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authorDavid S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>2013-01-22 14:47:13 -0500
committerDavid S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>2013-01-22 14:47:13 -0500
commit930d52c012b8e69ea87efd7562ded977ee9c9df9 (patch)
treed675cd7d81e7fe097c97bb175312ccc271e590b4 /Documentation/networking
parent0cc8d8df9bb931f1d4ab376f59d8ab8a49f9d4d4 (diff)
parent463d413cb7dcd5509bc01e1108c2e2dcf8104683 (diff)
downloadlinaro-lsk-930d52c012b8e69ea87efd7562ded977ee9c9df9.tar.gz
Merge branch 'legacy-isa-delete' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/paulg/linux
Paul Gortmaker says: ==================== The Ethernet-HowTo was maintained for roughly 10 years, from 1993 to 2003. Fortunately sane hardware probing and auto detection (via PCI and ISA/PnP) largely made the document a relic of the past, hence it being abandoned a decade ago. However, there is one last useful thing that we can extract from the effort made in maintaining that document. We can use it to guide us with respect to what rare, experimental and/or super ancient 10Mbit ISA drivers don't make sense to maintain in-tree anymore. Nobody will argue that ISA is obsolete. Availability went away at about the time Pentium3 motherboards moved from 500MHz Slot1/SECC processors to the green 500MHz Socket 370 Pentium3 chips, at the turn of the century. In theory, it is possible that someone could still be running one of these 12+ year old P3 machines and want 3.9+ bleeding edge kernels (but unlikely). In light of the above (remote) possibility, we can defer the removal of some ISA network drivers that were highly popular and well tested. Typically that means the stuff more from the mid to late '90s, some with ISA PnP support, like the 3c509, the wd/SMC 8390 based stuff, PCnet/lance etc. But a lot of other drivers, typically from the early 1990s were for rare hardware, and experimental (to the point of requiring a cron job that would do a test ping, and then ifconfig down/up and/or a rmmod/insmod!). And some of these drivers (znet, and lp486e to name two) are physically tied to platforms with on motherboard ethernet -- of 486 machines that date from the early 1990s and can only have single digit amounts of memory. What I'd like to achieve here with this series, is to get rid of those old drivers that are no longer being used. In an earlier discussion where I'd proposed deleting a single driver, Alan suggested we instead dump all the historical stuff in one go, to make it "...immediately obvious where the break point is..."[1] and that it was "perfectly reasonable it (and a pile of other ISA cards) ought to be shown the door"[2]. So that is the goal here - make a clear line in the sand where the really ancient stuff finally gets kicked to the curb. Two old parallel port drivers are considered for removal here as well, since in early 386/486 ISA machines, the parallel port was typically found with the UARTS on the multi-I/O ISA controller card. These drivers also date from the early 1990's; parallel ports are no longer found on modern boards, and their performance was not even capable of 10% of 10Mbit bandwidth. Allow me a preemptive justification against the inevitable comments from well meaning bystanders who suggest "why not just leave all this alone?". Dead drivers cost us all if they are left in tree. If you think that is false, then please first consider: -every time you type "git status", you are checking to see if modifications have been made by you to all that dead code. -every time you type "git grep <regex>" you are searching through files which contain that dead code that simply does not interest you. -every time you build a "allyesconfig" and an "allmodconfig" (don't tell me you skip this step before submitting your changes to a maintainer), you waste CPU cycles building this dead code. -every time there is a tree wide API change, or cleanup, or file relocation, we pay the cost of updating dead code, or moving dead code. -daily regression tests (take linux-next as the most transparent example) spend time building (and possibly running) this dead code. -hard working people who regularly run auditing tools looking for lurking bugs (sparse/coverity/smatch/coccinelle) are wasting time checking for, and fixing bugs in this dead code. This last one is key. Please take a look at the git history for the files that are proposed for removal here. Look at the git history for any one of them ("git whatchanged --follow drivers/net/.../driver.c") Mentally sort the changes into two bins -- (1) the robotic tree-wide changes, and (2) the "look I found a real run-time bug while using this" category. You will see that category #2 is essentially empty. Further to that, realize that drivers don't simply disappear. We are not operating in the binary-only distribution space like other OS. All these drivers remain in the git history forever. If a person is an enthusiast for extreme legacy hardware, they are probably already customizing their kernel source and building it themselves to support such systems. Also keep in mind that they could still build the 3.8 kernel exactly as-is, and run it (or a 3.8.x stable variant of it) for several more years if they were really determined to cling to these old experimental ISA drivers for some reason. In summary, I hope that folks can be pragmatic about this, and not get swept up in nostalgia. Ask yourself whether it is realistic to expect a person would have a genuine use case where they would need to build a 3.9+ modern kernel and install it on some legacy hardware that has no option but to absolutely _require_ one of the drivers that are deleted here. The following series was created with --irreversible-delete for ease of review (it skips showing the content of files that are deleted); however the complete patches can be pulled as per below. ==================== Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
Diffstat (limited to 'Documentation/networking')
-rw-r--r--Documentation/networking/00-INDEX4
-rw-r--r--Documentation/networking/DLINK.txt203
-rw-r--r--Documentation/networking/depca.txt92
-rw-r--r--Documentation/networking/ewrk3.txt46
4 files changed, 0 insertions, 345 deletions
diff --git a/Documentation/networking/00-INDEX b/Documentation/networking/00-INDEX
index 1abfff26f8a..258d9b92c36 100644
--- a/Documentation/networking/00-INDEX
+++ b/Documentation/networking/00-INDEX
@@ -52,8 +52,6 @@ de4x5.txt
- the Digital EtherWORKS DE4?? and DE5?? PCI Ethernet driver
decnet.txt
- info on using the DECnet networking layer in Linux.
