 20
+CIF pictures. The STV0680 supports either a serial or a usb interface, and
+video is possible through the usb interface.
+
+The following cameras are known to work with this driver, although any
+camera with Vendor/Product codes of 0553/0202 should work:
+
+Aiptek Pencam (various models)
+Nisis QuickPix 2
+Radio Shack 'Kid's digital camera' (#60-1207)
+At least one Trust Spycam model
+Several other European brand models
+
+WHAT YOU NEED:
+
+- USB support
+- VIDEO4LINUX support
+
+More information about USB support for linux can be found at:
+http://www.linux-usb.org
+
+
+MODULE OPTIONS:
+
+When the driver is compiled as a module, you can set a "swapRGB=1"
+option, if necessary, for those applications that require it
+(such as xawtv). However, the driver should detect and set this
+automatically, so this option should not normally be used.
+
+
+KNOWN PROBLEMS:
+
+The driver seems to work better with the usb-ohci than the usb-uhci host
+controller driver.
+
+HELP:
+
+The latest info on this driver can be found at:
+http://personal.clt.bellsouth.net/~kjsisson or at
+http://stv0680-usb.sourceforge.net
+
+Any questions to me can be send to: kjsisson@bellsouth.net
+
+
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/uhci.txt b/Documentation/usb/uhci.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..2f25952c86c
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/uhci.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,165 @@
+Specification and Internals for the New UHCI Driver (Whitepaper...)
+
+ brought to you by
+
+ Georg Acher, acher@in.tum.de (executive slave) (base guitar)
+ Deti Fliegl, deti@fliegl.de (executive slave) (lead voice)
+ Thomas Sailer, sailer@ife.ee.ethz.ch (chief consultant) (cheer leader)
+
+ $Id: README.uhci,v 1.1 1999/12/14 14:03:02 fliegl Exp $
+
+This document and the new uhci sources can be found on
+ http://hotswap.in.tum.de/usb
+
+1. General issues
+
+1.1 Why a new UHCI driver, we already have one?!?
+
+Correct, but its internal structure got more and more mixed up by the (still
+ongoing) efforts to get isochronous transfers (ISO) to work.
+Since there is an increasing need for reliable ISO-transfers (especially
+for USB-audio needed by TS and for a DAB-USB-Receiver build by GA and DF),
+this state was a bit unsatisfying in our opinion, so we've decided (based
+on knowledge and experiences with the old UHCI driver) to start
+from scratch with a new approach, much simpler but at the same time more
+powerful.
+It is inspired by the way Win98/Win2000 handles USB requests via URBs,
+but it's definitely 100% free of MS-code and doesn't crash while
+unplugging an used ISO-device like Win98 ;-)
+Some code for HW setup and root hub management was taken from the
+original UHCI driver, but heavily modified to fit into the new code.
+The invention of the basic concept, and major coding were completed in two
+days (and nights) on the 16th and 17th of October 1999, now known as the
+great USB-October-Revolution started by GA, DF, and TS ;-)
+
+Since the concept is in no way UHCI dependent, we hope that it will also be
+transferred to the OHCI-driver, so both drivers share a common API.
+
+1.2. Advantages and disadvantages
+
++ All USB transfer types work now!
++ Asynchronous operation
++ Simple, but powerful interface (only two calls for start and cancel)
++ Easy migration to the new API, simplified by a compatibility API
++ Simple usage of ISO transfers
++ Automatic linking of requests
++ ISO transfers allow variable length for each frame and striping
++ No CPU dependent and non-portable atomic memory access, no asm()-inlines
++ Tested on x86 and Alpha
+
+- Rewriting for ISO transfers needed
+
+1.3. Is there some compatibility to the old API?
+
+Yes, but only for control, bulk and interrupt transfers. We've implemented
+some wrapper calls for these transfer types. The usbcore works fine with
+these wrappers. For ISO there's no compatibility, because the old ISO-API
+and its semantics were unnecessary complicated in our opinion.
+
+1.4. What's really working?
+
+As said above, CTRL and BULK already work fine even with the wrappers,
+so legacy code wouldn't notice the change.
+Regarding to Thomas, ISO transfers now run stable with USB audio.
+INT transfers (e.g. mouse driver) work fine, too.
+
+1.5. Are there any bugs?
+
+No ;-)
+Hm...
+Well, of course this implementation needs extensive testing on all available
+hardware, but we believe that any fixes shouldn't harm the overall concept.
+
+1.6. What should be done next?
+
+A large part of the request handling seems to be identical for UHCI and
+OHCI, so it would be a good idea to extract the common parts and have only
+the HW specific stuff in uhci.c. Furthermore, all other USB device drivers
+should need URBification, if they use isochronous or interrupt transfers.
+One thing missing in the current implementation (and the old UHCI driver)
+is fair queueing for BULK transfers. Since this would need (in principle)
+the alteration of already constructed TD chains (to switch from depth to
+breadth execution), another way has to be found. Maybe some simple
+heuristics work with the same effect.
+
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+2. Internal structure and mechanisms
+
+To get quickly familiar with the internal structures, here's a short
+description how the new UHCI driver works. However, the ultimate source of
+truth is only uhci.c!
+
+2.1. Descriptor structure (QHs and TDs)
+
+During initialization, the following skeleton is allocated in init_skel:
+
+ framespecific | common chain
+
+framelist[]
+[ 0 ]-----> TD --> TD -------\
+[ 1 ]-----> TD --> TD --------> TD ----> QH -------> QH -------> QH ---> NULL
+ ... TD --> TD -------/
+[1023]-----> TD --> TD ------/
+
+ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^
+ 1024 TDs for 7 TDs for 1 TD for Start of Start of End Chain
+ ISO INT (2-128ms) 1ms-INT CTRL Chain BULK Chain
+
+For each CTRL or BULK transfer a new QH is allocated and the containing data
+transfers are appended as (vertical) TDs. After building the whole QH with its
+dangling TDs, the QH is inserted before the BULK Chain QH (for CTRL) or
+before the End Chain QH (for BULK). Since only the QH->next pointers are
+affected, no atomic memory operation is required. The three QHs in the
+common chain are never equipped with TDs!