-depca.txt
- - the Digital DEPCA/EtherWORKS DE1?? and DE2?? LANCE Ethernet driver
dl2k.txt
- README for D-Link DL2000-based Gigabit Ethernet Adapters (dl2k.ko).
dm9000.txt
@@ -72,8 +70,6 @@ e1000e.txt
- README for the Intel Gigabit Ethernet Driver (e1000e).
eql.txt
- serial IP load balancing
-ewrk3.txt
- - the Digital EtherWORKS 3 DE203/4/5 Ethernet driver
fib_trie.txt
- Level Compressed Trie (LC-trie) notes: a structure for routing.
filter.txt
diff --git a/Documentation/networking/DLINK.txt b/Documentation/networking/DLINK.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index 55d24433d15..00000000000
--- a/Documentation/networking/DLINK.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,203 +0,0 @@
-Released 1994-06-13
-
-
- CONTENTS:
-
- 1. Introduction.
- 2. License.
- 3. Files in this release.
- 4. Installation.
- 5. Problems and tuning.
- 6. Using the drivers with earlier releases.
- 7. Acknowledgments.
-
-
- 1. INTRODUCTION.
-
- This is a set of Ethernet drivers for the D-Link DE-600/DE-620
- pocket adapters, for the parallel port on a Linux based machine.
- Some adapter "clones" will also work. Xircom is _not_ a clone...
- These drivers _can_ be used as loadable modules,
- and were developed for use on Linux 1.1.13 and above.
- For use on Linux 1.0.X, or earlier releases, see below.
-
- I have used these drivers for NFS, ftp, telnet and X-clients on
- remote machines. Transmissions with ftp seems to work as
- good as can be expected (i.e. > 80k bytes/sec) from a
- parallel port...:-) Receive speeds will be about 60-80% of this.
- Depending on your machine, somewhat higher speeds can be achieved.
-
- All comments/fixes to Bjorn Ekwall (bj0rn@blox.se).
-
-
- 2. LICENSE.
-
- This program is free software; you can redistribute it
- and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public
- License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
- version 2, or (at your option) any later version.
-
- This program is distributed in the hope that it will be
- useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied
- warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
- PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more
- details.
-
- You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public
- License along with this program; if not, write to the Free
- Software Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA
- 02139, USA.
-
-
- 3. FILES IN THIS RELEASE.
-
- README.DLINK This file.
- de600.c The Source (may it be with You :-) for the DE-600
- de620.c ditto for the DE-620
- de620.h Macros for de620.c
-
- If you are upgrading from the d-link tar release, there will
- also be a "dlink-patches" file that will patch Linux 1.1.18:
- linux/drivers/net/Makefile
- linux/drivers/net/CONFIG
- linux/drivers/net/MODULES
- linux/drivers/net/Space.c
- linux/config.in
- Apply the patch by:
- "cd /usr/src; patch -p0 < linux/drivers/net/dlink-patches"
- The old source, "linux/drivers/net/d_link.c", can be removed.
-
-
- 4. INSTALLATION.
-
- o Get the latest net binaries, according to current net.wisdom.
-
- o Read the NET-2 and Ethernet HOWTOs and modify your setup.
-
- o If your parallel port has a strange address or irq,
- modify "linux/drivers/net/CONFIG" accordingly, or adjust
- the parameters in the "tuning" section in the sources.
-
- If you are going to use the drivers as loadable modules, do _not_
- enable them while doing "make config", but instead make sure that
- the drivers are included in "linux/drivers/net/MODULES".
-
- If you are _not_ going to use the driver(s) as loadable modules,
- but instead have them included in the kernel, remember to enable
- the drivers while doing "make config".