+
+For ISO or INT, the TD for each frame is simply inserted into the appropriate
+ISO/INT-TD-chain for the desired frame. The 7 skeleton INT-TDs are scattered
+among the 1024 frames similar to the old UHCI driver.
+
+For CTRL/BULK/ISO, the last TD in the transfer has the IOC-bit set. For INT,
+every TD (there is only one...) has the IOC-bit set.
+
+Besides the data for the UHCI controller (2 or 4 32bit words), the descriptors
+are double-linked through the .vertical and .horizontal elements in the
+SW data of the descriptor (using the double-linked list structures and
+operations), but SW-linking occurs only in closed domains, i.e. for each of
+the 1024 ISO-chains and the 8 INT-chains there is a closed cycle. This
+simplifies all insertions and unlinking operations and avoids costly
+bus_to_virt()-calls.
+
+2.2. URB structure and linking to QH/TDs
+
+During assembly of the QH and TDs of the requested action, these descriptors
+are stored in urb->urb_list, so the allocated QH/TD descriptors are bound to
+this URB.
+If the assembly was successful and the descriptors were added to the HW chain,
+the corresponding URB is inserted into a global URB list for this controller.
+This list stores all pending URBs.
+
+2.3. Interrupt processing
+
+Since UHCI provides no means to directly detect completed transactions, the
+following is done in each UHCI interrupt (uhci_interrupt()):
+
+For each URB in the pending queue (process_urb()), the ACTIVE-flag of the
+associated TDs are processed (depending on the transfer type
+process_{transfer|interrupt|iso}()). If the TDs are not active anymore,
+they indicate the completion of the transaction and the status is calculated.
+Inactive QH/TDs are removed from the HW chain (since the host controller
+already removed the TDs from the QH, no atomic access is needed) and
+eventually the URB is marked as completed (OK or errors) and removed from the
+pending queue. Then the next linked URB is submitted. After (or immediately
+before) that, the completion handler is called.
+
+2.4. Unlinking URBs
+
+First, all QH/TDs stored in the URB are unlinked from the HW chain.
+To ensure that the host controller really left a vertical TD chain, we
+wait for one frame. After that, the TDs are physically destroyed.
+
+2.5. URB linking and the consequences
+
+Since URBs can be linked and the corresponding submit_urb is called in
+the UHCI-interrupt, all work associated with URB/QH/TD assembly has to be
+interrupt save. This forces kmalloc to use GFP_ATOMIC in the interrupt.
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/usb-help.txt b/Documentation/usb/usb-help.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..b7c32497369
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/usb-help.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,19 @@
+usb-help.txt
+2000-July-12
+
+For USB help other than the readme files that are located in
+Documentation/usb/*, see the following:
+
+Linux-USB project: http://www.linux-usb.org
+ mirrors at http://www.suse.cz/development/linux-usb/
+ and http://usb.in.tum.de/linux-usb/
+ and http://it.linux-usb.org
+Linux USB Guide: http://linux-usb.sourceforge.net
+Linux-USB device overview (working devices and drivers):
+ http://www.qbik.ch/usb/devices/
+
+The Linux-USB mailing lists are:
+ linux-usb-users@lists.sourceforge.net for general user help
+ linux-usb-devel@lists.sourceforge.net for developer discussions
+
+###
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/usb-serial.txt b/Documentation/usb/usb-serial.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..f001cd93b79
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/usb-serial.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,470 @@
+INTRODUCTION
+
+ The USB serial driver currently supports a number of different USB to
+ serial converter products, as well as some devices that use a serial
+ interface from userspace to talk to the device.
+
+ See the individual product section below for specific information about
+ the different devices.
+
+
+CONFIGURATION
+
+ Currently the driver can handle up to 256 different serial interfaces at
+ one time.
+
+ If you are not using devfs:
+ The major number that the driver uses is 188 so to use the driver,
+ create the following nodes:
+ mknod /dev/ttyUSB0 c 188 0
+ mknod /dev/ttyUSB1 c 188 1
+ mknod /dev/ttyUSB2 c 188 2
+ mknod /dev/ttyUSB3 c 188 3
+ .
+ .
+ .
+ mknod /dev/ttyUSB254 c 188 254
+ mknod /dev/ttyUSB255 c 188 255
+
+ If you are using devfs:
+ The devices supported by this driver will show up as
+ /dev/usb/tts/{0,1,...}
+
+ When the device is connected and recognized by the driver, the driver
+ will print to the system log, which node(s) the device has been bound
+ to.
+
+
+SPECIFIC DEVICES SUPPORTED
+
+
+ConnectTech WhiteHEAT 4 port converter
+
+ ConnectTech has been very forthcoming with information about their
+ device, including providing a unit to test with.
+
+ The driver is officially supported by Connect Tech Inc.
+ http://www.connecttech.com
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact
+ Stuart MacDonald at stuartm@connecttech.com
+
+
+HandSpring Visor, Palm USB, and Clié USB driver
+
+ This driver works with all HandSpring USB, Palm USB, and Sony Clié USB
+ devices.
+
+ Only when the device tries to connect to the host, will the device show
+ up to the host as a valid USB device. When this happens, the device is
+ properly enumerated, assigned a port, and then communication _should_ be
+ possible. The driver cleans up properly when the device is removed, or
+ the connection is canceled on the device.
+
+ NOTE:
+ This means that in order to talk to the device, the sync button must be
+ pressed BEFORE trying to get any program to communicate to the device.
+ This goes against the current documentation for pilot-xfer and other
+ packages, but is the only way that it will work due to the hardware
+ in the device.
+
+ When the device is connected, try talking to it on the second port
+ (this is usually /dev/ttyUSB1 if you do not have any other usb-serial
+ devices in the system.) The system log should tell you which port is
+ the port to use for the HotSync transfer. The "Generic" port can be used
+ for other device communication, such as a PPP link.