-
- o To include networking and DE600/DE620 support in your kernel:
- # cd /linux
- (as modules:)
- # make config (answer yes on CONFIG_NET and CONFIG_INET)
- (else included in the kernel:)
- # make config (answer yes on CONFIG _NET, _INET and _DE600 or _DE620)
- # make clean
- # make zImage (or whatever magic you usually do)
-
- o I use lilo to boot multiple kernels, so that I at least
- can have one working kernel :-). If you do too, append
- these lines to /etc/lilo/config:
-
- image = /linux/zImage
- label = newlinux
- root = /dev/hda2 (or whatever YOU have...)
-
- # /etc/lilo/install
-
- o Do "sync" and reboot the new kernel with a D-Link
- DE-600/DE-620 pocket adapter connected.
-
- o The adapter can be configured with ifconfig eth?
- where the actual number is decided by the kernel
- when the drivers are initialized.
-
-
- 5. "PROBLEMS" AND TUNING,
-
- o If you see error messages from the driver, and if the traffic
- stops on the adapter, try to do "ifconfig" and "route" once
- more, just as in "rc.inet1". This should take care of most
- problems, including effects from power loss, or adapters that
- aren't connected to the printer port in some way or another.
- You can somewhat change the behaviour by enabling/disabling
- the macro SHUTDOWN_WHEN_LOST in the "tuning" section.
- For the DE-600 there is another macro, CHECK_LOST_DE600,
- that you might want to read about in the "tuning" section.
-
- o Some machines have trouble handling the parallel port and
- the adapter at high speed. If you experience problems:
-
- DE-600:
- - The adapter is not recognized at boot, i.e. an Ethernet
- address of 00:80:c8:... is not shown, try to add another
- "; SLOW_DOWN_IO"
- at DE600_SLOW_DOWN in the "tuning" section. As a last resort,
- uncomment: "#define REALLY_SLOW_IO" (see <asm/io.h> for hints).
-
- - You experience "timeout" messages: first try to add another
- "; SLOW_DOWN_IO"
- at DE600_SLOW_DOWN in the "tuning" section, _then_ try to
- increase the value (original value: 5) at
- "if (tickssofar < 5)" near line 422.
-
- DE-620:
- - Your parallel port might be "sluggish". To cater for
- this, there are the macros LOWSPEED and READ_DELAY/WRITE_DELAY
- in the "tuning" section. Your first step should be to enable
- LOWSPEED, and after that you can "tune" the XXX_DELAY values.
-
- o If the adapter _is_ recognized at boot but you get messages
- about "Network Unreachable", then the problem is probably
- _not_ with the driver. Check your net configuration instead
- (ifconfig and route) in "rc.inet1".
-
- o There is some rudimentary support for debugging, look at
- the source. Use "-DDE600_DEBUG=3" or "-DDE620_DEBUG=3"
- when compiling, or include it in "linux/drivers/net/CONFIG".
- IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS YOU CAN'T SOLVE: PLEASE COMPILE THE DRIVER
- WITH DEBUGGING ENABLED, AND SEND ME THE RESULTING OUTPUT!
-
-
- 6. USING THE DRIVERS WITH EARLIER RELEASES.
-
- The later 1.1.X releases of the Linux kernel include some
- changes in the networking layer (a.k.a. NET3). This affects
- these drivers in a few places. The hints that follow are
- _not_ tested by me, since I don't have the disk space to keep
- all releases on-line.
- Known needed changes to date:
- - release patchfile: some patches will fail, but they should
- be easy to apply "by hand", since they are trivial.
- (Space.c: d_link_init() is now called de600_probe())
- - de600.c: change "mark_bh(NET_BH)" to "mark_bh(INET_BH)".
- - de620.c: (maybe) change the code around "netif_rx(skb);" to be
- similar to the code around "dev_rint(...)" in de600.c
-
-
- 7. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
-
- These drivers wouldn't have been done without the base
- (and support) from Ross Biro, and D-Link Systems Inc.
- The driver relies upon GPL-ed source from D-Link Systems Inc.
- and from Russel Nelson at Crynwr Software <nelson@crynwr.com>.
-
- Additional input also from:
- Donald Becker <becker@super.org>, Alan Cox <A.Cox@swansea.ac.uk>
- and Fred N. van Kempen <waltje@uWalt.NL.Mugnet.ORG>
-
- DE-600 alpha release primary victim^H^H^H^H^H^Htester:
- - Erik Proper <erikp@cs.kun.nl>.
- Good input also from several users, most notably
- - Mark Burton <markb@ordern.demon.co.uk>.
-
- DE-620 alpha release victims^H^H^H^H^H^H^Htesters:
- - J. Joshua Kopper <kopper@rtsg.mot.com>
- - Olav Kvittem <Olav.Kvittem@uninett.no>
- - Germano Caronni <caronni@nessie.cs.id.ethz.ch>
- - Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy@suite.sw.oz.au>
-
-
- Happy hacking!
-
- Bjorn Ekwall == bj0rn@blox.se
diff --git a/Documentation/networking/depca.txt b/Documentation/networking/depca.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index 24c6b26e565..00000000000
--- a/Documentation/networking/depca.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,92 +0,0 @@
-
-DE10x
-=====
-
-Memory Addresses:
-
- SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4
-64K on on on on d0000 dbfff
- off on on on c0000 cbfff
- off off on on e0000 ebfff
-
-32K on on off on d8000 dbfff
- off on off on c8000 cbfff
- off off off on e8000 ebfff
-
-DBR ROM on on dc000 dffff
- off on cc000 cffff
- off off ec000 effff
-
-Note that the 2K mode is set by SW3/SW4 on/off or off/off. Address
-assignment is through the RBSA register.
-
-I/O Address:
- SW5
-0x300 on
-0x200 off
-
-Remote Boot:
- SW6
-Disable on
-Enable off
-
-Remote Boot Timeout:
- SW7
-2.5min on
-30s off
-
-IRQ:
- SW8 SW9 SW10 SW11 SW12
-2 on off off off off
-3 off on off off off
-4 off off on off off
-5 off off off on off
-7 off off off off on
-
-DE20x
-=====
-
-Memory Size:
-
- SW3 SW4
-64K on on
-32K off on
-2K on off
-2K off off
-
-Start Addresses:
-
- SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4
-64K on on on on c0000 cffff
- on off on on d0000 dffff
- off on on on e0000 effff
-
-32K on on off off c8000 cffff
- on off off off d8000 dffff
- off on off off e8000 effff
-
-Illegal off off - - - -
-
-I/O Address:
- SW5
-0x300 on
-0x200 off
-
-Remote Boot:
- SW6
-Disable on
-Enable off
-
-Remote Boot Timeout:
- SW7
-2.5min on
-30s off
-
-IRQ:
- SW8 SW9 SW10 SW11 SW12
-5 on off off off off
-9 off on off off off
-10 off off on off off
-11 off off off on off
-15 off off off off on
-
diff --git a/Documentation/networking/ewrk3.txt b/Documentation/networking/ewrk3.txt
deleted file mode 100644
index 90e9e5f16e6..00000000000
--- a/Documentation/networking/ewrk3.txt
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,46 +0,0 @@
-The EtherWORKS 3 driver in this distribution is designed to work with all
-kernels > 1.1.33 (approx) and includes tools in the 'ewrk3tools'
-subdirectory to allow set up of the card, similar to the MSDOS
-'NICSETUP.EXE' tools provided on the DOS drivers disk (type 'make' in that
-subdirectory to make the tools).
-
-The supported cards are DE203, DE204 and DE205. All other cards are NOT
-supported - refer to 'depca.c' for running the LANCE based network cards and
-'de4x5.c' for the DIGITAL Semiconductor PCI chip based adapters from
-Digital.
-
-The ability to load this driver as a loadable module has been included and
-used extensively during the driver development (to save those long reboot
-sequences). To utilise this ability, you have to do 8 things:
-
- 0) have a copy of the loadable modules code installed on your system.
- 1) copy ewrk3.c from the /linux/drivers/net directory to your favourite
- temporary directory.
- 2) edit the source code near line 1898 to reflect the I/O address and
- IRQ you're using.
- 3) compile ewrk3.c, but include -DMODULE in the command line to ensure
- that the correct bits are compiled (see end of source code).
- 4) if you are wanting to add a new card, goto 5. Otherwise, recompile a
- kernel with the ewrk3 configuration turned off and reboot.
- 5) insmod ewrk3.o
- [Alan Cox: Changed this so you can insmod ewrk3.o irq=x io=y]
- [Adam Kropelin: Multiple cards now supported by irq=x1,x2 io=y1,y2]
- 6) run the net startup bits for your new eth?? interface manually
- (usually /etc/rc.inet[12] at boot time).
- 7) enjoy!
-
- Note that autoprobing is not allowed in loadable modules - the system is
- already up and running and you're messing with interrupts.
-
- To unload a module, turn off the associated interface
- 'ifconfig eth?? down' then 'rmmod ewrk3'.
-
-The performance we've achieved so far has been measured through the 'ttcp'
-tool at 975kB/s. This measures the total TCP stack performance which
-includes the card, so don't expect to get much nearer the 1.25MB/s
-theoretical Ethernet rate.
-
-
-Enjoy!
-
-Dave