+
+ For some Sony Clié devices, /dev/ttyUSB0 must be used to talk to the
+ device. This is true for all OS version 3.5 devices, and most devices
+ that have had a flash upgrade to a newer version of the OS. See the
+ kernel system log for information on which is the correct port to use.
+
+ If after pressing the sync button, nothing shows up in the system log,
+ try resetting the device, first a hot reset, and then a cold reset if
+ necessary. Some devices need this before they can talk to the USB port
+ properly.
+
+ Devices that are not compiled into the kernel can be specified with module
+ parameters. e.g. modprobe visor vendor=0x54c product=0x66
+
+ There is a webpage and mailing lists for this portion of the driver at:
+ http://usbvisor.sourceforge.net/
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Greg
+ Kroah-Hartman at greg@kroah.com
+
+
+PocketPC PDA Driver
+
+ This driver can be used to connect to Compaq iPAQ, HP Jornada, Casio EM500
+ and other PDAs running Windows CE 3.0 or PocketPC 2002 using a USB
+ cable/cradle.
+ Most devices supported by ActiveSync are supported out of the box.
+ For others, please use module parameters to specify the product and vendor
+ id. e.g. modprobe ipaq vendor=0x3f0 product=0x1125
+
+ The driver presents a serial interface (usually on /dev/ttyUSB0) over
+ which one may run ppp and establish a TCP/IP link to the PDA. Once this
+ is done, you can transfer files, backup, download email etc. The most
+ significant advantage of using USB is speed - I can get 73 to 113
+ kbytes/sec for download/upload to my iPAQ.
+
+ This driver is only one of a set of components required to utilize
+ the USB connection. Please visit http://synce.sourceforge.net which
+ contains the necessary packages and a simple step-by-step howto.
+
+ Once connected, you can use Win CE programs like ftpView, Pocket Outlook
+ from the PDA and xcerdisp, synce utilities from the Linux side.
+
+ To use Pocket IE, follow the instructions given at
+ http://www.tekguru.co.uk/EM500/usbtonet.htm to achieve the same thing
+ on Win98. Omit the proxy server part; Linux is quite capable of forwarding
+ packets unlike Win98. Another modification is required at least for the
+ iPAQ - disable autosync by going to the Start/Settings/Connections menu
+ and unchecking the "Automatically synchronize ..." box. Go to
+ Start/Programs/Connections, connect the cable and select "usbdial" (or
+ whatever you named your new USB connection). You should finally wind
+ up with a "Connected to usbdial" window with status shown as connected.
+ Now start up PIE and browse away.
+
+ If it doesn't work for some reason, load both the usbserial and ipaq module
+ with the module parameter "debug" set to 1 and examine the system log.
+ You can also try soft-resetting your PDA before attempting a connection.
+
+ Other functionality may be possible depending on your PDA. According to
+ Wes Cilldhaire <billybobjoehenrybob@hotmail.com>, with the Toshiba E570,
+ ...if you boot into the bootloader (hold down the power when hitting the
+ reset button, continuing to hold onto the power until the bootloader screen
+ is displayed), then put it in the cradle with the ipaq driver loaded, open
+ a terminal on /dev/ttyUSB0, it gives you a "USB Reflash" terminal, which can
+ be used to flash the ROM, as well as the microP code.. so much for needing
+ Toshiba's $350 serial cable for flashing!! :D
+ NOTE: This has NOT been tested. Use at your own risk.
+
+ For any questions or problems with the driver, please contact Ganesh
+ Varadarajan <ganesh@veritas.com>
+
+
+Keyspan PDA Serial Adapter
+
+ Single port DB-9 serial adapter, pushed as a PDA adapter for iMacs (mostly
+ sold in Macintosh catalogs, comes in a translucent white/green dongle).
+ Fairly simple device. Firmware is homebrew.
+ This driver also works for the Xircom/Entrgra single port serial adapter.
+
+ Current status:
+ Things that work:
+ basic input/output (tested with 'cu')
+ blocking write when serial line can't keep up
+ changing baud rates (up to 115200)
+ getting/setting modem control pins (TIOCM{GET,SET,BIS,BIC})
+ sending break (although duration looks suspect)
+ Things that don't:
+ device strings (as logged by kernel) have trailing binary garbage
+ device ID isn't right, might collide with other Keyspan products
+ changing baud rates ought to flush tx/rx to avoid mangled half characters
+ Big Things on the todo list:
+ parity, 7 vs 8 bits per char, 1 or 2 stop bits
+ HW flow control
+ not all of the standard USB descriptors are handled: Get_Status, Set_Feature
+ O_NONBLOCK, select()
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Brian
+ Warner at warner@lothar.com
+
+
+Keyspan USA-series Serial Adapters
+
+ Single, Dual and Quad port adapters - driver uses Keyspan supplied
+ firmware and is being developed with their support.
+
+ Current status:
+ The USA-18X, USA-28X, USA-19, USA-19W and USA-49W are supported and
+ have been pretty throughly tested at various baud rates with 8-N-1
+ character settings. Other character lengths and parity setups are
+ presently untested.
+
+ The USA-28 isn't yet supported though doing so should be pretty
+ straightforward. Contact the maintainer if you require this
+ functionality.
+
+ More information is available at:
+ http://misc.nu/hugh/keyspan.html
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Hugh
+ Blemings at hugh@misc.nu
+
+
+FTDI Single Port Serial Driver
+
+ This is a single port DB-25 serial adapter. More information about this
+ device and the Linux driver can be found at:
+ http://reality.sgi.com/bryder_wellington/ftdi_sio/
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Bill Ryder
+ at bryder@sgi.com
+
+
+ZyXEL omni.net lcd plus ISDN TA
+
+ This is an ISDN TA. Please report both successes and troubles to
+ azummo@towertech.it
+
+
+Cypress M8 CY4601 Family Serial Driver
+
+ This driver was in most part developed by Neil "koyama" Whelchel. It
+ has been improved since that previous form to support dynamic serial
+ line settings and improved line handling. The driver is for the most
+ part stable and has been tested on an smp machine. (dual p2)
+
+ Chipsets supported under CY4601 family:
+
+ CY7C63723, CY7C63742, CY7C63743, CY7C64013
+
+ Devices supported:
+
+ -DeLorme's USB Earthmate (SiRF Star II lp arch)
+ -Cypress HID->COM RS232 adapter
+
+ Note: Cypress Semiconductor claims no affiliation with the
+ the hid->com device.
+
+ Most devices using chipsets under the CY4601 family should
+ work with the driver. As long as they stay true to the CY4601
+ usbserial specification.
+
+ Technical notes:
+
+ The Earthmate starts out at 4800 8N1 by default... the driver will
+ upon start init to this setting. usbserial core provides the rest
+ of the termios settings, along with some custom termios so that the
+ output is in proper format and parsable.
+
+ The device can be put into sirf mode by issuing NMEA command:
+ $PSRF100,<protocol>,<baud>,<databits>,<stopbits>,<parity>*CHECKSUM
+ $PSRF100,0,9600,8,1,0*0C
+
+ It should then be sufficient to change the port termios to match this
+ to begin communicating.
+
+ As far as I can tell it supports pretty much every sirf command as
+ documented online available with firmware 2.31, with some unknown
+ message ids.
+
+ The hid->com adapter can run at a maximum baud of 115200bps. Please note
+ that the device has trouble or is incapable of raising line voltage properly.
+ It will be fine with null modem links, as long as you do not try to link two
+ together without hacking the adapter to set the line high.
+
+ The driver is smp safe. Performance with the driver is rather low when using
+ it for transfering files. This is being worked on, but I would be willing to
+ accept patches. An urb queue or packet buffer would likely fit the bill here.
+
+ If you have any questions, problems, patches, feature requests, etc. you can
+ contact me here via email:
+ dignome@gmail.com
+ (your problems/patches can alternately be submitted to usb-devel)
+
+
+Digi AccelePort Driver
+
+ This driver supports the Digi AccelePort USB 2 and 4 devices, 2 port
+ (plus a parallel port) and 4 port USB serial converters. The driver
+ does NOT yet support the Digi AccelePort USB 8.
+
+ This driver works under SMP with the usb-uhci driver. It does not
+ work under SMP with the uhci driver.
+
+ The driver is generally working, though we still have a few more ioctls
+ to implement and final testing and debugging to do. The paralled port
+ on the USB 2 is supported as a serial to parallel converter; in other
+ words, it appears as another USB serial port on Linux, even though
+ physically it is really a parallel port. The Digi Acceleport USB 8
+ is not yet supported.
+
+ Please contact Peter Berger (pberger@brimson.com) or Al Borchers
+ (alborchers@steinerpoint.com) for questions or problems with this
+ driver.
+
+
+Belkin USB Serial Adapter F5U103
+
+ Single port DB-9/PS-2 serial adapter from Belkin with firmware by eTEK Labs.
+ The Peracom single port serial adapter also works with this driver, as
+ well as the GoHubs adapter.
+
+ Current status:
+ The following have been tested and work:
+ Baud rate 300-230400
+ Data bits 5-8
+ Stop bits 1-2
+ Parity N,E,O,M,S
+ Handshake None, Software (XON/XOFF), Hardware (CTSRTS,CTSDTR)*
+ Break Set and clear
+ Line contrl Input/Output query and control **
+
+ * Hardware input flow control is only enabled for firmware
+ levels above 2.06. Read source code comments describing Belkin
+ firmware errata. Hardware output flow control is working for all
+ firmware versions.
+ ** Queries of inputs (CTS,DSR,CD,RI) show the last
+ reported state. Queries of outputs (DTR,RTS) show the last
+ requested state and may not reflect current state as set by
+ automatic hardware flow control.
+
+ TO DO List:
+ -- Add true modem contol line query capability. Currently tracks the
+ states reported by the interrupt and the states requested.
+ -- Add error reporting back to application for UART error conditions.
+ -- Add support for flush ioctls.
+ -- Add everything else that is missing :)
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact William
+ Greathouse at wgreathouse@smva.com
+
+
+Empeg empeg-car Mark I/II Driver
+
+ This is an experimental driver to provide connectivity support for the
+ client synchronization tools for an Empeg empeg-car mp3 player.
+
+ Tips:
+ * Don't forget to create the device nodes for ttyUSB{0,1,2,...}
+ * modprobe empeg (modprobe is your friend)
+ * emptool --usb /dev/ttyUSB0 (or whatever you named your device node)
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Gary
+ Brubaker at xavyer@ix.netcom.com
+
+
+MCT USB Single Port Serial Adapter U232
+
+ This driver is for the MCT USB-RS232 Converter (25 pin, Model No.
+ U232-P25) from Magic Control Technology Corp. (there is also a 9 pin
+ Model No. U232-P9). More information about this device can be found at
+ the manufacture's web-site: http://www.mct.com.tw.
+
+ The driver is generally working, though it still needs some more testing.
+ It is derived from the Belkin USB Serial Adapter F5U103 driver and its
+ TODO list is valid for this driver as well.
+
+ This driver has also been found to work for other products, which have
+ the same Vendor ID but different Product IDs. Sitecom's U232-P25 serial
+ converter uses Product ID 0x230 and Vendor ID 0x711 and works with this
+ driver. Also, D-Link's DU-H3SP USB BAY also works with this driver.
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Wolfgang
+ Grandegger at wolfgang@ces.ch
+
+
+Inside Out Networks Edgeport Driver
+
+ This driver supports all devices made by Inside Out Networks, specifically
+ the following models:
+ Edgeport/4
+ Rapidport/4
+ Edgeport/4t
+ Edgeport/2
+ Edgeport/4i
+ Edgeport/2i
+ Edgeport/421
+ Edgeport/21
+ Edgeport/8
+ Edgeport/8 Dual
+ Edgeport/2D8
+ Edgeport/4D8
+ Edgeport/8i
+ Edgeport/2 DIN
+ Edgeport/4 DIN
+ Edgeport/16 Dual
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Greg
+ Kroah-Hartman at greg@kroah.com
+
+
+REINER SCT cyberJack pinpad/e-com USB chipcard reader
+
+ Interface to ISO 7816 compatible contactbased chipcards, e.g. GSM SIMs.
+
+ Current status:
+ This is the kernel part of the driver for this USB card reader.
+ There is also a user part for a CT-API driver available. A site
+ for downloading is TBA. For now, you can request it from the
+ maintainer (linux-usb@sii.li).
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact
+ linux-usb@sii.li
+
+
+Prolific PL2303 Driver
+
+ This driver support any device that has the PL2303 chip from Prolific
+ in it. This includes a number of single port USB to serial
+ converters and USB GPS devices. Devices from Aten (the UC-232) and
+ IO-Data work with this driver.
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Greg
+ Kroah-Hartman at greg@kroah.com
+
+
+KL5KUSB105 chipset / PalmConnect USB single-port adapter
+
+Current status:
+ The driver was put together by looking at the usb bus transactions
+ done by Palm's driver under Windows, so a lot of functionality is
+ still missing. Notably, serial ioctls are sometimes faked or not yet
+ implemented. Support for finding out about DSR and CTS line status is
+ however implemented (though not nicely), so your favorite autopilot(1)
+ and pilot-manager -daemon calls will work. Baud rates up to 115200
+ are supported, but handshaking (software or hardware) is not, which is
+ why it is wise to cut down on the rate used is wise for large
+ transfers until this is settled.
+
+Options supported:
+ If this driver is compiled as a module you can pass the following
+ options to it:
+ debug - extra verbose debugging info
+ (default: 0; nonzero enables)
+ use_lowlatency - use low_latency flag to speed up tty layer
+ when reading from from the device.
+ (default: 0; nonzero enables)
+
+ See http://www.uuhaus.de/linux/palmconnect.html for up-to-date
+ information on this driver.
+
+
+Generic Serial driver
+
+ If your device is not one of the above listed devices, compatible with
+ the above models, you can try out the "generic" interface. This
+ interface does not provide any type of control messages sent to the
+ device, and does not support any kind of device flow control. All that
+ is required of your device is that it has at least one bulk in endpoint,
+ or one bulk out endpoint.
+
+ To enable the generic driver to recognize your device, build the driver
+ as a module and load it by the following invocation:
+ insmod usbserial vendor=0x#### product=0x####
+ where the #### is replaced with the hex representation of your device's
+ vendor id and product id.
+
+ This driver has been successfully used to connect to the NetChip USB
+ development board, providing a way to develop USB firmware without
+ having to write a custom driver.
+
+ For any questions or problems with this driver, please contact Greg
+ Kroah-Hartman at greg@kroah.com
+
+
+CONTACT:
+
+ If anyone has any problems using these drivers, with any of the above
+ specified products, please contact the specific driver's author listed
+ above, or join the Linux-USB mailing list (information on joining the
+ mailing list, as well as a link to its searchable archive is at
+ http://www.linux-usb.org/ )
+
+
+Greg Kroah-Hartman
+greg@kroah.com
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/usbmon.txt b/Documentation/usb/usbmon.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..2f8431f92b7
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/usbmon.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,156 @@
+* Introduction
+
+The name "usbmon" in lowercase refers to a facility in kernel which is
+used to collect traces of I/O on the USB bus. This function is analogous
+to a packet socket used by network monitoring tools such as tcpdump(1)
+or Ethereal. Similarly, it is expected that a tool such as usbdump or
+USBMon (with uppercase letters) is used to examine raw traces produced
+by usbmon.
+
+The usbmon reports requests made by peripheral-specific drivers to Host
+Controller Drivers (HCD). So, if HCD is buggy, the traces reported by
+usbmon may not correspond to bus transactions precisely. This is the same
+situation as with tcpdump.
+
+* How to use usbmon to collect raw text traces
+
+Unlike the packet socket, usbmon has an interface which provides traces
+in a text format. This is used for two purposes. First, it serves as a
+common trace exchange format for tools while most sophisticated formats
+are finalized. Second, humans can read it in case tools are not available.
+
+To collect a raw text trace, execute following steps.
+
+1. Prepare
+
+Mount debugfs (it has to be enabled in your kernel configuration), and
+load the usbmon module (if built as module). The second step is skipped
+if usbmon is built into the kernel.
+
+# mount -t debugfs none_debugs /sys/kernel/debug
+# modprobe usbmon
+
+Verify that bus sockets are present.
+
+[root@lembas zaitcev]# ls /sys/kernel/debug/usbmon
+1s 1t 2s 2t 3s 3t 4s 4t
+[root@lembas zaitcev]#
+
+# ls /sys/kernel
+
+2. Find which bus connects to the desired device
+
+Run "cat /proc/bus/usb/devices", and find the T-line which corresponds to
+the device. Usually you do it by looking for the vendor string. If you have
+many similar devices, unplug one and compare two /proc/bus/usb/devices outputs.
+The T-line will have a bus number. Example:
+
+T: Bus=03 Lev=01 Prnt=01 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 2 Spd=12 MxCh= 0
+D: Ver= 1.10 Cls=00(>ifc ) Sub=00 Prot=00 MxPS= 8 #Cfgs= 1
+P: Vendor=0557 ProdID=2004 Rev= 1.00
+S: Manufacturer=ATEN
+S: Product=UC100KM V2.00
+
+Bus=03 means it's bus 3.
+
+3. Start 'cat'
+
+# cat /sys/kernel/debug/usbmon/3t > /tmp/1.mon.out
+
+This process will be reading until killed. Naturally, the output can be
+redirected to a desirable location. This is preferred, because it is going
+to be quite long.
+
+4. Perform the desired operation on the USB bus
+
+This is where you do something that creates the traffic: plug in a flash key,
+copy files, control a webcam, etc.
+
+5. Kill cat
+
+Usually it's done with a keyboard interrupt (Control-C).
+
+At this point the output file (/tmp/1.mon.out in this example) can be saved,
+sent by e-mail, or inspected with a text editor. In the last case make sure
+that the file size is not excessive for your favourite editor.
+
+* Raw text data format
+
+The '0t' type data consists of a stream of events, such as URB submission,
+URB callback, submission error. Every event is a text line, which consists
+of whitespace separated words. The number of position of words may depend
+on the event type, but there is a set of words, common for all types.
+
+Here is the list of words, from left to right:
+- URB Tag. This is used to identify URBs is normally a kernel mode address
+ of the URB structure in hexadecimal.
+- Timestamp in microseconds, a decimal number. The timestamp's resolution
+ depends on available clock, and so it can be much worse than a microsecond
+ (if the implementation uses jiffies, for example).
+- Event Type. This type refers to the format of the event, not URB type.
+ Available types are: S - submission, C - callback, E - submission error.
+- "Pipe". The pipe concept is deprecated. This is a composite word, used to
+ be derived from information in pipes. It consists of three fields, separated
+ by colons: URB type and direction, Device address, Endpoint number.
+ Type and direction are encoded with two bytes in the following manner:
+ Ci Co Control input and output
+ Zi Zo Isochronous input and output
+ Ii Io Interrupt input and output
+ Bi Bo Bulk input and output
+ Device address and Endpoint number are decimal numbers with leading zeroes
+ or 3 and 2 positions, correspondingly.
+- URB Status. This field makes no sense for submissions, but is present
+ to help scripts with parsing. In error case, it contains the error code.
+- Data Length. This is the actual length in the URB.
+- Data tag. The usbmon may not always capture data, even if length is nonzero.
+ Only if tag is '=', the data words are present.
+- Data words follow, in big endian hexadecimal format. Notice that they are
+ not machine words, but really just a byte stream split into words to make
+ it easier to read. Thus, the last word may contain from one to four bytes.
+ The length of collected data is limited and can be less than the data length
+ report in Data Length word.
+
+Here is an example of code to read the data stream in a well known programming
+language:
+
+class ParsedLine {
+ int data_len; /* Available length of data */
+ byte data[];
+
+ void parseData(StringTokenizer st) {
+ int availwords = st.countTokens();
+ data = new byte[availwords * 4];
+ data_len = 0;
+ while (st.hasMoreTokens()) {
+ String data_str = st.nextToken();
+ int len = data_str.length() / 2;
+ int i;
+ for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
+ data[data_len] = Byte.parseByte(
+ data_str.substring(i*2, i*2 + 2),
+ 16);
+ data_len++;
+ }
+ }
+ }
+}
+
+This format is obviously deficient. For example, the setup packet for control
+transfers is not delivered. This will change in the future.
+
+Examples:
+
+An input control transfer to get a port status:
+
+d74ff9a0 2640288196 S Ci:001:00 -115 4 <
+d74ff9a0 2640288202 C Ci:001:00 0 4 = 01010100
+
+An output bulk transfer to send a SCSI command 0x5E in a 31-byte Bulk wrapper
+to a storage device at address 5:
+
+dd65f0e8 4128379752 S Bo:005:02 -115 31 = 55534243 5e000000 00000000 00000600 00000000 00000000 00000000 000000
+dd65f0e8 4128379808 C Bo:005:02 0 31 >
+
+* Raw binary format and API
+
+TBD
diff --git a/Documentation/usb/w9968cf.txt b/Documentation/usb/w9968cf.txt
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..18a47738d56
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Documentation/usb/w9968cf.txt
@@ -0,0 +1,481 @@
+
+ W996[87]CF JPEG USB Dual Mode Camera Chip
+ Driver for Linux 2.6 (basic version)
+ =========================================
+
+ - Documentation -
+
+
+Index
+=====
+1. Copyright
+2. Disclaimer
+3. License
+4. Overview
+5. Supported devices
+6. Module dependencies
+7. Module loading
+8. Module paramaters
+9. Contact information
+10. Credits
+
+
+1. Copyright
+============
+Copyright (C) 2002-2004 by Luca Risolia <luca.risolia@studio.unibo.it>
+
+
+2. Disclaimer
+=============
+Winbond is a trademark of Winbond Electronics Corporation.
+This software is not sponsored or developed by Winbond.
+
+
+3. License
+==========
+This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
+it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
+the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
+(at your option) any later version.
+
+This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
+but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
+MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
+GNU General Public License for more details.
+
+You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
+along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
+Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
+
+
+4. Overview
+===========
+This driver supports the video streaming capabilities of the devices mounting
+Winbond W9967CF and Winbond W9968CF JPEG USB Dual Mode Camera Chips. OV681
+based cameras should be supported as well.
+
+The driver is divided into two modules: the basic one, "w9968cf", is needed for
+the supported devices to work; the second one, "w9968cf-vpp", is an optional
+module, which provides some useful video post-processing functions like video
+decoding, up-scaling and colour conversions. Once the driver is installed,
+every time an application tries to open a recognized device, "w9968cf" checks
+the presence of the "w9968cf-vpp" module and loads it automatically by default.
+
+Please keep in mind that official kernels do not include the second module for
+performance purposes. However it is always recommended to download and install
+the latest and complete release of the driver, replacing the existing one, if
+present: it will be still even possible not to load the "w9968cf-vpp" module at
+all, if you ever want to. Another important missing feature of the version in
+the official Linux 2.4 kernels is the writeable /proc filesystem interface.
+
+The latest and full-featured version of the W996[87]CF driver can be found at:
+http://www.linux-projects.org. Please refer to the documentation included in
+that package, if you are going to use it.
+
+Up to 32 cameras can be handled at the same time. They can be connected and
+disconnected from the host many times without turning off the computer, if
+your system supports the hotplug facility.
+
+To change the default settings for each camera, many parameters can be passed
+through command line when the module is loaded into memory.
+
+The driver relies on the Video4Linux, USB and I2C core modules. It has been
+designed to run properly on SMP systems as well. An additional module,
+"ovcamchip", is mandatory; it provides support for some OmniVision image
+sensors connected to the W996[87]CF chips; if found in the system, the module
+will be automatically loaded by default (provided that the kernel has been
+compiled with the automatic module loading option).
+
+
+5. Supported devices
+====================
+At the moment, known W996[87]CF and OV681 based devices are:
+- Aroma Digi Pen VGA Dual Mode ADG-5000 (unknown image sensor)
+- AVerMedia AVerTV USB (SAA7111A, Philips FI1216Mk2 tuner, PT2313L audio chip)
+- Creative Labs Video Blaster WebCam Go (OmniVision OV7610 sensor)
+- Creative Labs Video Blaster WebCam Go Plus (OmniVision OV7620 sensor)
+- Lebon LDC-035A (unknown image sensor)
+- Ezonics EZ-802 EZMega Cam (OmniVision OV8610C sensor)
+- OmniVision OV8610-EDE (OmniVision OV8610 sensor)
+- OPCOM Digi Pen VGA Dual Mode Pen Camera (unknown image sensor)
+- Pretec Digi Pen-II (OmniVision OV7620 sensor)
+- Pretec DigiPen-480 (OmniVision OV8610 sensor)
+
+If you know any other W996[87]CF or OV681 based cameras, please contact me.
+
+The list above does not imply that all those devices work with this driver: up
+until now only webcams that have an image sensor supported by the "ovcamchip"
+module work. Kernel messages will always tell you whether this is case.
+
+Possible external microcontrollers of those webcams are not supported: this
+means that still images cannot be downloaded from the device memory.
+
+Furthermore, it's worth to note that I was only able to run tests on my
+"Creative Labs Video Blaster WebCam Go". Donations of other models, for
+additional testing and full support, would be much appreciated.
+
+
+6. Module dependencies
+======================
+For it to work properly, the driver needs kernel support for Video4Linux, USB
+and I2C, and the "ovcamchip" module for the image sensor. Make sure you are not
+actually using any external "ovcamchip" module, given that the W996[87]CF
+driver depends on the version of the module present in the official kernels.
+
+The following options of the kernel configuration file must be enabled and
+corresponding modules must be compiled:
+
+ # Multimedia devices
+ #
+ CONFIG_VIDEO_DEV=m
+
+ # I2C support
+ #
+ CONFIG_I2C=m
+
+The I2C core module can be compiled statically in the kernel as well.
+
+ # OmniVision Camera Chip support
+ #
+ CONFIG_VIDEO_OVCAMCHIP=m
+
+ # USB support
+ #
+ CONFIG_USB=m
+
+In addition, depending on the hardware being used, only one of the modules
+below is necessary:
+
+ # USB Host Controller Drivers
+ #
+ CONFIG_USB_EHCI_HCD=m
+ CONFIG_USB_UHCI_HCD=m
+ CONFIG_USB_OHCI_HCD=m
+
+And finally:
+
+ # USB Multimedia devices
+ #
+ CONFIG_USB_W9968CF=m
+
+
+7. Module loading
+=================
+To use the driver, it is necessary to load the "w9968cf" module into memory
+after every other module required.
+
+Loading can be done this way, from root:
+
+ [root@localhost home]# modprobe usbcore
+ [root@localhost home]# modprobe i2c-core
+ [root@localhost home]# modprobe videodev
+ [root@localhost home]# modprobe w9968cf
+
+At this point the pertinent devices should be recognized: "dmesg" can be used
+to analyze kernel messages:
+
+ [user@localhost home]$ dmesg
+
+There are a lot of parameters the module can use to change the default
+settings for each device. To list every possible parameter with a brief
+explanation about them and which syntax to use, it is recommended to run the
+"modinfo" command:
+
+ [root@locahost home]# modinfo w9968cf
+
+
+8. Module parameters
+====================
+Module parameters are listed below:
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: ovmod_load
+Type: bool
+Syntax: <0|1>
+Description: Automatic 'ovcamchip' module loading: 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+ If enabled, 'insmod' searches for the required 'ovcamchip'
+ module in the system, according to its configuration, and
+ loads that module automatically. This action is performed as
+ once soon as the 'w9968cf' module is loaded into memory.
+Default: 1
+Note: The kernel must be compiled with the CONFIG_KMOD option
+ enabled for the 'ovcamchip' module to be loaded and for
+ this parameter to be present.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: vppmod_load
+Type: bool
+Syntax: <0|1>
+Description: Automatic 'w9968cf-vpp' module loading: 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+ If enabled, every time an application attempts to open a
+ camera, 'insmod' searches for the video post-processing module
+ in the system and loads it automatically (if present).
+ The optional 'w9968cf-vpp' module adds extra image manipulation
+ capabilities to the 'w9968cf' module,like software up-scaling,
+ colour conversions and video decompression for very high frame
+ rates.
+Default: 1
+Note: The kernel must be compiled with the CONFIG_KMOD option
+ enabled for the 'w9968cf-vpp' module to be loaded and for
+ this parameter to be present.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: simcams
+Type: int
+Syntax: <n>
+Description: Number of cameras allowed to stream simultaneously.
+ n may vary from 0 to 32.
+Default: 32
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: video_nr
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <-1|n[,...]>
+Description: Specify V4L minor mode number.
+ -1 = use next available
+ n = use minor number n
+ You can specify up to 32 cameras this way.
+ For example:
+ video_nr=-1,2,-1 would assign minor number 2 to the second
+ recognized camera and use auto for the first one and for every
+ other camera.
+Default: -1
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: packet_size
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: Specify the maximum data payload size in bytes for alternate
+ settings, for each device. n is scaled between 63 and 1023.
+Default: 1023
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: max_buffers
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: For advanced users.
+ Specify the maximum number of video frame buffers to allocate
+ for each device, from 2 to 32.
+Default: 2
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: double_buffer
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Hardware double buffering: 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+ It should be enabled if you want smooth video output: if you
+ obtain out of sync. video, disable it, or try to
+ decrease the 'clockdiv' module parameter value.
+Default: 1 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: clamping
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Video data clamping: 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: filter_type
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1|2[,...]>
+Description: Video filter type.
+ 0 none, 1 (1-2-1) 3-tap filter, 2 (2-3-6-3-2) 5-tap filter.
+ The filter is used to reduce noise and aliasing artifacts
+ produced by the CCD or CMOS image sensor.
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: largeview
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Large view: 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+Default: 1 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: upscaling
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Software scaling (for non-compressed video only):
+ 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+ Disable it if you have a slow CPU or you don't have enough
+ memory.
+Default: 0 for every device.
+Note: If 'w9968cf-vpp' is not present, this parameter is set to 0.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: decompression
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1|2[,...]>
+Description: Software video decompression:
+ 0 = disables decompression
+ (doesn't allow formats needing decompression).
+ 1 = forces decompression
+ (allows formats needing decompression only).
+ 2 = allows any permitted formats.
+ Formats supporting (de)compressed video are YUV422P and
+ YUV420P/YUV420 in any resolutions where width and height are
+ multiples of 16.
+Default: 2 for every device.
+Note: If 'w9968cf-vpp' is not present, forcing decompression is not
+ allowed; in this case this parameter is set to 2.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: force_palette
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|9|10|13|15|8|7|1|6|3|4|5[,...]>
+Description: Force picture palette.
+ In order:
+ 0 = Off - allows any of the following formats:
+ 9 = UYVY 16 bpp - Original video, compression disabled
+ 10 = YUV420 12 bpp - Original video, compression enabled
+ 13 = YUV422P 16 bpp - Original video, compression enabled
+ 15 = YUV420P 12 bpp - Original video, compression enabled
+ 8 = YUVY 16 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ 7 = YUV422 16 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ 1 = GREY 8 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ 6 = RGB555 16 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ 3 = RGB565 16 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ 4 = RGB24 24 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ 5 = RGB32 32 bpp - Software conversion from UYVY
+ When not 0, this parameter will override 'decompression'.
+Default: 0 for every device. Initial palette is 9 (UYVY).
+Note: If 'w9968cf-vpp' is not present, this parameter is set to 9.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: force_rgb
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Read RGB video data instead of BGR:
+ 1 = use RGB component ordering.
+ 0 = use BGR component ordering.
+ This parameter has effect when using RGBX palettes only.
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: autobright
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Image sensor automatically changes brightness:
+ 0 = no, 1 = yes
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: autoexp
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Image sensor automatically changes exposure:
+ 0 = no, 1 = yes
+Default: 1 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: lightfreq
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <50|60[,...]>
+Description: Light frequency in Hz:
+ 50 for European and Asian lighting, 60 for American lighting.
+Default: 50 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: bandingfilter
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Banding filter to reduce effects of fluorescent
+ lighting:
+ 0 disabled, 1 enabled.
+ This filter tries to reduce the pattern of horizontal
+ light/dark bands caused by some (usually fluorescent) lighting.
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: clockdiv
+Type: int array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <-1|n[,...]>
+Description: Force pixel clock divisor to a specific value (for experts):
+ n may vary from 0 to 127.
+ -1 for automatic value.
+ See also the 'double_buffer' module parameter.
+Default: -1 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: backlight
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Objects are lit from behind:
+ 0 = no, 1 = yes
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: mirror
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: Reverse image horizontally:
+ 0 = no, 1 = yes
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: monochrome
+Type: bool array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <0|1[,...]>
+Description: The image sensor is monochrome:
+ 0 = no, 1 = yes
+Default: 0 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: brightness
+Type: long array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: Set picture brightness (0-65535).
+ This parameter has no effect if 'autobright' is enabled.
+Default: 31000 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: hue
+Type: long array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: Set picture hue (0-65535).
+Default: 32768 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: colour
+Type: long array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: Set picture saturation (0-65535).
+Default: 32768 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: contrast
+Type: long array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: Set picture contrast (0-65535).
+Default: 50000 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: whiteness
+Type: long array (min = 0, max = 32)
+Syntax: <n[,...]>
+Description: Set picture whiteness (0-65535).
+Default: 32768 for every device.
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: debug
+Type: int
+Syntax: <n>
+Description: Debugging information level, from 0 to 6:
+ 0 = none (use carefully)
+ 1 = critical errors
+ 2 = significant informations
+ 3 = configuration or general messages
+ 4 = warnings
+ 5 = called functions
+ 6 = function internals
+ Level 5 and 6 are useful for testing only, when only one
+ device is used.
+Default: 2
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Name: specific_debug
+Type: bool
+Syntax: <0|1>
+Description: Enable or disable specific debugging messages:
+ 0 = print messages concerning every level <= 'debug' level.
+ 1 = print messages concerning the level indicated by 'debug'.
+Default: 0
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+
+9. Contact information
+======================
+I may be contacted by e-mail at <luca.risolia@studio.unibo.it>.
+
+I can accept GPG/PGP encrypted e-mail. My GPG key ID is 'FCE635A4'.
+My public 1024-bit key should be available at your keyserver; the fingerprint
+is: '88E8 F32F 7244 68BA 3958 5D40 99DA 5D2A FCE6 35A4'.
+
+
+10. Credits
+==========
+The development would not have proceed much further without having looked at
+the source code of other drivers and without the help of several persons; in
+particular:
+
+- the I2C interface to kernel and high-level image sensor control routines have
+ been taken from the OV511 driver by Mark McClelland;
+
+- memory management code has been copied from the bttv driver by Ralph Metzler,
+ Marcus Metzler and Gerd Knorr;
+
+- the low-level I2C read function has been written by Frederic Jouault;
+
+- the low-level I2C fast write function has been written by Piotr Czerczak.